Need

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences

Kinds of Need

  • actual need
  • agencies need
  • agent need
  • analysis need
  • basic human need
  • basic need
  • care need
  • caregiver need
  • carer need
  • change need
  • changing need
  • children need
  • clear need
  • client need
  • clinical need
  • competing need
  • complex need
  • consequent need
  • conservation need
  • considerable need
  • consumer need
  • continued need
  • continuing need
  • critical need
  • cultural need
  • current need
  • customer need
  • data need
  • decreased need
  • dental need
  • development need
  • developmental need
  • different need
  • diverse need
  • ecological need
  • economic need
  • educational need
  • effects need
  • emotional need
  • energetic need
  • family caregiver need
  • family need
  • financial need
  • finding need
  • future need
  • future studies need
  • great need
  • greater need
  • greatest need
  • growing need
  • health care need
  • health need
  • high need
  • human need
  • immediate need
  • important need
  • increased need
  • increasing need
  • individual need
  • individual patient need
  • infant need
  • information need
  • informational need
  • intervention need
  • issues need
  • learning need
  • linguistic need
  • local need
  • management need
  • managers need
  • many need
  • material need
  • medical need
  • mental health need
  • metabolic need
  • methods need
  • model need
  • models need
  • multiple need
  • new need
  • nurse need
  • nutritional need
  • ongoing need
  • only need
  • organizational need
  • orthodontic treatment need
  • own need
  • particular need
  • patient individual need
  • patient need
  • people need
  • perceived need
  • personal need
  • physical need
  • physiological need
  • population need
  • possible need
  • potential need
  • practical need
  • practice need
  • pressing need
  • producers need
  • psychological need
  • public need
  • real need
  • recognized need
  • reduced need
  • research need
  • resident need
  • resource need
  • scientists need
  • service need
  • services need
  • significant need
  • similar need
  • skill need
  • social need
  • society need
  • special educational need
  • special need
  • species need
  • specific need
  • spiritual need
  • staff need
  • strong need
  • student need
  • studies need
  • study need
  • subjective need
  • subsequent need
  • support need
  • system need
  • techniques need
  • therapeutic need
  • training need
  • transfusion need
  • treatment need
  • trials need
  • unique need
  • unmet clinical need
  • unmet medical need
  • unmet need
  • unmet treatment need
  • urgent need
  • user need
  • variable need
  • water need
  • we need
  • women need

  • Terms modified by Need

  • need analysis
  • need assessment
  • need education
  • need satisfaction
  • need support

  • Selected Abstracts


    THE NEED FOR A MULTI-FACETED RESPONSE TO INTIMATE PARTNER ABUSE PERPETRATED BY AFRICAN-AMERICANS

    CRIMINOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY, Issue 2 2007
    HILLARY POTTER
    First page of article [source]


    THE NEED FOR MORE EXPLANATORY HUMILITY IN ADDICTION NEUROBIOLOGY

    ADDICTION, Issue 5 2010
    ADRIAN CARTER
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    THE NEED FOR JOINED-UP DEBT MANAGEMENT POLICY

    ECONOMIC AFFAIRS, Issue 1 2010
    Tim Congdon
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    BEYOND TAX: THE NEED FOR RESEARCH ON ALCOHOL PRICING POLICIES

    ADDICTION, Issue 3 2010
    FRANK J. CHALOUPKA
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    SUPPORTING THE NEED FOR RIGOROUS ENFORCEABLE DISCLOSURE POLICIES FOR SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS

    ADDICTION, Issue 11 2009
    JENNIFER SASS
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    THE NEED FOR MORE QUASI-EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION DURING PREGNANCY

    ADDICTION, Issue 8 2009
    BRIAN M. D'ONOFRIO
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    [Commentary] WHAT MORE DO WE NEED TO KNOW ABOUT MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT FOR PRESCRIPTION OPIOID ABUSERS?

    ADDICTION, Issue 5 2009
    STEPHEN MAGURA
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    FURTHER CLEAR EXAMPLES OF THE NEED FOR MORE REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS AND CRITIQUES ABOUT PREVENTION

    ADDICTION, Issue 1 2009
    RICHARD SPOTH
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    USING NEUROBIOLOGY TO REFRAME THE NEED FOR ALCOHOL POLICY INTERVENTIONS

    ADDICTION, Issue 9 2007
    JODIE A. TRAFTON
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    ASSESSING CURRENT ADAPTATION AND PHYLOGENETIC INERTIA AS EXPLANATIONS OF TRAIT EVOLUTION:THE NEED FOR CONTROLLED COMPARISONS

    EVOLUTION, Issue 10 2005
    Thomas F. Hansen
    Abstract The determination of whether the pattern of trait evolution observed in a comparative analysis of species data is due to adaptation to current environments, to phylogenetic inertia, or to both of these forces requires that one control for the effects of either force when making an assessment of the evolutionary role of the other. Orzack and Sober (2001) developed the method of controlled comparisons to make such assessments; their implementation of the method focussed on a discretely varying trait. Here, we show that the method of controlled comparisons can be viewed as a meta-method, which can be implemented in many ways. We discuss which recent methods for the comparative analysis of continuously distributed traits can generate controlled comparisons and can thereby be used to properly assess whether current adaptation and/or phylogenetic inertia have influenced a trait's evolution. The implementation of controlled comparisons is illustrated by an analysis of sex-ratio data for fig wasps. This analysis suggests that current adaptation and phylogenetic inertia influence this trait. [source]


    MAKING ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION (ADR) LESS ALTERNATIVE: THE NEED FOR ADR AS BOTH A MANDATORY CONTINUING LEGAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT AND A BAR EXAM TOPIC

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 4 2006
    Dori CohenArticle first published online: 11 SEP 200
    Divorce proceedings have had a negative reputation due to their adversarial nature. Litigation in the family law field has exacerbated an already emotionally charged atmosphere. Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) has grown in importance over the past three decades and has helped to alleviate some of the animosity which accompanies divorce and child custody matters. Parents in particular are aided by the benefits of options such as mediation and collaborative divorce, obtaining increased control over their agreements in situations where the relationships will be continuous due to shared parenting responsibilities. However, much more could be done to increase the use of ADR in family law proceedings. Current family law practitioners could fill many roles, including mediator, advocate during mediation, collaborative negotiator, arbitrator, and counselor regarding which process to implement. Knowledge about these different roles, with their attendant skills and ethical issues, has become imperative. This Note will advocate for a mandatory continuing legal education requirement in ADR for matrimonial attorneys, as well as for the inclusion of ADR as a topic on state bar examinations. An increased knowledge of ADR will benefit divorcing parents and their children, ease an overcrowded court system, and lead to greater personal and professional satisfaction for the family law practitioner. [source]


    THE UNITED NATIONS CONVENTION ON THE RIGHTS OF THE CHILD AND THE NEED FOR ITS INCORPORATION INTO A BILL OF RIGHTS

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 1 2006
    Hon. Alastair Nicholson
    In this article I discuss the failure of most democratic countries to accept or properly implement the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, despite, except in the case of the United States, having ratified it. I consider the domestic implementation of treaties. I discuss, from an Australian perspective, that country's failure to enact a Bill of Rights and argue that children in Australia have suffered as a result. I also discuss judicial approaches to international law and compare the situation in countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and New Zealand and suggest that even in those countries that do have a Bill of Rights, it is not oriented toward children and therefore does not properly recognize their rights. [source]


    STRATEGIES AND NEED FOR SYSTEMS CHANGE

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 2 2000
    Improving Court Practice for the Millennium
    Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye of New York delivered the following address to the Millennium Conference of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges in Washington, D.C., on November 15, 1999. In it, she describes the development of the philosophy of the family court in the past century. Judge Kaye describes the family court's transition from reliance on social science to the incorporation of procedural due process guarantees in the Gault decision. She suggests that a further transformation is required to meet the needs of children and families in the 21st century. Judge Kaye proposes that in the next millennium the family court abandon the "remote adjudicator" judge who evolved after Gault to a "problem-solving model of judging, a judge who looks at the issues that are driving the caseload, who looks at the results that are being achieved, and who uses a hands-on style to figure out how we might do better both in individual cases and on a systemic level." The New York Times described Chief Justice Kaye as, "A dedicated and effective reformer of the state's sprawling court system. Each of her hard won changes has had a positive impact." Chief Judge Kaye recently received the National Center for State Courts' William H. Rhenquist Award for Judicial Excellence in November 1999. On the occasion of the award, Roger K. Warren, president of the National Center, observed about her,"There are many who are working hard to better process the many cases that come before the state courts, but there are few working an harder or more successfully to better serve the people who use the state courts." [source]


    INFECTION CONTROL IN LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES: THE NEED FOR ENGAGEMENT

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 3 2009
    Denise R. Flinn MD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    CLINICAL NEED FOR OTOTOPICAL FLUOROQUINOLONES OUTWEIGHS MINISCULE RISK OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE

    JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, Issue 4 2006
    Sophie Couzos Dr
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    ACCEPTANCE AND REJECTION OF DIALYSIS,THE NEED FOR PATIENT EVALUATION

    JOURNAL OF RENAL CARE, Issue 1 2008
    H. Noble
    [source]


    COMPETITIVE PRIORITIES: INVESTIGATING THE NEED FOR TRADE-OFFS IN OPERATIONS STRATEGY

    PRODUCTION AND OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2002
    KENNETH K. BOYER
    A heated debate continues over the need for trade-offs in operations strategy. Some researchers call for plants to focus on a single manufacturing capability and devote their limited resources accordingly, while others claim that advanced manufacturing technology (amt) enables concurrent improvements in quality, cost, flexibility, and delivery. Yet there is little empirical evidence for or against the trade-off model. In response, this study addresses the question: "To what extent do manufacturing plants view competitive priorities as trade-offs?" We employ survey data collected from managers and operators in 110 plants that have recently implemented AMT. Our findings suggest that trade-offs remain. However, perceived differences in competitive priorities are subtle and may vary across levels of the plant hierarchy. [source]


    RURAL SURGERY AND RURAL SURGEONS: MEETING THE NEED

    ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Issue 11 2007
    John C. Graham FRACS
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    MECHANISMS MEDIATING PRESSURE NATRIURESIS: WHAT WE KNOW and WHAT WE NEED TO FIND OUT

    CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, Issue 5-6 2005
    Roger G Evans
    SUMMARY 1.,It is well established that pressure natriuresis plays a key role in long-term blood pressure regulation, but our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this process is incomplete. 2.,Pressure natriuresis is chiefly mediated by inhibition of tubular sodium reabsorption, because both total renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate are efficiently autoregulated. Inhibition of active sodium transport within both the proximal and distal tubules likely makes a contribution. Increased renal interstitial hydrostatic pressure (RIHP) likely inhibits sodium reabsorption by altering passive diffusion through paracellular pathways in ,leaky' tubular elements. 3.,Nitric oxide and products of cytochrome P450-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism are key signalling mechanisms in pressure natriuresis, although their precise roles remain to be determined. 4.,The key unresolved question is, how is increased renal artery pressure ,sensed' by the kidney? One proposal rests on the notion that blood flow in the renal medulla is poorly autoregulated, so that increased renal artery pressure leads to increased renal medullary blood flow (MBF), which, in turn, leads to increased RIHP. An alternative proposal is that the process of autoregulation of renal blood flow leads to increased shear stress in the preglomerular vasculature and, so, release of nitric oxide and perhaps products of cytochrome P450-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism, which, in turn, drive the cascade of events that inhibit sodium reabsorption. 5.,Central to the arguments underlying these opposing hypotheses is the extent to which MBF is autoregulated. This remains highly controversial, largely because of the limitations of presently available methods for measurement of MBF. [source]


    GOVERNMENTALITY, LANGUAGE IDEOLOGY, AND THE PRODUCTION OF NEEDS IN MALAGASY CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT

    CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 2 2007
    PAUL W. HANSON
    Integrated conservation and development program planning pivots on a critical exchange. In establishing protected areas, part of the subsistence base of resident people is enclosed. Residents are then offered assistance in meeting needs emerging from the enclosure. The elicitation and interpretation of need in such programs forms a technology of governance. This article analyzes differing linguistic ideologies underpinning needs production in Madagascar's Ranomafana National Park Project, arguing that the technology of needs production is part of a green neoliberal rationality through which the Malagasy state and its citizens are being transformed, and from which an increasingly sophisticated countergovernmentality grows. [source]


    STRETCHING DISTRICT NURSING SERVICES TO MEET RURAL NEEDS

    AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 6 2001
    Katrina Alford
    ABSTRACT: This article evaluates the adequacy of District Nursing Service (DNS) provision in the Goulburn Murray region in Victoria. It draws on a survey of the region's DNS and communication with several community health agencies in response to problems identified by service providers. The results suggest that these rural health services face problems not experienced in urban areas. District nurses in rural areas have to travel far and wide to accommodate their clients and they put in extra unpaid hours if necessary. Their travel time, management and communication skills are not sufficiently recognised in the current funding formula. Although this includes some weighting for rurality, it is insufficient for District Nursing Services catering for smaller, more dispersed populations. Current and future demand pressures on home and community-based nursing services highlight the importance of redressing this deficiency. Several issues raised in this article may reflect problems that are common in rural regions, including funding inadequacies, unpaid additional work, access and equity difficulties and boundary issues. As a result, recommendations to improve service delivery may have broader applicability. [source]


    THE CROSS-CULTURAL IMPORTANCE OF SATISFYING VITAL NEEDS

    BIOETHICS, Issue 9 2009
    ALLEN ANDREW A. ALVAREZ
    ABSTRACT Ethical beliefs may vary across cultures but there are things that must be valued as preconditions to any cultural practice. Physical and mental abilities vital to believing, valuing and practising a culture are such preconditions and it is always important to protect them. If one is to practise a distinct culture, she must at least have these basic abilities. Access to basic healthcare is one way to ensure that vital abilities are protected. John Rawls argued that access to all-purpose primary goods must be ensured. Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum claim that universal capabilities are what resources are meant to enable. Len Doyal and Ian Gough identify physical health and autonomy as basic needs of every person in every culture. When we disagree on what to prioritize, when resources to satisfy competing demands are scarce, our common needs can provide a point of normative convergence. Need-based rationing, however, has been criticized for being too indeterminate to give guidance for deciding which healthcare services to prioritize and for tending to create a bottomless-pit problem. But there is a difference between needing something (first-order need) and needing to have the ability to need (second-order need). Even if we disagree about which first-order need to prioritize, we must accept the importance of satisfying our second-order need to have the ability to value things. We all have a second-order need for basic healthcare as a means to protect our vital abilities even if we differ in what our cultures consider to be particular first-order needs. [source]


    The CCA core specification in a distributed memory SPMD framework

    CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 5 2002
    Benjamin A. Allan
    Abstract We present an overview of the Common Component Architecture (CCA) core specification and CCAFFEINE, a Sandia National Laboratories framework implementation compliant with the draft specification. CCAFFEINE stands for CCA Fast Framework Example In Need of Everything; that is, CCAFFEINE is fast, lightweight, and it aims to provide every framework service by using external, portable components instead of integrating all services into a single, heavy framework core. By fast, we mean that the CCAFFEINE glue does not get between components in a way that slows down their interactions. We present the CCAFFEINE solutions to several fundamental problems in the application of component software approaches to the construction of single program multiple data (SPMD) applications. We demonstrate the integration of components from three organizations, two within Sandia and one at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We outline some requirements for key enabling facilities needed for a successful component approach to SPMD application building. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    To Explant or Not to Explant: An Invasive and Noninvasive Monitoring Protocol to Determine the Need of Continued Ventricular Assist Device Support

    CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE, Issue 2 2009
    Satoru Osaki MD
    Predictors of myocardial recovery after ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation are not well defined. The authors report their current VAD weaning protocol. Between 2003 and 2006, 38 patients received VAD implants. The authors performed 5 tests in 4 patients in whom echocardiography findings suggested myocardial recovery after implant. The protocol consists of assessing symptoms, electrocardiographic findings, hemodynamics, and cardiac function at baseline and as VAD support is weaned. As a result, 3 patients passed the weaning protocol and were explanted. There has been no recurrence of heart failure 667, 752, and 1007 days after explant, respectively. One patient failed the protocol after 151 days of support because of low cardiac index during the protocol. This patient was transplanted. This current experience of VAD weaning protocol is a novel tool to identify candidates for successful VAD explantation. [source]


    Do the Politics of Difference Need to be Freed of a Liberalism?

    CONSTELLATIONS: AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CRITICAL AND DEMOCRATIC THEORY, Issue 2 2001
    Jeffrey Hoover
    First page of article [source]


    K. P. Aleaz, 'The Christian Theology of Religion's Need to Go Global'.

    CONVERSATIONS IN RELIGION & THEOLOGY, Issue 2 2003
    Reply to author's response from the last issue
    [source]


    The added risk of opioid problem use among treatment-seeking youth with marijuana and/or alcohol problem use

    ADDICTION, Issue 4 2010
    Geetha A. Subramaniam
    Abstract Objectives To determine the added risk of opioid problem use (OPU) in youth with marijuana/alcohol problem use (MAPU). Methods A total of 475 youth (ages 14,21 years) with OPU + MAPU were compared to a weighted sample of 475 youth with MAPU only (i.e. no OPU) before and after propensity score matching on gender, age, race, level of care and weekly use of marijuana/alcohol. Youth were recruited from 88 drug treatment sites participating in eight Center for Substance Abuse Treatment-funded grants. At treatment intake, participants were administered the Global Appraisal of Individual Need to elicit information on demographic, social, substance, mental health, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), physical and legal characteristics. Odds ratios with confidence intervals were calculated. Results The added risk of OPU among MAPU youth was associated with greater comorbidity; higher rates of psychiatric symptoms and trauma/victimization; greater needle use and sex-related HIV risk behaviours; and greater physical distress. The OPU + MAPU group was less likely to be African American or other race and more likely to be aged 15,17 years, Caucasian; report weekly drug use at home and among peers; engage in illegal behaviors and be confined longer; have greater substance abuse severity and polydrug use; and use mental health and substance abuse treatment services. Conclusions These findings expand upon the existing literature and highlight the substantial incremental risk of OPU on multiple comorbid areas among treatment-seeking youth. Further evaluation is needed to assess their outcomes following standard drug treatment and to evaluate specialized interventions for this subgroup of severely impaired youth. [source]


    Institutional Theory and Entrepreneurship: Where Are We Now and Where Do We Need to Move in the Future?

    ENTREPRENEURSHIP THEORY AND PRACTICE, Issue 3 2010
    Garry D. Bruton
    Institutional theory is an increasingly utilized theoretical lens for entrepreneurship research. However, while institutional theory has proven highly useful, its use has reached a point that there is a need to establish a clearer understanding of its wide-ranging application to entrepreneurship research. Therefore, we will initially review the existing entrepreneurship literature that employs institutional theory to both understand the current status of the field, its current shortcomings, and where we need to move in the future. We then summarize and discuss the articles in this special issue and how they contribute to this process of advancing institutional theory and its application in entrepreneurship research. [source]


    Stopping Antiepileptic Drugs after Successful Surgery: What Do We Know? and What Do We Still Need to Learn?

    EPILEPSIA, Issue 2 2004
    Anne T. Berg
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Fluctuating Asymmetry of Responders Affects Offers in the Ultimatum Game Oppositely According to Attractiveness or Need as Perceived by Proposers

    ETHOLOGY, Issue 7 2009
    Darine Zaatari
    The Ultimatum Game (UG) measures cooperative tendencies in humans. A proposer offers to split a given sum of money between self and a responder, who may accept or reject the offer. If accepted, each receives the proposed split; if rejected, nobody receives anything. We studied the effect of the putative responder's degree of facial symmetry (fluctuating asymmetry, FA) on the offer he/she received in opposite-sexed UGs. Symmetry is an important measure of biological quality so subjects were expected to receive higher offers when symmetrical than asymmetrical. In a sample of Jamaicans, individuals played two UGs with opposite-sexed responders, a symmetrical photo of a Lebanese and an asymmetrical one. Individuals do indeed give more to symmetrical responders (p = 0.032). When subjects are asked their motivation, a striking dichotomy emerges: those who cite ,attractiveness' as a motive, give strongly to symmetrical responders while those citing ,need' invariably give more to asymmetrical ones (p < 0.0001). Females also show a nearly significant tendency to cite need as a motive more often than do males. [source]