Masticatory Cycle (masticatory + cycle)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Measurement of jerk-cost using a triaxial piezoelectric accelerometer for the evaluation of jaw movement smoothness

JOURNAL OF ORAL REHABILITATION, Issue 8 2010
I. MINAMI
Summary, Jerk-cost as a measure of jaw movement smoothness has been used to evaluate the masticatory function of patients with tooth loss and malocclusion. Jerk-cost measuring systems have thus far been unable to determine the jerk-cost of each chewing phase over time. The purposes of this study were (i) to develop a new method for measuring momentary jerk-cost of the jaw movement using a small triaxial piezoelectric accelerometer and (ii) to test the hypothesis that the lowest smoothness is seen during jaw-opening phase. The accelerometer was attached to the skin of the mentum of each subject. Vertical jaw displacement, acceleration, the jerk, and the time differential of jerk-cost during gum chewing were analysed as a function of time in five normal dentate subjects (n = 5). The system revealed intra-class correlation coefficients of intra-examiner, inter-examiner, and test,retest consistency of substantially high values (080,088). In all subjects, the highest jerk-cost was observed in the opening phase of each chewing cycle when the gum was parting from the teeth; the lowest jerk-cost was observed in the intercuspal phase throughout the chewing cycle, thus confirming the hypothesis. Significant differences were observed between the opening, closing, and intercuspal chewing phases (N = 5, P = 0007). The smoothness measurement system used in this study evaluated the momentary smoothness of each chewing phase in the masticatory cycle. The system may serve as a diagnostic tool to evaluate the smoothness of the jaw movement in general dental practice. [source]


Distance of the contact glide in the closing masticatory stroke during mastication of three types of food

JOURNAL OF ORAL REHABILITATION, Issue 8 2009
B. RILO
Summary, This study was designed to characterize the distance of the contact glide in the closing masticatory stroke in healthy adult subjects, during chewing of three types of food (crustless bread, chewing gum and peanuts). Mandibular movements (masticatory movements and laterality movements with dental contact) were registered using a gnathograph (MK-6I Diagnostic System) on the right and left side during unilateral chewing of the three food types. Length of dental contact was measured in masticatory cycle, which is defined as where the terminal part of the chewing cycles could be superimposed on the pathways taken by the mandible during lateral excursions with occlusal contacts. The length of dental contact during mastication of chewing gum is 146 1 mm, during chewing of soft bread is 138 07 mm and during chewing of peanuts is 145 09 mm. There is no significant difference in the lengths of dental contact during mastication of three types of foods that enable direct tooth gliding. [source]


Buccal and lingual activity during mastication and swallowing in typical adults

JOURNAL OF ORAL REHABILITATION, Issue 1 2003
M. J. Casas
summary, A non-invasive protocol was developed to assess tongue and cheek movements during mastication and to evaluate the temporal relationship between mastication and the initiation of pharyngeal swallowing. Typical adults (three males and three females) were monitored during chewing. Miniature pressure transducers were bonded unilaterally to the buccal and lingual surfaces of the first mandibular molar and the buccal surface of the first maxillary molar on each subject's preferred chewing side. Surface electromyography of the ipsilateral masseter muscle was recorded as an indicator of jaw-closing activity. Pressure and electromyography (EMG) recordings were time-linked to simultaneous B-mode ultrasound imaging of the oral cavity using a submental, coronal view aligned with the first mandibular molar. The intervals between peak pressure recorded at each pressure transducer and peak jaw-closing activity for each masticatory cycle were not statistically different [analysis of variance (anova), P=09856] and displayed large statistical variation. These intervals were not different at the beginning of the trials (hard biscuit) than they were at the completion of mastication when the cookie had been broken down to a paste/puree consistency bolus. The interval between the last chewing stroke and the initiation of swallowing was 092 034 s). No significant difference existed among subjects for this time interval (anova, P=0382). [source]


Analysis of Masticatory Cycle Efficiency in Complete Denture Wearers

JOURNAL OF PROSTHODONTICS, Issue 1 2010
Marcelo Coelho Goiato DDS
Abstract Purpose: This study assessed masticatory efficiency and duration of the masticatory cycle in 14 asymptomatic patients with severe bone resorption. All patients had worn complete dentures for over 10 years. Recall visits were scheduled at 5 months and 1 year after receiving new dentures. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients were evaluated in this study. The Research Diagnostic Criteria questionnaire and tests of the efficiency and duration of the masticatory cycle were performed with artificial food before, 5 months after, and 1 year after new dentures were delivered. Masticatory efficiency was assessed using a sieve system; artificial food was ground for 35 masticatory cycles and monitored by the operator. Results: Masticatory efficiency at 5 months was significantly improved for the 0.42-mm mesh. An improvement in masticatory efficiency and a reduction in mastication time were observed with the new dentures after 1 year. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that 5 months did not allow enough time to demonstrate improved muscular capacity and ability after receiving new dentures. After 1 year, the duration of the masticatory cycle was reduced, and masticatory efficiency was significantly improved. [source]


Validation of video versus electromyography for chewing evaluation of the elderly wearing a complete denture

JOURNAL OF ORAL REHABILITATION, Issue 8 2007
E. NICOLAS
summary, Chewing efficiency may affect nutritional status in the elderly. Many elderly patients are complete denture wearers, and often present cognitive problems. Those two factors make evaluation of mastication difficult with experimental methods. Analysis of video recording may be a simple way to routinely assess chewing parameters. This study aimed at validating several parameters of video evaluation versus electromyography (EMG), which is considered the ,gold standard'. The design was a prospective randomized study, carried out at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Twelve complete denture wearers chewed four model foods differing in hardness. Sessions were videotaped and EMG recordings were registered. Mastication time, number of masticatory cycles and cleaning time were recorded simultaneously by video and EMG. Two investigators independently analyzed the videos twice, in random order. Evaluation of criterion validity: a positive video/EMG correlation was found for the parameters ,chewing time' (089, Pearson) and ,number of masticatory cycles' (094, Spearman), whereas no statistical difference was found between these two EMG and video variables (t -test). Inter and intra-rater reliability gave a positive intraclass coefficient (ICC) for duration of mastication (086,098), number of masticatory cycles (090,097) and cleaning time (090,098). Discriminatory ability was studied using anova (P = 001): variation was significant in masticatory duration (F = 10), number of masticatory cycles (F = 10) and cleaning time (F = 4). Video may be a useful assessment tool in prosthetic rehabilitation and can be applied to help choose the type of food (solid, semi-liquid or liquid) to administer to dependent persons, particularly those suffering from dementia. [source]


Analysis of Masticatory Cycle Efficiency in Complete Denture Wearers

JOURNAL OF PROSTHODONTICS, Issue 1 2010
Marcelo Coelho Goiato DDS
Abstract Purpose: This study assessed masticatory efficiency and duration of the masticatory cycle in 14 asymptomatic patients with severe bone resorption. All patients had worn complete dentures for over 10 years. Recall visits were scheduled at 5 months and 1 year after receiving new dentures. Materials and Methods: Fourteen patients were evaluated in this study. The Research Diagnostic Criteria questionnaire and tests of the efficiency and duration of the masticatory cycle were performed with artificial food before, 5 months after, and 1 year after new dentures were delivered. Masticatory efficiency was assessed using a sieve system; artificial food was ground for 35 masticatory cycles and monitored by the operator. Results: Masticatory efficiency at 5 months was significantly improved for the 0.42-mm mesh. An improvement in masticatory efficiency and a reduction in mastication time were observed with the new dentures after 1 year. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that 5 months did not allow enough time to demonstrate improved muscular capacity and ability after receiving new dentures. After 1 year, the duration of the masticatory cycle was reduced, and masticatory efficiency was significantly improved. [source]


Validation of video versus electromyography for chewing evaluation of the elderly wearing a complete denture

JOURNAL OF ORAL REHABILITATION, Issue 8 2007
E. NICOLAS
summary, Chewing efficiency may affect nutritional status in the elderly. Many elderly patients are complete denture wearers, and often present cognitive problems. Those two factors make evaluation of mastication difficult with experimental methods. Analysis of video recording may be a simple way to routinely assess chewing parameters. This study aimed at validating several parameters of video evaluation versus electromyography (EMG), which is considered the ,gold standard'. The design was a prospective randomized study, carried out at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Twelve complete denture wearers chewed four model foods differing in hardness. Sessions were videotaped and EMG recordings were registered. Mastication time, number of masticatory cycles and cleaning time were recorded simultaneously by video and EMG. Two investigators independently analyzed the videos twice, in random order. Evaluation of criterion validity: a positive video/EMG correlation was found for the parameters ,chewing time' (089, Pearson) and ,number of masticatory cycles' (094, Spearman), whereas no statistical difference was found between these two EMG and video variables (t -test). Inter and intra-rater reliability gave a positive intraclass coefficient (ICC) for duration of mastication (086,098), number of masticatory cycles (090,097) and cleaning time (090,098). Discriminatory ability was studied using anova (P = 001): variation was significant in masticatory duration (F = 10), number of masticatory cycles (F = 10) and cleaning time (F = 4). Video may be a useful assessment tool in prosthetic rehabilitation and can be applied to help choose the type of food (solid, semi-liquid or liquid) to administer to dependent persons, particularly those suffering from dementia. [source]