Marketing Campaigns (marketing + campaign)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


THE CO-PRODUCTION OF NARRATIVE IN AN ENTREPRENEURIAL CITY: AN ANALYSIS OF CINCINNATI, OHIO, IN TURMOIL

GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 2 2009
Jamie Gillen
ABSTRACT. In April 2001 Cincinnati, Ohio, erupted into violence and protracted unrest after the police shooting of an unarmed African-American named Timothy Thomas. African-American interest groups in the city subsequently organized an economic boycott of downtown businesses. In response to the demonstration and the boycott, the Cincinnati government issued a marketing campaign entitled ,We're On the Move!', intending to give nod to past failures and launch forward movement on their part. In this article I investigate the entirety of these events as narrative moments under the auspices of urban entrepreneurialism to answer the question: How does the local population inform, rather than simply mediate, the narrative administration of an urban entrepreneurial form of governance? I then turn to a response to the campaign by an African-American newspaper columnist in Cincinnati to underscore a dialogic relationship between an entrepreneurial city and its citizens as it forms the presentation of entrepreneurialism. In turn, this conception allows for a more nuanced version of entrepreneurial governance more generally. [source]


Evaluation of a teen dating violence social marketing campaign: Lessons learned when the null hypothesis was accepted

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR EVALUATION, Issue 110 2006
Emily F. Rothman
This chapter describes an evaluation of a teen dating violence prevention media campaign, including evaluation design and results, and the challenges that arose during the evaluation process. It makes recommendations for future evaluations of mass media campaigns that target adolescents. [source]


Organic purchasing motivations and attitudes: are they ethical?

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CONSUMER STUDIES, Issue 2 2002
M.G. McEachern
Abstract Despite the increased documentation of consumers' purchases of organic food products, the motivations for such purchases are relatively under-researched. An individual's choice of food products can be linked clearly to ethical stances, but ethical choices can also vary from individual to individual, from industry to industry and among countries. Consequently, this paper investigates the degree to which ethical beliefs influence Scottish consumer perceptions, beliefs, attitudes and purchasing decisions, with regard to organic dairy products. Consumer purchasing motivations are revealed as being self-interest-centred (i.e. better tasting, safer), rather than altruistic. Therefore, to achieve future market development, organic dairy producers cannot rely upon the minority of hardcore green consumers to sustain growth, but must aim to modify perceptions and attitudes of larger consumer segments by implementing educational marketing campaigns that reinforce the ethical, environmental and societal benefits of organic production. [source]


Motivations and forms of corporate giving behaviour: insights from Australia

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 4 2008
Gary Noble
Although corporate support for many nonprofit organisations (NPOs) represents only a relatively small component of their overall income its importance is growing. As a consequence, the need to understand corporate giving behaviour in a way that supports the development of strategically targeted and successful marketing campaigns is of growing importance to marketing managers in many NPOs around the globe. This paper presents the findings of a study into the ,why' and ,how' of corporate giving behaviour in Australia. In the seven case studies examined, there was no strong evidence that Australian corporations give for other than strategic profit maximisation or political reasons. In contrast to the literature, altruistic and managerial utility did not emerge as strong motivational factors. This study also found that corporations are likely to have a number of corporate giving programmes each with its own underlying motivation and strategic purpose which network together to form a hierarchy of corporate giving programmes. The paper concludes by discussing the implications of this research for NPO managers attempting to increase their level of corporate support. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Using fear appeals to promote cancer screening,are we scaring the wrong people?

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 2 2006
Sandra C. Jones
There is debate regarding the use of fear appeals (emphasizing severe threats to health) in social marketing, to encourage preventive behaviours, such as screening for breast cancer. While it has been found that fear appeals may result in attitude and behaviour change there is also the risk of inciting inappropriate levels of fear, motivating the wrong audience or instigating maladaptive behaviour in the target group such as denial or defensive avoidance. This study examined the impact of an experimental threat manipulation for mammography screening on a group of women in regional Australia. The study found that varying the level of threat had no impact on stated intentions of the women to undergo mammographic screening. However, it also found that high-threat messages resulted in stronger negative emotional reactions and greater perceived susceptibility among younger women who are not the target group for screening in Australia. The results of this study emphasize the importance of limiting the use of high levels of threat in social marketing campaigns, and ensuring that campaigns are appropriately designed to specifically impact upon and motivate the target group. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Changing Trends in Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in the Population Aged 50 and Older

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 9 2007
Sindy M. Paul MD
OBJECTIVES: To alert persons in the public and private healthcare professions to the increasing trends in higher proportions of persons aged 50 and older who are newly diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and who are living with HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). DESIGN: Data from the period 1992 through 2004 from the HIV/AIDS Reporting System (HARS) were analyzed. SETTING: New Jersey is the eleventh-most-populous state, with the highest density of persons per square mile. It also has the fifth-highest number of AIDS cases. PARTICIPANTS: All persons residing in New Jersey and reported to HARS with HIV infection or who are considered to have AIDS. MEASUREMENTS: Trends in persons aged 50 and older were compared with those in the population younger than 50 during 1992 through 2004 for the numbers of persons living with HIV/AIDS and the number of persons newly diagnosed with HIV infection. RESULTS: The proportion of all persons aged 50 and older living with HIV/AIDS in 2004 was significantly greater than the comparable proportion of persons in 1992. Proportionally, more persons were newly diagnosed with HIV who were aged 50 and older according to sex and for each of the three major race or ethnicity groups (white non-Hispanic, black non-Hispanic, and Hispanic) than were persons younger than 50. Each of these increases was statistically significant. CONCLUSION: HIV/AIDS social marketing campaigns should include images and issues related to older persons in educational and prevention efforts. New methods that reach older populations should be considered. Physicians and other healthcare providers should be made aware of their role in prevention and education about HIV. Testing of older populations with risk factors should be encouraged. [source]


Values of protagonists in best pictures and blockbusters: Implications for marketing

PSYCHOLOGY & MARKETING, Issue 5 2009
Douglas Charles Beckwith
Understanding the personal values of protagonists in films can provide a foundation upon which to build film marketing campaigns. The research discussed below focused on the personal values of protagonists in 93 films comprising three samples released in the United States between 1996 and 2005 noteworthy for their eminent creativity and/or high profitability. The method used was content analysis with coding based on the adaptations of the Rokeach value descriptors. The most important personal values related to goals were determined to be family security, self-respect, a sense of accomplishment, and true friendship (in all three samples); mature love and wisdom (in two samples); and inner harmony and national security (in one sample each). The most important personal values related to desirable behaviors were being ambitious, capable, courageous, helpful, loving, and responsible (in all three samples); and being honest (in one sample). Longitudinal analyses of the value hierarchies that changed in significance from beginning to end of the films indicated a shift from selfconcern and materialism to societal concerns and altruism. The content analysis methodology used in this study has implications for marketing professionals in that it reveals means of analyzing popular films as source material to garner insights into the personal values of the consumers who attend the films. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]