New Foundation (new + foundation)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Cost,benefit analysis: New foundations on shifting sand

REGULATION & GOVERNANCE, Issue 1 2009
2006), A review of Matthew D. Adler, Benefit Analysis (Harvard University Press, Eric A. Posner's New Foundations of Cost
Abstract New Foundations of Cost,Benefit Analysis, by Matthew Adler and Eric Posner, represents the most ambitious and credible effort to date to build a solid theoretical defense of the use of cost,benefit analysis (CBA) in evaluating government regulation. In this review, three cost,benefit "skeptics" offer their reactions to this ambitious and important book. We note its virtues , its humility, its scrupulousness, its open-mindedness. We also explore its vices. If preferences are to be "laundered," is it intellectually defensible to remove the bad but not consider adding the good? Does Adler's and Posner's welfarism really play the limited role they suppose, or does it risk "crowding out" other important deontological and distributional values? If CBA is merely a decision procedure that provides an imperfect proxy of welfare , the moral criterion we really care about , how do we know that the proxy it provides in practice will actually be accurate enough to be useful? Isn't this at bottom an empirical question that cannot be answered by this thoroughly theoretical book? If CBA is no more than an imperfect proxy for welfare, then alternative imperfect decision procedures may perform better in the real world. [source]


New foundation focused on the early detection of cancer

CANCER, Issue 4 2010
Carrie Printz
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Cost,benefit analysis: New foundations on shifting sand

REGULATION & GOVERNANCE, Issue 1 2009
2006), A review of Matthew D. Adler, Benefit Analysis (Harvard University Press, Eric A. Posner's New Foundations of Cost
Abstract New Foundations of Cost,Benefit Analysis, by Matthew Adler and Eric Posner, represents the most ambitious and credible effort to date to build a solid theoretical defense of the use of cost,benefit analysis (CBA) in evaluating government regulation. In this review, three cost,benefit "skeptics" offer their reactions to this ambitious and important book. We note its virtues , its humility, its scrupulousness, its open-mindedness. We also explore its vices. If preferences are to be "laundered," is it intellectually defensible to remove the bad but not consider adding the good? Does Adler's and Posner's welfarism really play the limited role they suppose, or does it risk "crowding out" other important deontological and distributional values? If CBA is merely a decision procedure that provides an imperfect proxy of welfare , the moral criterion we really care about , how do we know that the proxy it provides in practice will actually be accurate enough to be useful? Isn't this at bottom an empirical question that cannot be answered by this thoroughly theoretical book? If CBA is no more than an imperfect proxy for welfare, then alternative imperfect decision procedures may perform better in the real world. [source]


The innovating region: toward a theory of knowledge-based regional development

R & D MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2005
Henry Etzkowitz
This paper sets forth a model of knowledge-based regional development conceived as a set of multi-linear dynamics, based on alternative technological paradigms. Utilizing longitudinal data from a Swedish region, and international comparisons, four stages of development are identified: Inception, Implementation, Consolidation and Renewal. Innovation policy is created ,bottom-up' as an outcome of ,collective entrepreneurship' through collaboration among business, government and academic actors , the ,triple helix'. The key event is the creation of an entrepreneurial university, whether from an existing academic base or a new foundation, which takes initiatives together with government and industry to create a support structure for firm formation and regional growth. The result of these initiatives is a self-sustaining dynamic in which the role of academia and government appears to recede as industrial actors come to the fore and a lineage of firms is created. Nevertheless, as one technological paradigm is exhausted and another one is needed as the base for new economic activity, the role of academia and government comes to the fore again in creating the conditions for the next wave of innovation. [source]


Community in Public Policy: Fad or Foundation?

AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, Issue 2 2001
David Adams
Both internationally and within Australia public policy is experiencing a rush back to the idea of community. After 15 years of discourse about the new public management and economic rationalism a much older discourse is slipping back into public policy. It is a normative discourse about changing relations between state democracy, market capitalism and civil society in which the idea of community is a central ,new' relation used to manage both state and market failures. Already new policy tools emerging from this discourse can be seen with innovations based on concepts such as partnerships, place management, and a raft of community consultation mechanisms. Much of the rhetoric about community as a new foundation for public policy, however, remains confused. The result is a muddle of ideas in which this potentially useful concept is in danger of becoming just another public policy reform fad. This article looks at what policy makers are saying about community, identifies problems in this current usage and offers ways of thinking about community with a view to establishing its policy utility. [source]


Vestrogothia spinata (Phosphatocopina, Crustacea), Fossils of Orsten-type Preservation from the Upper Cambrian of Western Hunan, South China

ACTA GEOLOGICA SINICA (ENGLISH EDITION), Issue 3 2009
Zheng LIU
Abstract: Fossils of Orsten-type preservation represented by the crustacean Skaracarida and Phosphatocopida were found in western Hunan, South China in 2005, including the important phosphatocopid species Vestrogothia spinata based on exquisitely preserved soft-bodied specimens that allow the first growth stage to be reestablished. The taxonomy of Vestrogothia spinata is revised employing the character of a two-divided limb stem of the mandible. A new foundation for the phytogeny of the Phosphatocopina using mandible characters related to crustacean appendages is postulated. Vestrogothia spinata has only previously been found from Sweden. [source]


PHILOSOPHY AS TRANSLATION: DEMOCRACY AND EDUCATION FROM DEWEY TO CAVELL

EDUCATIONAL THEORY, Issue 3 2007
Naoko Saito
In this essay Naoko Saito aims to find an alternative idea and language for "mutual national understanding," one that is more attuned to the sensibility of our times. She argues for Stanley Cavell's idea of philosophy as translation as such an alternative. Based upon Cavell's rereading of Thoreau's Walden, Saito represents Thoreau as a cross-cultural figure who transcends cultural and national boundaries. On the strength of this, she proposes a Cavellian education for global citizenship, that is, a perfectionist education for imperfect understanding in acknowledgment of alterity. Our founding of democracy must depend upon a readiness to "deconfound" the culture we have come from, the better to find new foundations together. The "native" is always in transition, by and through language, in processes of translation. [source]