Media Campaigns (media + campaign)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Effectiveness of a Media Campaign to Reduce

JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 3 2006
Traffic Crashes Involving Young Drivers
This article describes the evaluation of a 4-1/2-month multimedia traffic-safety campaign that targeted young drivers in northeastern Tennessee. Discussion groups with teenagers provided the basis for public-service announcements (TV, radio, and billboard), which were developed specifically for this intervention. To determine the impact on crash frequencies among drivers 16,19 years old, baseline, intervention, and follow-up crash data were obtained from statistics maintained by the state. A time-series analysis of these data indicated that during the intervention period, there was a 21.6% decrease in crashes for which 16,19-year-old drivers were at fault, whereas a control location in southeastern Tennessee exhibited no significant change. [source]


Improving media campaigns promoting physical activity: the underutilized role of gender

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 3 2008
Dan J. Graham
As the obesity epidemic worsens in the United States and globally, resources are increasingly being allocated to address this public health threat. Media campaigns promoting physical activity are receiving funding from government and private sources, and some of these campaigns have achieved modest success. Still, more can be done to increase the effectiveness of these campaigns. Drawing on facets of consumer behavior, psychology, and public policy, this work represents a cross-disciplinary theoretical analysis suggesting that the effectiveness of media-based campaigns promoting physical activity could be enhanced by making use of gender-specific advertising. Research is reviewed suggesting that gender differences in information processing styles and values lead to gender-specific responses to media campaigns. Recommendations are made to help practitioners improve physical activity campaigns by crafting advertisements that specifically appeal to the unique preferences of each gender. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Environmental tobacco smoke in homes, motor vehicles and licensed premises: community attitudes and practices

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Issue 6 2002
Raoul A. Walsh
Objective: To assess community knowledge, attitudes and practices in relation to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) especially in homes, private motor vehicles and licensed premises, and to document levels of support for further government legislation. Methods: 656 persons aged 18 years and over, a sub-sample in a computer-assisted telephone survey of 2,087 randomly selected respondents across NSW, answered 12 ETS-specific questions The whole sample was asked demographic, smoking status and household membership questions. The overall response rate was 61.4% (consent rate 75.4%). Results: Overall, 32.8% (95% CI 27.8,37.8) of children aged 0,4 years in the households surveyed were reported to live with at least one smoker. Agreement about ETS hazards was lowest in relation to child ear problems (31.2%) and sudden infant death syndrome (50.6%). Complete bans on smoking were reported in 69.9% of homes and 77.1% of private motor vehicles The percentages favouring total bans in homes (p<0.001) and private motor vehicles (p<0.001) were significantly lower among smokers than non-smokers. Overall, 55.8% supported legislation to ban smoking in private vehicles carrying children. The majority support restrictions on smoking in non-eating areas of licensed clubs (88.7%) and hotels (84.8%). Overall, the data indicate a ban on smoking in licensed premises is likely to increase business. Conclusion: Smoking is banned in most NSW homes and private motor vehicles Acceptance of ETS risks is high but there are important knowledge gaps. Considerable support exists for further government regulation of ETS. Media campaigns are likely to reinforce a public environment already receptive of the need for more government ETS restrictions. [source]


Promoting Physical Activity Among Youth Through Community-Based Prevention Marketing

JOURNAL OF SCHOOL HEALTH, Issue 5 2010
Carol A. Bryant PhD
BACKGROUND: Community-based prevention marketing (CBPM) is a program planning framework that blends community-organizing principles with a social marketing mind-set to design, implement, and evaluate public health interventions. A community coalition used CBPM to create a physical activity promotion program for tweens (youth 9,13 years of age) called VERB‘ Summer Scorecard. Based on the national VERB‘ media campaign, the program offered opportunities for tweens to try new types of physical activity during the summer months. METHODS: The VERB‘ Summer Scorecard was implemented and monitored between 2004 and 2007 using the 9-step CBPM framework. Program performance was assessed through in-depth interviews and a school-based survey of youth. RESULTS: The CBPM process and principles used by school and community personnel to promote physical activity among tweens are presented. Observed declines may become less steep if school officials adopt a marketing mind-set to encourage youth physical activity: deemphasizing health benefits but promoting activity as something fun that fosters spending time with friends while trying and mastering new skills. CONCLUSIONS: Community-based programs can augment and provide continuity to school-based prevention programs to increase physical activity among tweens. [source]


Melanoma screening: results of the first one-day campaign in Belgium (,Melanoma Monday')

JOURNAL OF THE EUROPEAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY & VENEREOLOGY, Issue 6 2000
Mm Vandaele
Abstract Background Although the incidence of melanoma is increasing and many informative campaigns have been organized. The general population is still little informed about this tumour. Aims To organize a media campaign, with more relevant information and the opportunity for free skin inspections. Methods A ,Task Force' organized a media campaign in April 1999 and convinced 65% of the Belgian dermatologists to give up 4 h of their time to do free skin examinations for skin cancer on Monday 26 April 1999; it was called ,Melanoma Monday'. Results A total 2767 patients were screened. We found 25 melanomas and suspected 59 basal cell carcinomas. In the following 4 weeks another 141 melanomas were found. These 166 melanomas found in one month represent 15,20% of the total number of melanomas per year in Belgium. Summary A media campaign with relevant information combined with screening opportunities can lead to the early detection of melanomas in a large number of patients and can continue to alert people at risk in the following weeks. [source]


Evaluation of a teen dating violence social marketing campaign: Lessons learned when the null hypothesis was accepted

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR EVALUATION, Issue 110 2006
Emily F. Rothman
This chapter describes an evaluation of a teen dating violence prevention media campaign, including evaluation design and results, and the challenges that arose during the evaluation process. It makes recommendations for future evaluations of mass media campaigns that target adolescents. [source]


Mammography screening participation: effects of a media campaign targeting Italian-speaking women

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Issue 4 2005
Andrew Page
Objectives: To evaluate the effect of a radio and newspaper campaign encouraging Italian-speaking women aged 50,69 years to attend a population-based mammography screening program. Methods: A series of radio scripts and newspaper advertisements ran weekly in the Italian-language media over two, four-week periods. Monthly mammography screens were analysed to determine if numbers of Italian-speaking women in the program increased during the two campaign periods, using interrupted time series regression analysis. A survey of Italian-speaking women attending BreastScreen NSW during the campaign period (n=240) investigated whether individuals had heard or seen the advertisements. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the number of initial or subsequent mammograms in Italian-speaking women between the campaign periods and the period prior to (or after) the campaign. Twenty per cent of respondents cited the Italian media campaign as a prompt to attend. Fifty per cent had heard the radio ad and 30% had seen the newspaper ad encouraging Italian-speaking women to attend BSNSW. The most common prompt to attend was the BSNSW invitation letter, followed by information or recommendation from a GP. Conclusion: Radio and newspaper advertisements developed for the Italian community did not significantly increase attendance to BSNSW. Implications: Measures of program effectiveness based on self-report may not correspond to aggregate screening behaviour. The development of the media campaign in conjunction with the Italian community, and the provision of appropriate levels of resourcing, did not ensure the media campaign's success. [source]


ParentLink: A Model of Integration and Support for Parents,

FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 3 2000
Carol Mertensmeyer
ParentLink represents a collective of Missouri organizations and agencies striving to simplify parents' access to research-based information, services, and problem-solving support pertaining to parenting. It is based on systems theory (von Bertalanffy, 1981) and, more specifically, the ecology of human development (Bronfenbrenner, 1979). A comprehensive array of technologies augments ParentLink professionals' outreach to parents and other citizenry. For parents, the access can be as simple as a telephone call to ParentLink's WarmLine professionals. Other doorways for information and support include ParentLink's Web site, other Web applications, media campaigns, and forthcoming neighborhood-based Parenting Corners. Information gathered from parents and communities about parenting issues will in turn shape future programs and policies. [source]


Improving media campaigns promoting physical activity: the underutilized role of gender

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 3 2008
Dan J. Graham
As the obesity epidemic worsens in the United States and globally, resources are increasingly being allocated to address this public health threat. Media campaigns promoting physical activity are receiving funding from government and private sources, and some of these campaigns have achieved modest success. Still, more can be done to increase the effectiveness of these campaigns. Drawing on facets of consumer behavior, psychology, and public policy, this work represents a cross-disciplinary theoretical analysis suggesting that the effectiveness of media-based campaigns promoting physical activity could be enhanced by making use of gender-specific advertising. Research is reviewed suggesting that gender differences in information processing styles and values lead to gender-specific responses to media campaigns. Recommendations are made to help practitioners improve physical activity campaigns by crafting advertisements that specifically appeal to the unique preferences of each gender. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


African elephants Loxodonta africana and human-elephant interactions: implications for conservation

INTERNATIONAL ZOO YEARBOOK, Issue 1 2006
P. C. LEE
African elephants face an uncertain future. Politics, war, sustained media campaigns, corrupt, weak or absent institutions supporting conservation, land-use planning or general governance, and greed are all bringing elephants into direct conflict with humans. Although elephant populations have declined considerably relative to their historical size and range, human populations have expanded to occupy and intensively use remaining elephant areas. Strategies to minimize perceptions of conflict and the implementation of land-use planning with biodiversity protection as its goal could help to sustain at least some populations of elephants. Here, we review threats to elephants, with an emphasis on those resulting from human perceptions of conflict, and suggest some mechanisms for grappling with these threats. [source]


Evaluation of a teen dating violence social marketing campaign: Lessons learned when the null hypothesis was accepted

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR EVALUATION, Issue 110 2006
Emily F. Rothman
This chapter describes an evaluation of a teen dating violence prevention media campaign, including evaluation design and results, and the challenges that arose during the evaluation process. It makes recommendations for future evaluations of mass media campaigns that target adolescents. [source]


Interest Group Strategies: Navigating Between Privileged Access and Strategies of Pressure

POLITICAL STUDIES, Issue 4 2005
Anne Binderkrantz
The literature often contrasts interest groups possessing insider status and outsider groups forced to seek influence through more indirect means. Drawing on data from a survey of all national Danish interest groups, this article demonstrates that most groups have an action repertoire including both direct contacts to bureaucrats and parliamentarians and indirect activities such as media campaigns and mobilizations of members. Different strategies of influence are correlated positively, hence, there is no contradiction between pursuing strategies associated with insider access to decision-making and strategies where pressure is put on decision makers through media contacts and mobilizations. An analysis of four distinct strategies , an administrative, a parliamentary, a media and a mobilization strategy , finds interesting variations in the factors that affect the pursuance of the various strategies of influence. Groups with a privileged position vis-ŗ-vis decision makers have high levels of activities targeting these decision makers, but the lack of a privileged position does not lead groups to pursue indirect strategies. Indirect strategies are most intensively pursued by cause groups and groups who find themselves in a competitive situation with regard to attracting members. [source]


English language proficiency and smoking prevalence among California's Asian Americans,

CANCER, Issue S12 2005
Hao Tang M.D., Ph.D.
Abstract The authors documented California's tobacco control initiatives for Asian Americans and the current tobacco use status among Asian subgroups and provide a discussion of the challenges ahead. The California Tobacco Control Program has employed a comprehensive approach to decrease tobacco use in Asian Americans, including ethnic-specific media campaigns, culturally competent interventions, and technical assistance and training networks. Surveillance of tobacco use among Asian Americans and the interpretation of the results have always been a challenge. Data from the 2001 The California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) were analyzed to provide smoking prevalence estimates for all Asian Americans and Asian-American subgroups, including Korean, Filipino, Japanese, South Asian, Chinese, and Vietnamese. Current smoking prevalence was analyzed by gender and by English proficiency level. Cigarette smoking prevalence among Asian males in general was almost three times of that among Asian females. Korean and Vietnamese males had higher cigarette smoking prevalence rates than males in other subgroups. Although Asian females in general had low smoking prevalence rates, significant differences were found among Asian subgroups, from 1.1% (Vietnamese) to 12.7% (Japanese). Asian men who had high English proficiency were less likely to be smokers than men with lower English proficiency. Asian women with high English proficiency were more likely to be smokers than women with lower English proficiency. Smoking prevalence rates among Asian Americans in California differed significantly on the basis of ethnicity, gender, and English proficiency. English proficiency seemed to have the effect of reducing smoking prevalence rates among Asian males but had just the opposite effect among Asian females. Cancer 2005. © 2005 American Cancer Society. [source]