Neuroepithelial Tumor (neuroepithelial + tumor)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Angiocentric Neuroepithelial Tumor (ANET): A New Epilepsy-Related Clinicopathological Entity with Distinctive MRI

BRAIN PATHOLOGY, Issue 4 2005
Arielle Lellouch-Tubiana MD
Several types of glioneuronal tumors are known to induce intractable partial seizures in children and adults. The most frequent are dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs) and gangliogliomas. We report here a new clinicopathological entity within the spectrum of glioneuronal tumors observed in 10 children who underwent surgery for refractory epilepsy. These tumors demonstrate a unique, pathognomonic histological pattern and a specific appearance at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The most striking neuropathological feature is an angiocentric polarity of the tumor with gliofibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive fusiform and bipolar astrocytic cells arranged around blood vessels (perivascular cuffing with tumoral astrocytes). Characteristic MRI findings include involvement of cortical gray and white matter, intrinsically high signal on T1-weighted images, as well as a stalk like extension to the ventricle. Immunohistochemical neuronal markers (neurofilament protein, synaptophysin and chromogranin) confirm the presence of a neuronal cell component. Therefore, the term angiocentric neuroepithelial tumor (ANET) is proposed. [source]


PNET-like features of synovial sarcoma of the lung: A pitfall in the cytologic diagnosis of soft-tissue tumors

DIAGNOSTIC CYTOPATHOLOGY, Issue 4 2001
Pascale Hummel M.D.
Abstract Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology of soft-tissue tumors is evolving. As more experience is gained, we are becoming aware of potential pitfalls. We describe 2 cases of synovial sarcoma of the lung, primary and metastatic, in patients who had FNA biopsy performed on a lung mass. The cytologic smears showed extremely cellular groups of malignant small round cells, intersected by small blood vessels, with numerous loose single cells, in a background of macrophages and mature lymphocytes. The tumors displayed monomorphic cells forming rosettes and displaying occasional mitoses. A diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumor/primitive neuroepithelial tumor (PNET) was suspected. Furthermore, this suspicion was supported by immunohistochemical stains, which showed positivity for a neuroendocrine marker, Leu 7 (case 1), and for a neural marker, CD 99 (O 13 or HBA 71) (both cases); and negativity for cytokeratins (case 1). The resection specimen of case 1 had mostly tightly packed small round cells, with occasional rosettes, similar to the FNA biopsy, and focal areas composed of spindle cells, organized in a focal fibrosarcoma-like and hemangiopericytoma-like pattern. A balanced translocation between chromosomes X and 18, demonstrated by both karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), enabled us to make a diagnosis of synovial sarcoma, which was histologically classified as poorly differentiated. Case 2 was a metastatic biphasic synovial sarcoma of the arm, with a prominent epithelial component. Synovial sarcoma, when composed mainly of small round cells on cytologic smears, is a great mimicker of neuroendocrine/PNET tumors, with light microscopic and immunohistochemical overlap. Awareness of this potential pitfall may aid in preventing a misdiagnosis. Its recognition is of major concern, especially for the poorly differentiated variant, because it is associated with a worse prognosis. Diagn. Cytopathol. 24:283,288, 2001. 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Multifocal dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor with signs of atypia after regrowth

NEUROPATHOLOGY, Issue 4 2007
Jens Schittenhelm
We report the case of a multifocal dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT) in a 7-year-old girl with local tumor regrowth 6 years later. The tumor was localized in the right parietal lobe extending from the cortex into the periventricular white matter. After subtotal resection of a histopathologically confirmed DNT we observed unexpected tumor progression in long-term follow-up. Therefore, a second surgery was performed when the patient was 14 years of age. In neuropathological examination of the second specimen the tumor showed an increased cellularity and pleomorphism, microvascular proliferations, an elevated proliferative activity (MIB1-index focally up to 10%) and cellular atypia not typical for WHO grade I DNT. Furthermore, MRI studies showed additional supratentorial and infratentorial lesions which remained stable over years and are also well consistent with DNTs. Thus, an unusual form of a DNT with multifocal lesions, local regrowth and morphological transformation is supposed. [source]


Astroblastoma: Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study of distinctive epithelial and probable tanycytic differentiation

NEUROPATHOLOGY, Issue 1 2006
Toshihiko Kubota
We report the clinicopathological findings of astroblastoma found in an 8-year-old girl who was subsequently treated for 11 years. The primary superficially circumscribed tumor was located in the frontoparietal lobe, while the recurrent and the second recurrent tumor were restricted to the same region 11 years later. The tumors obtained on these three occasions showed fundamentally the same histological, immunohistochemical and fine structural features. They exhibited astrocytic as well as ependymal tanycytic features with apparent epithelial cell lineage. The tumor cells showed typical features of astroblastoma comprising prominent perivascular pseudorosettes with remarkable vascular sclerosis. The immunohistochemical study revealed intensive positivity of GFAP, vimentin, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), cytokeratin, connexin 26 and 32, desmocollin 1 and neuronal cadherin. The fine structure revealed divergent types of junctional complexes, some of which were connected with tonofilament bundles. Numerous microvilli protruded and basal lamina abutted on the tumor cell surface. We report these unique histological features, and stress that astroblastoma should be categorized as a specific type of neuroepithelial tumor. [source]


Astroblastoma: Report of a case with microsatellite analysis

NEUROPATHOLOGY, Issue 3 2000
Shanop Shuangshoti
A 5-year-old girl who developed progressive headache, vomiting, and left hemiparesis was found to have a cystic tumor with an enhanced mural nodule in the right frontoparietal region on a computed tomography examination. The lesion was histologically and ultrastructurally verified as an astroblastoma, an uncommon neuroepithelial tumor of uncertain origin. Molecular analysis using 17 microsatellite markers on chromosomes 9, 10, 11, 17, 19, and 22 showed loss of heterozygosity at the D19S412 locus on the long arm of chromsome 19. This observation suggests that there is a tumor suppressor gene in this chromosomal region, which plays a role in the pathogenesis of astroblastoma. [source]


Angiocentric Neuroepithelial Tumor (ANET): A New Epilepsy-Related Clinicopathological Entity with Distinctive MRI

BRAIN PATHOLOGY, Issue 4 2005
Arielle Lellouch-Tubiana MD
Several types of glioneuronal tumors are known to induce intractable partial seizures in children and adults. The most frequent are dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs) and gangliogliomas. We report here a new clinicopathological entity within the spectrum of glioneuronal tumors observed in 10 children who underwent surgery for refractory epilepsy. These tumors demonstrate a unique, pathognomonic histological pattern and a specific appearance at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The most striking neuropathological feature is an angiocentric polarity of the tumor with gliofibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive fusiform and bipolar astrocytic cells arranged around blood vessels (perivascular cuffing with tumoral astrocytes). Characteristic MRI findings include involvement of cortical gray and white matter, intrinsically high signal on T1-weighted images, as well as a stalk like extension to the ventricle. Immunohistochemical neuronal markers (neurofilament protein, synaptophysin and chromogranin) confirm the presence of a neuronal cell component. Therefore, the term angiocentric neuroepithelial tumor (ANET) is proposed. [source]


A case of melanotic desmoplastic ganglioglioma

NEUROPATHOLOGY, Issue 5 2009
Manila Antonelli
We describe a case of desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma (DIG) in a 9-month-old boy located in the temporal lobe. Grossly the tumor was brown and superficially located. Histologically the tumor contained pigment in numerous neoplastic cells, shown to be melanosomal melanin by ultrastructural examination. Pigmented neoplasms have been reported at various sites in the central and peripheral nervous system. Previous reports on pigmented neuroepithelial tumors include neoplasms containing melanin, while others have contained neuromelanin and or lipofuscin. This case represents the first description of pigmented neoplastic cells in DIG, enlarging the spectrum of pigmented primary CNS tumors. [source]


Angiocentric Neuroepithelial Tumor (ANET): A New Epilepsy-Related Clinicopathological Entity with Distinctive MRI

BRAIN PATHOLOGY, Issue 4 2005
Arielle Lellouch-Tubiana MD
Several types of glioneuronal tumors are known to induce intractable partial seizures in children and adults. The most frequent are dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNETs) and gangliogliomas. We report here a new clinicopathological entity within the spectrum of glioneuronal tumors observed in 10 children who underwent surgery for refractory epilepsy. These tumors demonstrate a unique, pathognomonic histological pattern and a specific appearance at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The most striking neuropathological feature is an angiocentric polarity of the tumor with gliofibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive fusiform and bipolar astrocytic cells arranged around blood vessels (perivascular cuffing with tumoral astrocytes). Characteristic MRI findings include involvement of cortical gray and white matter, intrinsically high signal on T1-weighted images, as well as a stalk like extension to the ventricle. Immunohistochemical neuronal markers (neurofilament protein, synaptophysin and chromogranin) confirm the presence of a neuronal cell component. Therefore, the term angiocentric neuroepithelial tumor (ANET) is proposed. [source]