Memory Complaints (memory + complaints)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Memory Complaints

  • subjective memory complaints


  • Selected Abstracts


    Do memory complaints represent impaired memory performance in patients with major depressive disorder?

    DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY, Issue 10 2008
    Arash Mowla M.D.
    Abstract Memory complaints are found to be associated with depression. However, the question is, "How much these subjective complaints indicate objective memory impairments?" The aim of this study is to determine whether subjective memory complaints represent objective memory impairments and to establish the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and subjective memory complaints. Sixty-four patients with MDD were assessed for objective memory performance through subtests of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III. Memory complaints also were assessed in these patients with a structured interview. Thirty healthy controls were also included in the study to compare memory performance among groups. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was used to measure the severity and characteristics of depression. Patients with MDD who had longer duration and earlier onset of depression reported more memory complaints. MDD patients with memory complaints had more hypochondriac concerns but not more depression severity compared with those without memory complaints. There was no relationship between subjective memory complaints and objective memory performance in MDD patients. Patients with MDD with and without memory complaints had lower scores on the Wechsler Memory Scale-III than the control group. Subjective memory complaints are not a valid indictor of objective memory impairments, and the diagnostic value of self-reported memory is being questioned in patients with MDD. The cognitive status of MDD patients should be assessed routinely, regardless of the patient awareness of his or her cognitive deficits. Depression and Anxiety, 2008. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Are cognitively intact seniors with subjective memory loss more likely to develop dementia?

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 9 2002
    Philip St John
    Abstract Background Subjective memory loss (SML) is common in elderly persons. It is not clear if SML predicts the development of dementia. Objectives (1) to determine if SML in those with normal cognition predicts dementia or cognitive impairment without dementia (CIND); (2) to determine if an association is independent of the effect of age, gender and depressive symptoms. Methods Secondary analysis of the Manitoba Study of Health and Aging (MSHA), a population-based prospective study. Data were collected in 1991, and follow-up was done 5 years later. Community-dwelling seniors sampled randomly from a population-based registry in the Canadian province of Manitoba, stratified on age and region. Only those scoring in the normal range of the Modified mini-mental state examination (3MS) were included. Predictor variables were self-reported memory loss, 3MS, Center for epidemiological studies,depression scale (CES-D), age, gender, and education. Outcomes were mortality and cognitive impairment five years later. Results In bivariate analyses, SML was associated with both death and dementia. In multivariate models, SML did not predict mortality. After adjusting for age, gender, and depressive symptoms, SML predicted dementia. However, after adjusting for baseline 3MS score, SML did not predict dementia. Conclusions Memory complaints predict the development of dementia over five years, and clinicians should monitor these persons closely. However, the proportion of persons developing dementia was small, and SML alone is unlikely to be a useful clinical predictor of dementia. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Do memory complaints represent impaired memory performance in patients with major depressive disorder?

    DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY, Issue 10 2008
    Arash Mowla M.D.
    Abstract Memory complaints are found to be associated with depression. However, the question is, "How much these subjective complaints indicate objective memory impairments?" The aim of this study is to determine whether subjective memory complaints represent objective memory impairments and to establish the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and subjective memory complaints. Sixty-four patients with MDD were assessed for objective memory performance through subtests of the Wechsler Memory Scale-III. Memory complaints also were assessed in these patients with a structured interview. Thirty healthy controls were also included in the study to compare memory performance among groups. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression was used to measure the severity and characteristics of depression. Patients with MDD who had longer duration and earlier onset of depression reported more memory complaints. MDD patients with memory complaints had more hypochondriac concerns but not more depression severity compared with those without memory complaints. There was no relationship between subjective memory complaints and objective memory performance in MDD patients. Patients with MDD with and without memory complaints had lower scores on the Wechsler Memory Scale-III than the control group. Subjective memory complaints are not a valid indictor of objective memory impairments, and the diagnostic value of self-reported memory is being questioned in patients with MDD. The cognitive status of MDD patients should be assessed routinely, regardless of the patient awareness of his or her cognitive deficits. Depression and Anxiety, 2008. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Risk factors for incident mild cognitive impairment , results from the German Study on Ageing, Cognition and Dementia in Primary Care Patients (AgeCoDe)

    ACTA PSYCHIATRICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 4 2010
    T. Luck
    Luck T, Riedel-Heller SG, Luppa M, Wiese B, Wollny A, Wagner M, Bickel H, Weyerer S, Pentzek M, Haller F, Moesch E, Werle J, Eisele M, Maier W, van den Bussche H, Kaduszkiewicz H for the AgeCoDe Study Group. Risk factors for incident mild cognitive impairment , results from the German Study on Ageing, Cognition and Dementia in Primary Care Patients (AgeCoDe). Objectives:, To provide age- and gender-specific incidence rates of MCI among elderly general practitioner (GP) patients (75+ years) and to identify risk factors for incident MCI. Method:, Data were derived from the longitudinal German Study on Ageing, Cognition and Dementia in Primary Care Patients (AgeCoDe). Incidence was calculated according to the ,person-years-at-risk' method. Risk factors were analysed using multivariate logistic regression models. Results:, During the 3-year follow-up period, 350 (15.0%) of the 2331 patients whose data were included in the calculation of incidence developed MCI [person-years (PY) = 6198.20]. The overall incidence of MCI was 56.5 (95% confidence interval = 50.7,62.7) per 1000 PY. Older age, vascular diseases, the apoE ,4 allele and subjective memory complaints were identified as significant risk factors for future MCI. Conclusion:, Mild cognitive impairment is frequent in older GP patients. Subjective memory complaints predict incident MCI. Especially vascular risk factors provide the opportunity of preventive approaches. [source]


    Depression, cognitive reserve and memory performance in older adults

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 7 2010
    Mike Murphy
    Abstract Objectives The purpose of this research study was to examine the relationship between education and leisure, as markers of cognitive reserve, depressive symptoms and memory performance in a sample of cognitively normal Irish older adults. Methods A cross-sectional survey style design was employed to gather data. A sample of 121 older adults in the Cork area was recruited through publicly advertising for volunteers. Only those volunteers who obtained a score of greater than 23 on the MMSE, and were not taking antidepressant or anxiolytic medications, were included. Data from 99 participants were included in the analysis. Results Controlling for age and gender, depressive symptoms were found to be associated with poorer immediate recall performance, while greater than 12 years of education was positively associated with delayed recall and savings. Leisure did not emerge as being associated with any of the dimensions of memory assessed. Conclusions Depressive symptoms emerged as associated with immediate recall, even though few of the participants met the cut-off for caseness. This may indicate a need for intervention in cases of subclinical depression with associated memory complaints. The association between education level and both delayed recall and savings provides support for the cognitive reserve hypothesis, and may suggest useful non-pharmacological approaches to memory deficits in later life. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    The clinical significance of subjective memory complaints in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment and dementia: a meta-analysis

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 11 2008
    Alex J. Mitchell
    Abstract Background Subjective memory complaints (SMC) are frequently reported by individuals with objective evidence of cognitive decline although the exact rate of complaints and their diagnostic value is uncertain. Method A meta-analysis was conducted for all studies examining SMC and either concurrent dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Results Eight studies reported the rate of SMC in dementia, seven studies reported the rate of SMC in MCI and of these four compared the rate of SMC in dementia and MCI head-to-head. SMC were present in 42.8% of those with dementia and 38.2% of those with MCI. Across all levels of cognitive impairments 39.8% of people had SMC compared with 17.4% in healthy elderly controls (Relative Risk 2.3). In head-to-head studies there was a significantly higher rate of SMC in dementia vs MCI (48.4% vs 35.1%). Examining the diagnostic value of SMC in dementia, the meta-analytic pooled sensitivity was 43.0% and specificity was 85.8%. For MCI, meta-analytic pooled sensitivity was 37.4% and specificity was 86.9%. In community studies with a low prevalence the positive and negative predictive values were 18.5% and 93.7% for dementia and 31.4% and 86.9% for MCI. The clinical utility index which calculates the value of a diagnostic method suggested ,poor' value for ruling in a diagnosis of dementia but ,good' value for ruling out a diagnosis. Conclusions When assessed by simple questions, SMC appear to be present in the minority of those with mild cognitive impairment and dementia. In cross-sectional community settings, even when people agree that they have SMC there is only a 20% or 30% chance that dementia or MCI are present, respectively. Despite this, the absence of SMC may be a reasonable method of excluding dementia and MCI and could be incorporated into short screening programs for dementia and MCI but replication is required in clinical settings. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Clustering and switching in semantic fluency: predictors of the development of Alzheimer's disease

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 10 2008
    Ana B. Fagundo
    Abstract Objective The aims of the study are twofold: (1) to compare semantic fluency, clustering and switching performance among subjects with memory complaints, patients with Alzheimer Disease (AD), and healthy controls; and (2) to examine the clinical utility of the clustering/switching scoring system in the prediction of incident AD in subjects with memory complaints. Methods A semantic fluency task was used to compare thirty eight subjects with memory complaints, forty two AD patients and twenty five healthy controls on the total number of words generated, clustering and switching performance. Subjects with memory complaints were followed-up for a maximum period of two years and re-evaluated. They remained in the memory complaints group (twenty eight subjects) or were defined as probable AD (ten subjects). Results AD patients generated fewer correct words (p,<,0.001) and showed a reduction in clustering (p,=,0.008) and switching (p,<,0.001). Subjects with memory complaints showed a significant reduction in correct words (p,<,0.001) and clustering performance (p,=,0.008) compare to controls. In the first evaluation, the subgroup of patients who converted to AD at follow up produced less correct words (p,<,0.01) and smaller clusters (p,=,0.007) than the subgroup who did not become demented. There were no differences in switching between these two subgroups. AD development was better predicted by cluster size than by the total number of words generated or by switching. Conclusions Subjects with memory complaints and AD patients have an alteration in both qualitative and quantitative aspects of semantic fluency. A clustering analysis could enhance the reliability of early AD diagnosis. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Do older adults presenting with memory complaints wish to be told if later diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease?

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 5 2006
    Paul Elson
    Abstract Background Many patients with Alzheimer's disease are not told their diagnosis. Studies have shown that relatives possess mixed views regarding whether or not patients should be told while elderly peers favour disclosure. Recent studies have shown that patients with diagnosed dementia also favour being told. The present study sought the views of patients prior to diagnosis. Method Participants were a consecutive sample of patients aged 65 and over suffering from memory complaints. They were asked what they considered to be causing their memory problems and whether or not they would want to know the cause. They were then specifically asked if they would want to know if diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and what were their reasons for this. Results Two-thirds of patients were uncertain regarding the cause of their memory difficulties although the remainder did offer some valid explanations. Eighty-six per cent wanted to know the cause while 69% wanted to know if diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and a variety of reasons were offered to support their preference. Conclusion The majority of older adults presenting to services with memory complaints had little understanding of the potential cause of their problems. Most were nevertheless keen to know the cause, even if this transpired to be Alzheimer's disease. The clinical implications of the findings are discussed and suggestions made for future research. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    No association between subjective memory complaints and apolipoprotein E genotype in cognitively intact elderly

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 12 2004
    Dylan G. Harwood
    Abstract Objective This cross-sectional study examined the relationship between subjective memory complaints and the apolipoprotein epsilon 4 allele (,4), a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), among cognitively normal subjects identified from a community memory screening. Design The sample comprised 232 consecutive white non-Hispanic older adults who presented to a free community-based memory-screening program at a University affiliated memory disorders center. Participants were classified as cognitively normal based on scores on the age and educated adjusted Folstein Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSAdj) and a brief Delayed Verbal Recall Test (DRT). Subjects were assessed for APOE genotype, subjective memory complaints (Memory Questionnaire, MQ), depressive symptoms (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, HDRS), and history of four major medical conditions that have been associated with memory loss (stroke/transient ischemic attack [TIA], atherosclerotic heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes). A hierarchical regression analysis was performed to examine the association between APOE genotype and memory complaints after controlling for a host of potential confounding factors. Results The APOE ,4 allele frequency for cognitively normal subjects was 0.13. Subjective memory complaints were predicted by depressive symptoms and a history of stroke/TIA. They were not associated with APOE genotype, MMSAdj score, DRT score, age, education, gender, and reported history of atherosclerotic heart disease, hypertension, or diabetes. Conclusion The results did not suggest an association between subjective memory complaints and the APOE ,4 allele in this sample of cognitively intact subjects. This indicates that memory complaints may confer risk for future dementia through pathways independent of APOE genotype. The results also show that older adults with memory complaints are at increased risk for underlying depression. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    EEG synchronization in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    ACTA NEUROLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 2 2003
    C. J. Stam
    Objectives , To compute the synchronization likelihood of multichannel electroencephalogram (EEG) data in Alzheimer (AD) patients, subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and subjects with subjective memory complaints (SC). Material and methods , EEGs (200 Hz sample frequency; 21 channels; average reference) were recorded in 10 AD patients (two males; age 76.2; SD 9.36; range 59,86), 17 subjects with MCI (eight males; age 77.41; SD 6.25; range 62,88) and 20 subjects with SCI (11 males; age 68.9; SD 12.96; range: 51,89). The synchronization likelihood, a novel type of coherence measure, was computed, comparing each channel with all other channels, for the 2,6, 6,10, 10,14, 14,18, 18,22 and 22,50 Hz band. Results , The synchronization likelihood was significantly decreased in the 14,18 and 18,22 Hz band in AD patients compared with both MCI subjects and healthy controls. Lower beta band synchronization correlated with lower Mini-Mental state examination (MMSE) scores. Conclusion , Loss of beta band synchronization occurs early in mildly affected AD patients and correlates with cognitive impairment. [source]