Myelomonocytic Leukaemia (myelomonocytic + leukaemia)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Myelomonocytic Leukaemia

  • chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia
  • juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia


  • Selected Abstracts


    Mixed-lineage eosinophil/basophil crisis in MDS: a rare form of progression

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL INVESTIGATION, Issue 6 2008
    F. Wimazal
    ABSTRACT Background, Basophilic crisis and eosinophilia are well recognized features of advanced chronic myeloid leukaemia. In other myeloid neoplasms, however, transformation with marked basophilia and eosinophilia is considered unusual. Design, We examined the long-term follow-up of 322 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) to define the frequency of basophilic, eosinophilic and mixed lineage (basophilic and eosinophilic) transformation. Results, Of all patients, only one developed mixed lineage crisis (, 20% basophils and , 20% eosinophils). In this patient, who initially suffered from chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia, basophils increased to 48% and eosinophils up to 31% at the time of progression. Mixed lineage crisis was not accompanied by an increase in blast cells or organomegaly. The presence of BCR/ABL and other relevant fusion gene products (FIP1L1/PDGFRA, AML1/ETO, PML/RAR,, CBF,/MYH11) were excluded by PCR. Myelomastocytic transformation/myelomastocytic leukaemia and primary mast cell disease were excluded by histology, KIT mutation analysis, electron microscopy and immunophenotyping. Basophils were thus found to be CD123+, CD203c+, BB1+, KIT- cells, and to express a functional IgE-receptor. Among the other patients with MDS examined, 4(1·2%) were found to have marked basophilia (, 20%) and 7(2·1%) were found to have massive eosinophilia ( , 20%), whereas mixed-lineage crisis was detected in none of them. Conclusions, Mixed basophil/eosinophil crisis may develop in patients with MDS but is an extremely rare event. [source]


    Response to erythropoietin in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia

    INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, Issue 6 2001
    I. Kerridge
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Evaluation of F cells in sickle cell disorders by flow cytometry , comparison with the Kleihauer,Betke's slide method

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF LABORATORY HEMATOLOGY, Issue 6 2007
    K. Y. ITALIA
    Summary Adult F cell numbers are raised in inherited haemoglobin disorders, such as , -thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia, hereditary persistence of foetal haemoglobin, and some acquired conditions, such as juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia, during acute erythropoietic stress and pregnancy. True foetal erythrocytes containing foetal amounts of HbF can also occur in the adult circulation during the leakage of HbF-containing cells from the foetus to the maternal circulation. In normal adults, HbF is restricted to a small proportion (3,7%) of red blood cells (RBC), termed ,F cells'. Techniques estimating the amount of HbF use lysates prepared from RBC, whereas those that estimate the adult F cell count use intact RBC. An accurate assessment of adult F cells in sickle cell disorders is important because increased adult F cells are associated with decreased morbidity in these disorders. In the present study, HbF levels were measured and adult F cell numbers were estimated in 100 blood samples (25 normal individuals, 25 sickle heterozygotes, 25 sickle homozygotes and 25 sickle , -thalassaemia cases), using high pressure liquid chromatography for HbF levels, and flow cytometry and the Kleihauer,Betke (KB) acid elution microscope slide method for cell counts. Flow cytometry gave a more accurate assessment of adult F cells, eliminating any manual error, as compared to KB, which was less sensitive and precise as it is based on subjective visual interpretation. [source]


    Acute myelomonocytic leukaemia with short-term spontaneous remission in a cat

    AUSTRALIAN VETERINARY JOURNAL, Issue 6 2008
    ME MYLONAKIS
    A 2-year-old, spayed female domestic shorthair cat was referred with a history of anorexia and depression of 1 week duration. On physical examination, the cat was lethargic and febrile, with splenomegaly, anisocoria and ulcerative stomatitis. A complete blood count (CBC) and a biochemistry profile showed leukocytosis, numerous blast cells in the peripheral blood, thrombocytopenia, hyperglobulinaemia and a positive test for feline leukaemia virus antigen. A diagnosis of acute myelomonocytic leukaemia was made on the basis of the results of bone marrow cytology, histopathology, and immunochemistry (CD3, CD79a, lysozyme, and myeloperoxidase) tests. Following an unexpected 1-month period of clinical and clinicopathological remission without chemotherapy, the cat relapsed and died 1 week later. [source]


    Leukaemia cutis with chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Issue 4 2009
    Shameem Mahmood
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Renal infiltration associated with chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Issue 4 2009
    Kichinosuke Kobayashi
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Spontaneous macrophage colony-forming units in juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Issue 2 2007
    François Girodon
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    JAK2 V617F Mutation is uncommon in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Issue 6 2005
    M. F. Johan
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Engraftment of NOD/SCID/,cnull mice with multilineage neoplastic cells from patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Issue 1 2005
    Yoichi Nakamura
    Summary Several lines of evidence indicate the clonal nature of juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML), involving myeloid, erythroid, megakaryocyte and B-lymphoid lineages. However, it is unclear whether the T-lymphocyte lineage is involved. We demonstrated that cells from six patients with JMML repopulated in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient/,cnull mice and differentiated into granulocytes, monocytes, erythrocytes, B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. The percentage of human CD45 antigen-positive cells ranged from 41% to 73% in the murine bone marrow 12 weeks after transplantation. To examine the involvement of lymphocyte subpopulations, we purified human CD3+, CD19+ and CD56+ cells from murine bone marrow cells transplanted from a patient with monosomy 7. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed the clonal marker in 96,100% of purified CD3+, CD19+ and CD56+ subpopulations. These findings support the concept that JMML originates in transplantable multilineage haematopoietic stem cells. This novel murine xenotransplant model should be useful for investigating the nature of stem cells and testing new therapies for patients with JMML. [source]


    Secondary haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (SHLH) occurring in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Issue 1 2004
    A. Marmont
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Aortic thrombus with Aspergillus in a patient with refractory acute myelomonocytic leukaemia

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Issue 6 2004
    H. Yamamoto
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Aberrant expression of HLA-G antigen in interferon ,-stimulated acute myelogenous leukaemia

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Issue 1 2000
    Shinichi Mizuno
    We have analysed the expression of HLA-G in 40 leukaemia samples of various subtypes [seven cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), 28 cases of acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML), three cases of chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) and two cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL)] by flow cytometry using HLA-G-specific monoclonal antibody. No leukaemia samples expressed HLA-G without incubation with interferon (IFN)-,. However, six out of 28 (21%) AML samples expressed HLA-G upon incubation with IFN-,. These six samples derived from one out of seven M2, two out of eight M4 and three out of five M5. The results indicated that AML cells, especially myelomonocytic leukaemia samples, are capable of expressing the HLA-G molecule. [source]


    A new PTPN11 mutation in juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia associated with Noonan syndrome

    ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 5 2005
    Lisa Giovannini
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]