Mater

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Mater

  • adv. mater
  • dura mater
  • pia mater
  • rat dura mater

  • Terms modified by Mater

  • mater graft

  • Selected Abstracts


    DOPAMINERGIC RECEPTORS IN RAT DURA MATER: PHARMACOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHARMACOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, Issue 3 2004
    C Cavallotti
    SUMMARY 1.,The location and distribution of dopaminergic receptors in rat dura mater was studied by examining several dural zones (vascular, perivascular, intervascular) in different cranial and spinal regions. 2.,The pharmacological characteristics and anatomical distribution of dopamine D1- and D2-like receptors sites were investigated using combined pharmacological techniques and immunofluorescent microscopy. 3.,Samples of rat dura mater were obtained from 10 adult Wistar rats. On frozen slices, dopaminergic D1 and D2 receptors were stained immunohistochemically using monoclonal antibodies. 4.,Inhibition studies were performed using fluorescent and non-fluorescent agonists or antagonists to define the pharmacological specificity of the immunostaining. 5.,The greater sensitivity to displacement by amisulpride, bromocryptine, domperidone, haloperidol, raclopride and l -sulpiride than to displacement by N -propyl-nor-apomorphine, quinpirole and clozapine suggests that the immunofluorescent sites observed in these experiments are likely to belong to the dopamine D2 receptor subtype. 6.,Our observations provide evidence of the presence of D1 and D2 receptors in the wall of meningeal vessels. The dopaminergic receptors are located in the adventitia, media and intima of dural arteries. Furthermore, the density of receptors is higher in close proximity to arteries and decreases passing from the vascular to the perivascular and intervascular zones. 7.,In the rat dura mater, dopamine regulates the meningeal blood vessels and, through this action, dopamine and its receptors can play an important role in the pathogenesis of cephalalgia. [source]


    Enhanced Strength and Ductility in Ultrafine-Grained Aluminium Produced by Accumulative Roll Bonding,

    ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATERIALS, Issue 9 2004
    H.W. Höppel
    Due to a printing error in the Adv. Eng. Mater. 2004, 6, issue 4, this article, originally published on pages 219,222, had to be reprinted. Now the correct references are given to allow all readers the correct access to the literature. The editorial team apologizes for any inconveniences this may have caused. [source]


    Conjugated Polymer Based on Polycyclic Aromatics for Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells: A Case Study of Quadrathienonaphthalene Polymers with 2% Efficiency

    ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS, Issue 4 2010
    Shengqiang Xiao
    Abstract Polycyclic aromatics offer great flexibility in tuning the energy levels and bandgaps of resulting conjugated polymers. These features have been exploited in the recent examples of benzo[2,1- b:3,4- b']dithiophene (BDT)-based polymers for bulk heterojunction (BHJ) photovoltaics (ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces2009, 1, 1613). Taking one step further, a simple oxidative photocyclization is used here to convert the BDT with two pendent thiophene units into an enlarged planar polycyclic aromatic ring,quadrathienonaphthalene (QTN). The reduced steric hindrance and more planar structure promotes the intermolecular interaction of QTN- based polymers, leading to increased hole mobility in related polymers. As-synthesized homopolymer (HMPQTN) and donor,acceptor polymer (PQTN - BT) maintain a low highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level, ascribable to the polycyclic aromatic (QTN) moiety, which leads to a good open-circuit voltage in BHJ devices of these polymers blended with PCBM ([6,6]-phenyl-C61 -butyric acid methyl ester; HMPQTN: 0.76,V, PQTN - BT: 0.72,V). The donor,acceptor polymer (PQTN - BT) has a smaller optical bandgap (1.6,eV) than that of HMPQTN (2.0,eV), which explains its current (5.69,mA,cm,2) being slightly higher than that of HMPQTN (5.02,mA,cm,2). Overall efficiencies over 2% are achieved for BHJ devices fabricated from either polymer with PCBM as the acceptor. [source]


    Optical Power Limiters: Symmetric Versus Unsymmetric Platinum(II) Bis(aryleneethynylene)s with Distinct Electronic Structures for Optical Power Limiting/Optical Transparency Trade-off Optimization (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS, Issue 4 2009
    8/2009)
    The development of symmetric and unsymmetric platinum(II) bis(acetylide)s as highly transparent optical limiters is described by Wong and co-workers on page 531. Their excited state character is governed by electronic structure, which significantly affects their photophysical properties and optical power limiting (OPL) behavior. The sound OPL responses and low OPL thresholds together with their excellent optical transparency render these materials very promising candidates for practical devices for the protection of human eyes and other delicate electro-optic sensors. [source]


    Chitosan/Gold Nanocomposites: Chitosan Films Doped with Gold Nanorods as Laser-Activatable Hybrid Bioadhesives (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 38 2010
    38/2010)
    The cover image represents an inside view of a laser-activated gold nanorod/chitosan film. Gold nanorods dispersed throughout the polymeric chitosan matrix absorb incident near-infrared laser light. The photothermal conversion from the gold nanorods activates the surrounding chitosan strands to mediate functional adhesion with biological tissue, as discussed in work reported on p. 4313 by Paolo Matteini and co-workers. [source]


    Flexible Electronics: Fully Flexible Solution-Deposited ZnO Thin-Film Transistors (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 38 2010
    38/2010)
    Solution-processed ,real' flexible ZnO thin-film transistors (TFTs) on plastic substrates are demonstrated on p. 4308 by Jooho Moon and co-workers. The flexible device shows exceptional and unprecedented stability against various stresses such as bending, rolling, wearing, and folding, exhibiting no degradation at tensile strains up to 6.35%. Such solution processable semiconductor devices can be used to realize transparent, flexible electronic devices. [source]


    Colloidal Networks: Polymorphic Meniscus Convergence for Construction of Quasi-Periodic Assemblies and Networks of Colloidal Nanoparticles (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 37 2010
    37/2010)
    Quasi-periodic colloidal networks can be constructed on the basis of polymorphic meniscus convergence (MC) in an air-cavity-embedded, nanocolloidal system, report Sin-Doo Lee and coworkers on p. 4172. Depending on the flow associated with the air-cavities, the colloidal particles are self-organized into nanowires through binary MC, hexagonal networks with Y-junctions through ternary MC and square networks with X-junctions through quaternary MC, reflecting the flow symmetry according to the air-cavity deformation. [source]


    Cellular Imaging: Conjugated Oligoelectrolyte Harnessed Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane as Light-Up Hybrid Nanodot for Two-Photon Fluorescence Imaging of Cellular Nucleus (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 37 2010
    37/2010)
    Bin Liu and co-workers report on p. 4186 on a water-soluble organic/inorganic hybrid nanodot based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) and conjugated oligoelectrolytes for twophoton fluorescence imaging of cellular nuclei. The small size of the dots (,3.3 nm) impart nucleus permeability and substantial DNA-enhanced twophoton excited fluorescence that allows highcontrast illumination of the nucleus. [source]


    Strong Efficiency Improvements in Ultra-low-Cost Inorganic Nanowire Solar Cells (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 35 2010
    35/2010)
    [source]


    Complex Oxide Interfaces: Determination of Electronic Structure of Oxide,Oxide Interfaces by Photoemission Spectroscopy (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 26-27 2010
    27/2010)
    Precise understanding of structure , property relationships at interfaces is critical for electronic devices, particularly at the nanometer scale, and can be achieved by a synergy of high-quality growth, advanced characterization, and first principles theory (on page 2950). [source]


    Photosensitive Nanocomposites: Highly Non-Linear Quantum Dot Doped Nanocomposites for Functional Three-Dimensional Structures Generated by Two-Photon Polymerization (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 22 2010
    22/2010)
    Baohua Jia, Min Gu, and co-workers report on p.,2463 on novel quantum dot functionalized photosensitive nanocomposites showing ultrahigh third-order nonlinearity. The cover image shows functional three-dimensional micronano photonic structures, for example, photonic crystals can be fabricated in such active nanocomposites using the versatile two-photon poly-merisation method, opening various possibilities in active micro/nano devices, such as ultrafast switching, signal regeneration, and high speed demultiplexing systems. [source]


    Superhydrophobic Coatings: The Salvinia Paradox: Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Hydrophilic Pins for Air Retention Under Water (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 21 2010
    21/2010)
    The cover shows the sophisticated surface design of the floating water fern Salvinia. The unique surface architecture is composed of complex hydrophobic eggbeater-shaped hairs with hydrophilic terminal cells. The evenly distributed hydrophilic patches stabilize the air layer by pinning the air/water interface in place. The paradox combination of hydrophilic patches on superhydrophobic surfaces (the "Salvinia Effect") provides an innovative concept for smart biomimetic surfaces in maritime coatings and underwater applications, as reported by Wilhelm Barthlott, Thomas Schimmel, and co-workers on p. 2325. [source]


    Nanofabrication: Curving Nanostructures Using Extrinsic Stress (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 21 2010
    21/2010)
    A simple way to fabricate simultaneously patterned and curved nanostructures with radii as small as 20 nm is demonstrated on p. 2320 by David Gracias and co-workers. Curved nanostructures with both homogeneous (nanorings, nanotubes) and variable (nanospirals) radii of curvature spontaneously assembled when grain coalescence was induced in electron-beam-patterned thin-film bilayers. In addition, large stresses could be induced after deposition and patterning and only when required, thereby suggesting an extrinsic stress-based strategy to trigger assembly on demand. [source]


    Printed Origami Structures (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 20 2010
    20/2010)
    Bok Y. Ahn, Jennifer Lewis, and co-workers report on p.,2251 a new method for creating complex 3D structures that combines direct-write assembly with a wet-folding origami technique. Planar lattices composed of a titanium hydride ink are printed, and then folded, rolled, or molded into the desired shape. These 3D objects are then transformed into metallic or ceramic structures by thermal annealing. [source]


    Nanowires: A Microfluidic Approach for the Formation of Conductive Nanowires and Hollow Hybrid Structures (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 20 2010
    20/2010)
    The inside cover shows a scanning electron microscopy image of electrically conductive hybrid nanofibers made of tetrathiafulvalene/gold produced by hydrodynamic flow focusing in a microfluidic device, as reported in work by Josep Puigmartí-Luis and co-workers on p.,2255. The hybrid nanowires produced using this method are potential candidates for nanoscale sensor applications due to their electrical conductivity and their ease of functionalization. [source]


    Lithium-Ion Batteries: Nanostructured Fe3O4/SWNT Electrode: Binder-Free and High-Rate Li-Ion Anode (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 20 2010
    20/2010)
    A flexible carbon nanotube net is employed to demonstrate high capacity/high volume expansion materials for Li-ion battery electrodes, as presented by A. C. Dillon et al. on page E145. An electrode, with well over twice the capacity of the state-of-the-art technology, charges and discharges in 12 minutes without significant capacity fade. These advancements, funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies Program, will help enable next generation electric vehicles. [source]


    Photovoltaic Devices: High-Efficiency Solar Cell with Earth-Abundant Liquid-Processed Absorber (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 20 2010
    20/2010)
    The image shows a thin-film solar cell, deposited from a hybrid solution-nanoparticle ink, with a background scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image of the zinc-compound particle component of the ink. A cross-sectional SEM image of the device shows the large-grained kesterite absorber layer composed of readily available elements: Cu-Zn-Sn-S-Se. The solution-processed devices offer record power conversion efficiency for kesterite absorber layers, as presented by D. B. Mitzi et al. on page E156. [source]


    Materials Synthesis and Assembly (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 10 2010
    10/2010)
    [source]


    Organic Electronics: Improved Performance of Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Through the Reduction of Phase Separation via Solvent Additives (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 8 2010
    8/2010)
    The fabrication of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells from solution-casting techniques using low-cost materials makes them a promising new technology for converting sunlight into electricity. T.-Q. Nguyen, G. C. Bazan, et al. report on p. E63 that undesirable large-scale aggregation and phase separation that may arise during deposition can be reduced by incorporating a small amount of a well-chosen solvent additive. [source]


    Dynamic Hydrogels: Switching of 3D Microenvironments Using Two-Component Naturally Derived Extracellular Matrices (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 6 2010
    6/2010)
    The front cover image depicts a two-component extracellular matrix (ECM) in which one component acts as a stable structural element (which supports cell attachment and migration) and another component gels or dissolves reversibly (a modulatory component). Samuel K. Sia and co-workers show on p. 686 that by dynamically adding or removing crosslinks in the modulatory component, properties of the composite ECM, such as the ability of cells to migrate and the rate of diffusive transport, can be altered. [source]


    Inkjet Printing: Inkjet Printing,Process and Its Applications (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 6 2010
    6/2010)
    Ghassan E. Jabbour and co-workers highlight recent developments in inkjet printing technology and applications on p. 673. The inside cover image shows starting materials (upper left), the inkjet printing process (center), and two examples of applications: QVGA quantum-dot LEDs (bottom left) and macromolecular OLEDs (bottom right). [source]


    Self-Assembled Nanostructures: Role of Water in Directing Diphenylalanine Assembly into Nanotubes and Nanowires (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 5 2010
    5/2010)
    The controllable assembly behavior of diphenylalanine molecules to form nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) and their structural details are presented. Hyotcherl Ihee, Sang Ouk Kim and co-workers show on p. 583 that the nanoscale morphologies are closely related to molecular arrangements of diphenylalanine as revealed by Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray diffraction patterns and electron-density distributions in NTs and NWs via the maximum entropy method analysis. [source]


    Inorganic Materials and Ionic Liquids: Large-scale Nanopatterning of Single Proteins used as Carriers of Magnetic Nanoparticles (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 5 2010
    5/2010)
    Ricardo Garcia, Eugenio Coronado, and co-workers demonstrate on p. 588 large-scale patterning of single ferritin molecules by sequential (atomic force microscopy local oxidation) and parallel approaches (lithographically controlled wetting). The nanopattern size matches the size of the protein (,10 nm). Electrostatic interactions, capillary forces, surface functionalization, and nanolithography are used to achieve the desired protein organization. [source]


    Organic Electronics: High-mobility Ambipolar Transistors and High-gain Inverters from a Donor,Acceptor Copolymer Semiconductor (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 4 2010
    4/2010)
    The cover illustrates a polymer semiconductor highway for efficient transport of both electrons and holes. On p. 478, Samson A. Jenekhe, Mark D. Watson, and co-workers have demonstrated high-mobility single-component ambipolar field-effect transistors, by utilizing a new polymer semiconductor, and integrated them into complementary inverters. Polymer semiconductors with good ambipolar charge transport provide a simpler way to realize complementary circuits and other devices and functions in organic electronics. [source]


    Drug Delivery: Drawing Lithography: Three-Dimensional Fabrication of an Ultrahigh-Aspect-Ratio Microneedle (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 4 2010
    4/2010)
    Ultrahigh-aspect-ratio microneedles can be fabricated via "drawing lithography", a novel technique in which a thermosetting polymer is directly drawn from a two-dimensional solid surface without the need for a mask and light irradiation. Kwang Lee and co-workers demonstrate this technique on p. 483. The inside cover shows a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image of three-dimensional structures with ultrahigh aspect ratios, potentially suitable as drug-delivery devices that could replace hypodermic syringes. [source]


    Biocompatible Polymers: Structurally Controlled Bio-hybrid Materials Based on Unidirectional Association of Anisotropic Microparticles with Human Endothelial Cells (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 48 2009
    48/2009)
    Biocompatible anisotropic polymer particles with bipolar affinity towards human endothelial cells are a novel type of building blocks for microstructured biohybrid materials, report Joerg Lahann and co-workers on p. 4920. Functional polarity due to two biologically distinct hemispheres has been achieved by synthesis of anisotropic particles via electro-hydrodynamic co-jetting of two different polymer solutions and subsequent selective surface modification. [source]


    Multifunctional Integrated Platforms: Fabrication of Advanced Functional Devices Combining Soft Chemistry with X-ray Lithography in One Step (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 48 2009
    48/2009)
    Combining bottom-up sol,gel assembly with micro- and nanofabrication offers a simple and fast route to develop multifunctional integrated platforms, from microfluidics to microarrays, allowing the chemistry and geometry to be tailored to the application, as reported by Paolo Falcaro, Plinio Innocenzi, and co-workers on p. 4932. The inside cover illustrates different patterns of functionalized surfaces. The background is an example of highly controlled microfluidic interface fabricated combining deep X-rays lithography with sol,gel syntheses. [source]


    Electrocatalysts: Facile Construction of Pt,Co/CNx Nanotube Electrocatalysts and Their Application to the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 48 2009
    48/2009)
    Pt,Co alloyed nanoparticles can be facilely immobilized onto CNx nanotubes due to the incorporated nitrogen, report Yanwen Ma, Zheng Hu, and co-workers on p. 4953. The as-prepared electrocatalysts exhibit good performance for oxygen reduction reactions in acidic media arising from the high dispersion and alloying effect of Pt,Co nanoparticles, as well as the intrinsic catalytic capacity of CNx nanotubes, which is significant for the development of fuel cells. [source]


    Microfluidics: Surface-Treatment-Induced Three-Dimensional Capillary Morphogenesis in a Microfluidic Platform (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 47 2009
    47/2009)
    The cover shows confocal images of 3D sprouting into matrix material in microfluidic channels. Roger Kamm and co-workers report on p. 4863 that robust induction of realistic angiogenesis into the 3D matrix material under simultaneous imaging and a stably controlled concentration gradient of chemoattractants can be achieved. The formation of a 3D vascular network is demonstrated to be a direct consequence of surface treatment of the region of the device-containing matrix material. [source]


    Organic Nanowires: Connecting Organic Nanowires (Adv. Mater.

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 47 2009
    47/2009)
    Single-crystal organic nanowires are destined to become essential components in near-future organic electronics, however, currently one of the main drawbacks preventing implementation is the difficulty of creating stable interconnections between the nanowires. On p. 4816, Ana Borras and co-workers present a universal and effective method of creating nanowire,nanowire and nanowire,metallic Ohmic connections. The inside cover image shows the connection of single-crystal metallo-phthalocyanine nanowires via silver nanoparticles. [source]