New Faculty (new + faculty)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Reshaping the Forces that Perpetuate the Research-Practice Gap: Focus on New Faculty

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION, Issue 110 2000
Carol L. Colbeck
If the research-practice gap is to be bridged, the forces that shape faculty, such as socialization, tenure, and promotion, as well as the relationship between scholars and practitioners must be altered. [source]


The role of mentoring on research productivity among occupational therapy faculty

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY INTERNATIONAL, Issue 1 2002
OTR/L Assistant Professor, Stanley Paul PhD
Abstract This study surveyed junior and senior occupational therapy faculty in order to further understand the role that mentoring plays in research productivity. Junior faculty with and without mentors were compared in terms of their overall research productivity, and the senior faculty who served as mentors were compared with senior faculty who were not mentors. The role of institutional support factors on research productivity was also examined. The results of this survey suggest that mentoring plays an important role in increasing research productivity in junior faculty in the field of occupational therapy. Also, senior faculty mentors perceived their mentoring experience to enhance their research productivity. A general profile of an occupational therapy mentor and mentee has emerged from the results. Analyses showed a low to moderate positive correlation between faculty research productivity and a number of institutional support factors. Availability of intramural funds, release time, chair and dean support for research, grant writing seminars, and availability of statistical and computing help correlated with research productivity. The authors recommend the need for mentoring in occupational therapy academia. New faculty should have a mentor or mentors to help them succeed in research, teaching and service goals. Developing short-term and long-term goals with the mentor and periodic evaluation of goals will help new faculty to keep pace with the demands and requirements of their academic positions. Copyright 2002 Whurr Publishers Ltd. [source]


Mentoring: A Key Strategy to Prepare the Next Generation of Physicians to Care for an Aging America

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 7 2009
Heidi K. White MD
Mentoring is an important instructional strategy that should be maximally used to develop the next generation of physicians who will care for a growing population of frail older adults. Mentoring can fulfill three specific purposes: (1) help learners choose an area of specialty, (2) help fellows and new faculty navigate advancement in the academic environment, and (3) help new physicians enter a local medical community and develop a high-quality, professionally rewarding, financially viable practice that meets the needs of older adults. The components and process of mentoring are reviewed. Current and potential mechanisms to promote mentoring for the specific purpose of increasing the quality and quantity of physicians available to care for the older adult population are discussed. [source]


The role of mentoring on research productivity among occupational therapy faculty

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY INTERNATIONAL, Issue 1 2002
OTR/L Assistant Professor, Stanley Paul PhD
Abstract This study surveyed junior and senior occupational therapy faculty in order to further understand the role that mentoring plays in research productivity. Junior faculty with and without mentors were compared in terms of their overall research productivity, and the senior faculty who served as mentors were compared with senior faculty who were not mentors. The role of institutional support factors on research productivity was also examined. The results of this survey suggest that mentoring plays an important role in increasing research productivity in junior faculty in the field of occupational therapy. Also, senior faculty mentors perceived their mentoring experience to enhance their research productivity. A general profile of an occupational therapy mentor and mentee has emerged from the results. Analyses showed a low to moderate positive correlation between faculty research productivity and a number of institutional support factors. Availability of intramural funds, release time, chair and dean support for research, grant writing seminars, and availability of statistical and computing help correlated with research productivity. The authors recommend the need for mentoring in occupational therapy academia. New faculty should have a mentor or mentors to help them succeed in research, teaching and service goals. Developing short-term and long-term goals with the mentor and periodic evaluation of goals will help new faculty to keep pace with the demands and requirements of their academic positions. Copyright 2002 Whurr Publishers Ltd. [source]