Network Ties (network + tie)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The Effect of Network Ties on Accounting Controls in a Supply Alliance: Field Study Evidence,

CONTEMPORARY ACCOUNTING RESEARCH, Issue 1 2007
Wai Fong Chua
First page of article [source]


A Contingent Model of Network Utilization in Early Financing of Technology Ventures

ENTREPRENEURSHIP THEORY AND PRACTICE, Issue 4 2008
Jing Zhang
Most of the entrepreneurship literature has addressed the benefits and necessity of using social network ties as opposed to market methods in early venture finance, but it has largely understated the potential limitations and costs of doing so. Specifically, very sparse research has examined the factors that influence entrepreneurs' choice between using networks versus market methods. In this study, we propose a contingent model of network utilization when approaching initial investors, based on the dimensions of human capital of the entrepreneurs. We test this model with primary field survey data from 226 new high-tech ventures in Singapore and Beijing. The results show that high occupational status and relevant industrial work experience are positively associated with the entrepreneurs' propensity to utilize existing networks by enhancing the resourcefulness of their network ties (social capital); however, such influences are alleviated by entrepreneurs' marketing or managerial experience, which increases the entrepreneurs' ability to interact with strangers (an aspect of social competence). [source]


The role of migrant networks in linking local labour markets: the case of Asian Indian migration to New York and London

GLOBAL NETWORKS, Issue 3 2001
Maritsa V. Poros
Social networks have long been identified as crucial to migration flows and the economic behaviour of immigrants. Much of the literature on international migration and economic sociology specifically focuses on the role of interpersonal ties in influencing migration and economic action, such as finding employment. Using the case of Gujarati Indian migration to New York and London, the life histories of these immigrants illustrate that specific configurations of network ties result in different migration flows and occupational outcomes. These configurations include organizational, composite, and interpersonal ties that link local labour markets transnationally and channel immigrants to particular destinations and into particular occupations. The findings clarify the role and meaning of networks as they affect different types of migration and the occupational outcomes of migrants. The prominence of these network mechanisms also challenges the role of human capital in producing distinct outcomes for immigrants. [source]


Different ties for different needs: Recruitment practices of entrepreneurial firms at different developmental phases

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2003
Aegean Leung
Entrepreneurial firms face significant challenges in attracting and acquiring needed human resources. That is, in addition to difficulties associated with resource constraints and organization legitimacy, the requirements for "person-organization fit" change substantially as these firms transit from start-up to growth phase. This study examines how entrepreneurial firms tap evolving social network ties in order to address "needs-and-fits" issues across different developmental stages of the firm. The findings go beyond what "strength of weak ties" and "structural hole" theories would suggest, and highlight the persistent use of strong and direct ties across developmental phases. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Network Updating and Exploratory Learning Environment*

JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, Issue 6 2004
Mooweon Rhee
abstract This paper examines how the current relevance of social capital derived from a task-advice network affects an actor's exploratory learning environment. Building on Burt's (1992) structural holes hypothesis that a large, sparse task advice network enhances an actor's exploratory learning environment, I propose that such effects hold only when the direct and indirect network ties are composed of current network contacts (ones that have been updated since the last change in positions of an actor). Analyses of data from a sample of 230 salaried employees of a high-technology manufacturing corporation support my arguments. In addition to the focus of social capital research on network structure, therefore, this study emphasizes the time-contingent value of social capital. [source]


The Ties Made in the Harvest: Nicaraguan Farm-worker Networks in Costa Rica's Agricultural Exports

JOURNAL OF AGRARIAN CHANGE, Issue 4 2010
SANG E. LEE
Traditional and nontraditional export agriculture expansion dramatically changed the social and economic landscapes in the global south. An examination of one aspect of south,south international migration, Nicaraguan migrant economic integration into Costa Rica's export agriculture sector, reveals how production systems in the traditional and nontraditional agricultural sectors shape migrant social networks in distinct ways in the global south and its significance for both migrant workers and the agricultural sectors they work in. The rapid expansion of nontraditional export agriculture , the essence of agricultural development in Costa Rica , depends on the traditional crop production structure of coffee farms. The experiences of Nicaraguan migrant workers and their social ties to each other in nontraditional export agriculture and the coffee farms in Costa Rica demonstrate how different production structures call for distinct fragile and conflicted social networks ties between migrants. The economic integration of migrant workers relies on opportunistic and weak ties that are both gendered and contradictory. [source]