Neurologic Signs (neurologic + sign)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Neurologic Dysfunction in Hypothyroid, Hyperlipidemic Labrador Retrievers

JOURNAL OF VETERINARY INTERNAL MEDICINE, Issue 6 2007
Christina L. Vitale
Background: Hypothyroidism has been associated with a variety of neurologic signs, but the mechanism for this association is not completely understood. Hypothyroidism also is associated with hyperlipidemia that predisposes to atherosclerosis, increased blood viscosity, and thromboembolic events. Objective: The objective is to characterize neurologic signs potentially associated with hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in canine hypothyroidism. Animals: This study used dogs referred to North Carolina State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation of neurologic signs. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in which medical records of dogs with neurologic signs and a diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperlipidemia were reviewed. Details of the history, presenting signs, results of routine blood tests, thyroid tests, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and diagnostic imaging, and response to therapy were compiled. Results: Three Labrador Retrievers and one Labrador Retriever cross fit the inclusion criteria. All dogs were hypothyroid and severely hyperlipidemic. Neurologic signs included tetraparesis, central and peripheral vestibular signs, facial paralysis, and paraparesis. Two dogs had an acute history and rapid resolution of signs consistent with an infarct, the presence of which was confirmed in 1 of the dogs by magnetic resonance imaging. Two dogs had chronic histories of cranial neuropathies and paraparesis. One of these dogs had evidence of iliac thrombosis and atherosclerosis on ultrasound examination. All dogs improved with thyroid hormone supplementation. Clinical Relevance: Labrador Retrievers may be predisposed to the development of severe hyperlipidemia in association with hypothyroidism. One possible consequence of severe hyperlipidemia is the development of neurologic signs due to atherosclerosis and thromboembolic events. [source]


Neurologic signs and symptoms in fibromyalgia

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 9 2009
Nathaniel F. Watson
Objective To determine the type and frequency of neurologic signs and symptoms in individuals with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods Persons with FM (n = 166) and pain-free controls (n = 66) underwent systematic neurologic examination by a neurologist blinded to disease status. Neurologic symptoms lasting at least 3 months were assessed with a standard questionnaire. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of neurologic symptoms and examination findings with FM status. Within the FM group we examined the correlation between self-reported symptoms and physical examination findings. Results Age- and sex-adjusted estimates revealed that compared with the control group, the FM group had significantly more neurologic abnormalities in multiple categories, including greater dysfunction in cranial nerves IX and X (42% versus 8%) and more sensory (65% versus 25%), motor (33% versus 3%), and gait (28% versus 7%) abnormalities. Similarly, the FM group had significantly more neurologic symptoms than the control group in 27 of 29 categories, with the greatest differences observed for photophobia (70% versus 6%), poor balance (63% versus 4%), and weakness (58% versus 2%) and tingling (54% versus 4%) in the arms or legs. Poor balance or coordination, tingling or weakness in the arms or legs, and numbness in any part of the body correlated with appropriate neurologic examination findings in the FM group. Conclusion This blinded, controlled study demonstrated neurologic physical examination findings in persons with FM. The FM group had more neurologic symptoms than did the controls, with moderate correlation between symptoms and signs. These findings have implications for the medical evaluation of patients with FM. [source]


Motor nervous system impairment persists in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

CANCER, Issue 9 2002
Satu S. Lehtinen M.D.
Abstract BACKGROUND The objective of the current study was to determine whether therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) results in long-lasting neurologic signs or electrophysiologic injuries within the motor tracts. METHODS Twenty-seven children who were treated for ALL were studied clinically 5 years after the cessation of therapy by means of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by magnetic stimulation transcranially and peripherally. An equal number of healthy children matched with regard to age, gender, and height served as the control group. RESULTS The MEP latencies to the hands and legs elicited by stimulation at the cortex were prolonged significantly in the children treated for ALL compared with the control group, with the differences being 2.2 milliseconds [ms] (P < 0.001) from the cortex to the thenar on the right side and 2.0 ms (P < 0.001) on the left, and 1.4 ms (P = 0.004) from the cortex to the leg on the right side and 1.3 ms (P = 0.004) on the left. Correspondingly, the MEP latency from the fifth lumbar vertebrae (LV) level to the leg also was prolonged, by 1.0 ms (P = 0.005) on the right side and 0.8 ms (P = 0.005) on the left side. The calculated latency between the cortex and the LV level was not found to be significantly longer in those patients treated for ALL compared with the healthy controls. Neurologic signs, in the form of depressed deep tendon reflexes, were observed in 8% of the patients, whereas approximately 33% of the patients were found to have fine or gross motor difficulties and dysdiadochokinesia. CONCLUSIONS Neurologic signs still persisted 5 years after therapy for ALL. Approximately 33% of the patients had fine or gross motor difficulties and dysdiadochokinesia, and demyelinative injuries to the peripheral nerve tracts were found proximally but not within the central nervous system. Cancer 2002;94:2466,73. 2002 American Cancer Society. DOI 10.1002/cncr.10503 [source]


Neurologic Dysfunction in Hypothyroid, Hyperlipidemic Labrador Retrievers

JOURNAL OF VETERINARY INTERNAL MEDICINE, Issue 6 2007
Christina L. Vitale
Background: Hypothyroidism has been associated with a variety of neurologic signs, but the mechanism for this association is not completely understood. Hypothyroidism also is associated with hyperlipidemia that predisposes to atherosclerosis, increased blood viscosity, and thromboembolic events. Objective: The objective is to characterize neurologic signs potentially associated with hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in canine hypothyroidism. Animals: This study used dogs referred to North Carolina State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for evaluation of neurologic signs. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in which medical records of dogs with neurologic signs and a diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperlipidemia were reviewed. Details of the history, presenting signs, results of routine blood tests, thyroid tests, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and diagnostic imaging, and response to therapy were compiled. Results: Three Labrador Retrievers and one Labrador Retriever cross fit the inclusion criteria. All dogs were hypothyroid and severely hyperlipidemic. Neurologic signs included tetraparesis, central and peripheral vestibular signs, facial paralysis, and paraparesis. Two dogs had an acute history and rapid resolution of signs consistent with an infarct, the presence of which was confirmed in 1 of the dogs by magnetic resonance imaging. Two dogs had chronic histories of cranial neuropathies and paraparesis. One of these dogs had evidence of iliac thrombosis and atherosclerosis on ultrasound examination. All dogs improved with thyroid hormone supplementation. Clinical Relevance: Labrador Retrievers may be predisposed to the development of severe hyperlipidemia in association with hypothyroidism. One possible consequence of severe hyperlipidemia is the development of neurologic signs due to atherosclerosis and thromboembolic events. [source]


Meningioangiomatosis in Young Dogs: A Case Series and Literature Review

JOURNAL OF VETERINARY INTERNAL MEDICINE, Issue 4 2004
Todd M. Bishop
Meningioangiomatosis (MA) is a proliferative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) that has been reported rarely in humans and sporadically in dogs. Meningioangiomatosis may occur in the brainstem or cervical spinal cord of young dogs and can be identified tentatively by magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic hallmark of MA is a leptomeningeal plaque that extends along the CNS microvasculature and invades the adjacent neural parenchyma. This case series describes the neurologic signs, clinical progression, diagnostic imaging, and neuropathology of 4 dogs with MA. The 4 dogs with MA are compared and contrasted with 4 previously reported cases in dogs as well as with their human counterpart. [source]


Micturitional disturbance in a patient with a spinal cavernous angioma

NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS, Issue 6 2003
Ryuji Sakakibara
Abstract A 58-year-old woman had a 3-year history of numbness in the right leg, which developed into thoracic transverse myelopathy and urinary retention. After referral to our department, MRI scans revealed a lesion with a target appearance at the T10,11 spinal cord with multiple silent cerebral lesions, which confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous angioma. Gamma-knife surgery was not indicated, considering the risk of adverse effects. The patient gradually became able to urinate, but had urge urinary incontinence. The first urodynamic studies (conducted 3 months after full clinical manifestations of transverse myelopathy) showed detrusor hyperreflexia (DH), decreased bladder sensation during bladder filling, detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD), and weak detrusor on voiding. However, urinary retention appeared again without change of neurologic signs. The second urodynamic studies (conducted 2 months later) showed less marked DH during bladder filling, and equivocal DSD but marked weak detrusor on voiding. The patient started taking oral prazosin hydrochloride (6 mg/day), which gradually ameliorated her voiding difficulty. Lesions in the lateral and dorsal columns of the spinal cord seem to be responsible for the micturitional disturbance in our patient with spinal cavernous angioma. Neurourol. Urodynam. 22:606,610, 2003. 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis with preceding neurologic signs and neutrophilia

PEDIATRICS INTERNATIONAL, Issue 2 2000
Kohsuke Yamamoto
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Brain involvement in rheumatoid arthritis: A magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 11 2009
Bart J. Emmer
Objective Tumor necrosis factor , was recently implicated as an important mediator of communication between the peripheral and cerebral immune systems in an animal model of chronic inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) the influence of inflammation on cerebral metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Single-voxel 1H-MRS of the centrum semiovale was performed on 35 RA patients (6 men and 29 women; mean SD age 51.8 14.6 years) and 28 healthy age- and sex-matched control subjects (9 men and 19 women; mean SD age 50.2 10.4 years). None of the study subjects had any neurologic signs or symptoms. Clinical markers of disease activity were correlated with the 1H-MRS findings. Results Patients with active RA, as reflected by an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), had a significantly higher ratio of choline to creatine and a significantly lower ratio of N -acetylaspartate to choline than did patients with inactive RA, as reflected by a normal ESR. Moreover, the ratios of choline to creatine and NAA to choline were significantly correlated with the ESR after correction for age, sex, smoking status, handedness, alcohol consumption, medication use, and disease duration. Medication use had no additional effect on these associations. Conclusion Our data show that systemic inflammation in RA is associated with metabolic changes in the brain. [source]


Neurologic signs and symptoms in fibromyalgia

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 9 2009
Nathaniel F. Watson
Objective To determine the type and frequency of neurologic signs and symptoms in individuals with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods Persons with FM (n = 166) and pain-free controls (n = 66) underwent systematic neurologic examination by a neurologist blinded to disease status. Neurologic symptoms lasting at least 3 months were assessed with a standard questionnaire. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of neurologic symptoms and examination findings with FM status. Within the FM group we examined the correlation between self-reported symptoms and physical examination findings. Results Age- and sex-adjusted estimates revealed that compared with the control group, the FM group had significantly more neurologic abnormalities in multiple categories, including greater dysfunction in cranial nerves IX and X (42% versus 8%) and more sensory (65% versus 25%), motor (33% versus 3%), and gait (28% versus 7%) abnormalities. Similarly, the FM group had significantly more neurologic symptoms than the control group in 27 of 29 categories, with the greatest differences observed for photophobia (70% versus 6%), poor balance (63% versus 4%), and weakness (58% versus 2%) and tingling (54% versus 4%) in the arms or legs. Poor balance or coordination, tingling or weakness in the arms or legs, and numbness in any part of the body correlated with appropriate neurologic examination findings in the FM group. Conclusion This blinded, controlled study demonstrated neurologic physical examination findings in persons with FM. The FM group had more neurologic symptoms than did the controls, with moderate correlation between symptoms and signs. These findings have implications for the medical evaluation of patients with FM. [source]


Motor nervous system impairment persists in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

CANCER, Issue 9 2002
Satu S. Lehtinen M.D.
Abstract BACKGROUND The objective of the current study was to determine whether therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) results in long-lasting neurologic signs or electrophysiologic injuries within the motor tracts. METHODS Twenty-seven children who were treated for ALL were studied clinically 5 years after the cessation of therapy by means of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by magnetic stimulation transcranially and peripherally. An equal number of healthy children matched with regard to age, gender, and height served as the control group. RESULTS The MEP latencies to the hands and legs elicited by stimulation at the cortex were prolonged significantly in the children treated for ALL compared with the control group, with the differences being 2.2 milliseconds [ms] (P < 0.001) from the cortex to the thenar on the right side and 2.0 ms (P < 0.001) on the left, and 1.4 ms (P = 0.004) from the cortex to the leg on the right side and 1.3 ms (P = 0.004) on the left. Correspondingly, the MEP latency from the fifth lumbar vertebrae (LV) level to the leg also was prolonged, by 1.0 ms (P = 0.005) on the right side and 0.8 ms (P = 0.005) on the left side. The calculated latency between the cortex and the LV level was not found to be significantly longer in those patients treated for ALL compared with the healthy controls. Neurologic signs, in the form of depressed deep tendon reflexes, were observed in 8% of the patients, whereas approximately 33% of the patients were found to have fine or gross motor difficulties and dysdiadochokinesia. CONCLUSIONS Neurologic signs still persisted 5 years after therapy for ALL. Approximately 33% of the patients had fine or gross motor difficulties and dysdiadochokinesia, and demyelinative injuries to the peripheral nerve tracts were found proximally but not within the central nervous system. Cancer 2002;94:2466,73. 2002 American Cancer Society. DOI 10.1002/cncr.10503 [source]