Managers

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Business, Economics, Finance and Accounting

Kinds of Managers

  • asset managers
  • bank managers
  • business managers
  • care managers
  • case managers
  • chain managers
  • company managers
  • conservation managers
  • corporate managers
  • development managers
  • emergency managers
  • environmental managers
  • female managers
  • firm managers
  • fisheries managers
  • forest managers
  • fund managers
  • future managers
  • general managers
  • health care managers
  • health managers
  • health service managers
  • healthcare managers
  • hospital managers
  • hr managers
  • investment managers
  • land managers
  • line managers
  • many managers
  • marketing managers
  • middle managers
  • nonprofit managers
  • nurse managers
  • nursing managers
  • occupational therapy managers
  • other managers
  • plant managers
  • portfolio managers
  • product development managers
  • product managers
  • program managers
  • project managers
  • public managers
  • purchasing managers
  • r&d managers
  • resource managers
  • risk managers
  • sector managers
  • senior managers
  • service managers
  • supply chain managers
  • top managers
  • unit managers
  • ward managers
  • water managers
  • water resource managers
  • wildlife managers
  • woman managers

  • Terms modified by Managers

  • managers decision
  • managers need
  • managers perception
  • managers use
  • managers views

  • Selected Abstracts


    LABOR LAW FOR MANAGERS OF NON-UNION EMPLOYEES IN TRADITIONAL AND CYBER WORKPLACES

    AMERICAN BUSINESS LAW JOURNAL, Issue 4 2003
    Nancy J. King
    First page of article [source]


    EMOTION HELPERS: THE ROLE OF HIGH POSITIVE AFFECTIVITY AND HIGH SELF-MONITORING MANAGERS

    PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 2 2007
    GINKA TOEGEL
    Who provides help to employees suffering anxiety and emotional pain in organizations? From an interactionist perspective, we anticipated that increasing levels of managerial responsibility would unlock discretionary helping behavior related to differences in self-monitoring and positive affectivity. Results from a study of 94 members of a recruitment firm confirmed that those active in providing emotional help to others in the workplace tended to possess a combination of managerial responsibility and a high self-monitoring or high positive affectivity disposition. By contrast, when members were low in positive affect or self-monitoring they provided less emotional help to others, irrespective of the level of managerial responsibility. These interaction results remained significant after taking into account centrality in friendship and workflow networks, as well as significant effects of gender. [source]


    MEN, WOMEN, AND MANAGERS: ARE STEREOTYPES FINALLY CHANGING?

    PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 4 2006
    EMILY E. DUEHR
    As the number of women in management roles increases and organizations place a greater emphasis on diversity, a subsequent change in perceptions of women as leader-like is expected. To test this notion, we examined gender and management stereotypes of male and female managers and students. Results reveal considerable change in male managers' views of women over the past 30 years, as evidenced by greater congruence between their perceptions of women and successful managers and stronger endorsement of agentic and task-oriented leadership characteristics for women. Stereotypes held by male students changed less, remaining strikingly similar to stereotypes held by male managers 15 years ago. Across samples, there was general agreement in the characteristics of managers but less agreement about the characteristics of women. We also found men somewhat less likely than women to attribute successful manager characteristics to women. Respondents with positive past experiences with female managers tended to rate women higher on management characteristics. [source]


    PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR MANAGERS OVER 20 YEARS: A TEST OF THE ,CONVERGENCE THESIS'

    PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, Issue 4 2006
    MICHAEL POOLE
    This paper sets out to test the ,convergence thesis' in respect of managers in the public and private sectors in Britain. New Public Management (NPM) initiatives have had the objective of making managerial behaviour in public sector organizations more similar to that in the private sector. Based on unique national surveys undertaken in 1980, 1990 and 2000, using quite large random samples of fellows and members of the Chartered Management Institute (CMI), comparisons are made to investigate whether ,convergence' between public and private sector managers has actually occurred. The patterns are found to be complex and, although there are some signs of convergence, the two sectors continue to exhibit similarities, persistent differences and parallel movements evident in managerial attitudes, behaviour and experiences. [source]


    EFFICIENT MIXED CLUBS: NONLINEAR-PRICING EQUILIBRIA WITH ENTREPRENEURIAL MANAGERS

    THE JAPANESE ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 1 2010
    HIDEO KONISHI
    Scotchmer and Wooders show that efficient clubs are homogeneous when consumers are divisible in Berglas's anonymous crowding model. However, if consumers are not divisible or if clubs have multiple facilities with economies of scope, mixed clubs are efficient. In such a model, we consider clubs with multiple membership policies for different types of consumers, and show the existence and efficiency of equilibrium with nonlinear policies. We employ entrepreneurial equilibrium, all equilibrium concept with profit-seeking entrepreneurs. Our theorem can be regarded as showing the existence of a core allocation that satisfies envy-free property in the absence of non-anonymous crowding effects. [source]


    HOW DO MANAGERS BEHAVE IN STOCK OPTION PLANS?

    THE JOURNAL OF FINANCIAL RESEARCH, Issue 2 2009
    CLINICAL EVIDENCE FROM EXERCISE AND SURVEY DATA
    Abstract We use unique case study data to analyze the behavior of top managers in an executive stock option plan. We gather questionnaire data on the managers' traits and combine it with exercise data. Managers in our sample expect low volatilities (compared to historical estimates) and are well diversified and modestly risk averse. This implies that the value,cost wedge of options can be smaller than usually assumed. The exercise decisions vary with expected volatility, managerial wealth, and mental accounting. Managers expecting lower volatility exercise earlier. This result is consistent with the predictions of expected utility models using our managers' survey parameters. [source]


    EVIDENCE ON THE COMPENSATION OF PORTFOLIO MANAGERS

    THE JOURNAL OF FINANCIAL RESEARCH, Issue 3 2006
    Heber Farnsworth
    Abstract We surveyed 396 portfolio managers about the structure of their compensation. Overall, more compensation packages are subjective/discretionary than objective/formula based. Firm success factors such as firm profitability have more effect on bonuses than do client success factors such as investment performance. Differences in the structure of compensation across firms, clients, job types, and manager characteristics reflect likely differences in the underlying contracting environments, especially differences in the difficulty of monitoring performance and exerting control. [source]


    FINANCIAL CONTRACTING BETWEEN MANAGERS AND VENTURE CAPITALISTS: THE ROLE OF VALUE-ADDED SERVICES, REPUTATION SEEKING, AND BARGAINING POWER

    THE JOURNAL OF FINANCIAL RESEARCH, Issue 4 2004
    Richard Fairchild
    Abstract I analyze manager and venture capitalist bargaining over the financial contract in the face of double-sided moral hazard problems. The allocation of cash flows depends on the combined effects of value-added services, reputation seeking, and bargaining power. Welfare is maximized when the venture capitalist has high value-adding capabilities, the market for reputation is informationally efficient, and the manager has bargaining power. Furthermore, I consider the effect of exit strategies on the financial agreement. I also consider bidding between venture capitalists of differing abilities. Generally, the superior venture capitalist wins with a lower bid, but in some cases the inferior venture capitalist can win. [source]


    A Must-Have Manual for Conservation Managers and Researchers

    CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, Issue 2 2003
    Grey Hayes
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Testing the "Inverted-U" Phenomenon in Moral Development on Recently Promoted Senior Managers and Partners,

    CONTEMPORARY ACCOUNTING RESEARCH, Issue 2 2004
    RICHARD A. BERNARDI
    Abstract This paper examines the change in the average level of moral development over a 7.5-year period of promotion, attrition, and survival in five Big 6 firms. The study improves upon previous cross-sectional studies that found decreases in the average level of moral development at the senior manager and partner levels, which has been referred to as the "inverted-U" phenomenon. Problems with these studies that limit the generalizability of their findings include their cross-sectional nature and samples that usually come from one or two firms. Over a 7.5-year period, we found that the participating Big 6 firms retained auditors with higher average levels of moral development (measured using the defining issues test), while those with lower average levels left the firms. The average level of moral development for new partners was at least as high as the group from which they came. This research suggests that the concern about Big 6 firms retaining a higher proportion of auditors with lower moral development may be an artifact of research design. [source]


    Audit Review: Managers' Interpersonal Expectations and Conduct of the Review,

    CONTEMPORARY ACCOUNTING RESEARCH, Issue 3 2002
    Michael Gibbins
    Abstract This paper presents an interpersonal model of audit file review centered on the audit manager. A manager's conduct of the review is affected by four components: the manager's expectations about the client, expectations about the preparer, expectations about the partner, and the manager's own approach and circumstances. The paper then presents a comprehensive field-based analysis of how a working paper review is conducted. It supplements the mostly experimental research on working paper review by reporting the results of a retrospective field questionnaire that asked audit managers to report on their behavior and their relationships with preparers and partners on actual audit engagements. The extent of review was sensitive to specific features of the client and the file (including risk factors), to features of the preparer, and particularly to the style of the reviewer, which was quite stable across cases. Although the evidence of managers' awareness of preparers' "stylizing" the file to suit the manager was weak, the evidence of managers' stylizing for the partners was pervasive, affecting both work done and documentation. Managers believed that good reviews emphasized key issues and risks rather than detail. Other new descriptive evidence on the nature of the review process is provided, including the purpose of the review process, how frequently surprises are found in the review process, and the qualities of good reviewers compared with poor reviewers. The implications of our model and our results for future research are outlined. [source]


    Critical success factors for corporate social responsibility: a public sector perspective

    CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2010
    Shirish Sangle
    Abstract Managers in the public sector consider corporate social responsibility (CSR) as strategically important for their organizations. A positive correlation between CSR and financial performance is well established in the literature. However, little research has been done to understand which factors lead to the positive correlation between CSR and business performance. This study aims to empirically analyze critical success factors (CSFs) for CSR in the Indian public sector. It seeks to evaluate the factors that make CSR successful. The research results show that ability to integrate CSR with other functional strategies is the most critical success factor for CSR. Other critical success factors are ability to manage stakeholder groups, ability to evaluate benefits of CSR and top management support. Based on the research findings, the study proposes some important managerial implications with respect to CSFs for CSR. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]


    The Role of Clinical and Process Quality in Achieving Patient Satisfaction in Hospitals

    DECISION SCIENCES, Issue 3 2004
    Kathryn A. Marley
    ABSTRACT Managers constantly struggle with where to allocate their resources and efforts in managing the complex service delivery system called a hospital. In the broadest sense, their decisions and actions focus on two important aspects of health care,clinical or technical medical care that emphasizes "what" the patient receives and process performance that emphasizes "how" health care services are delivered to patients. Here, we investigate the role of leadership, clinical quality, and process quality on patient satisfaction. A causal model is hypothesized and evaluated using structural equation modeling for a sample of 202 U.S. hospitals. Statistical results support the idea that leadership is a good exogenous construct and that clinical and process quality are good intermediate outcomes in determining patient satisfaction. Statistical results also suggest that hospital leadership has more influence on process quality than on clinical quality, which is predominantly the doctors' domain. Other results are discussed, such as that hospital managers must be mindful of the fact that process quality is at least as important as clinical quality in predicting patient satisfaction. The article concludes by proposing areas for future research. [source]


    Cash Flow Sensitivity of Investment

    EUROPEAN FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2009
    Armen Hovakimian
    G30; G31; G32 Abstract Investment cash flow sensitivity is associated with both underinvestment when cash flows are low and overinvestment when cash flows are high. The accessibility of external capital is positively correlated with cash flows, intensifying investment cash flow sensitivity. Managers actively counteract the variations in internal and external liquidity by accumulating working capital when liquidity is high and draining it when liquidity is low. These results imply that cash flow sensitive firms face financial constraints, which are binding in low cash flow years. Traditional indicators of financial constraints, such as size and dividend payout, successfully distinguish firms that may potentially face constraints, but are less successful in distinguishing between periods of tight and relaxed constraints. These periods are much more clearly separated by the KZ index, which, on the other hand, is less successful in identifying firms that are likely to face liquidity constraints. [source]


    Value Maximisation, Stakeholder Theory, and the Corporate Objective Function

    EUROPEAN FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2001
    Michael Jensen
    This paper examines the role of the corporate objective function in corporate productivity and efficiency, social welfare, and the accountability of managers and directors. I argue that since it is logically impossible to maximise in more than one dimension, purposeful behaviour requires a single valued objective function. Two hundred years of work in economics and finance implies that in the absence of externalities and monopoly (and when all goods are priced), social welfare is maximised when each firm in an economy maximises its total market value. Total value is not just the value of the equity but also includes the market values of all other financial claims including debt, preferred stock, and warrants. In sharp contrast stakeholder theory, argues that managers should make decisions so as to take account of the interests of all stakeholders in a firm (including not only financial claimants, but also employees, customers, communities, governmental officials and under some interpretations the environment, terrorists and blackmailers). Because the advocates of stakeholder theory refuse to specify how to make the necessary tradeoffs among these competing interests they leave managers with a theory that makes it impossible for them to make purposeful decisions. With no way to keep score, stakeholder theory makes managers unaccountable for their actions. It seems clear that such a theory can be attractive to the self interest of managers and directors. Creating value takes more than acceptance of value maximisation as the organisational objective. As a statement of corporate purpose or vision, value maximisation is not likely to tap into the energy and enthusiasm of employees and managers to create value. Seen in this light, change in long-term market value becomes the scorecard that managers, directors, and others use to assess success or failure of the organisation. The choice of value maximisation as the corporate scorecard must be complemented by a corporate vision, strategy and tactics that unite participants in the organisation in its struggle for dominance in its competitive arena. A firm cannot maximise value if it ignores the interest of its stakeholders. I offer a proposal to clarify what I believe is the proper relation between value maximisation and stakeholder theory. I call it enlightened value maximisation, and it is identical to what I call enlightened stakeholder theory. Enlightened value maximisation utilises much of the structure of stakeholder theory but accepts maximisation of the long run value of the firm as the criterion for making the requisite tradeoffs among its stakeholders. Managers, directors, strategists, and management scientists can benefit from enlightened stakeholder theory. Enlightened stakeholder theory specifies long-term value maximisation or value seeking as the firm's objective and therefore solves the problems that arise from the multiple objectives that accompany traditional stakeholder theory. I also discuss the Balanced Scorecard, the managerial equivalent of stakeholder theory. The same conclusions hold. Balanced Scorecard theory is flawed because it presents managers with a scorecard which gives no score,that is, no single-valued measure of how they have performed. Thus managers evaluated with such a system (which can easily have two dozen measures and provides no information on the tradeoffs between them) have no way to make principled or purposeful decisions. The solution is to define a true (single dimensional) score for measuring performance for the organisation or division (and it must be consistent with the organisation's strategy). Given this we then encourage managers to use measures of the drivers of performance to understand better how to maximise their score. And as long as their score is defined properly, (and for lower levels in the organisation it will generally not be value) this will enhance their contribution to the firm. [source]


    Not-for-Profit Annual Reports: What do Museum Managers Communicate?

    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY & MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2003
    Anne L. Christensen
    This study addresses: (1) What disclosures are provided in annual reports of not-for-profit entities?(2) What characteristics of the reporting entities explain variations in the quantity of financial disclosure?(3) How do not-for-profit disclosures compare with those in for-profit corporate reports? The annual reports of 170 not-for-profit museums were examined. The reports were highly variable. Some contained no financial data and only 22 percent included complete financial statements with footnotes. Regression analysis indicated that the amount of museum financial data was positively associated with museum size, a larger number of pages of donor disclosures, and museum type (art and history, but not science, natural history, or general). [source]


    The Attitudes of British National Health Service Managers and Clinicians Towards the Introduction of Benchmarking

    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY & MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2002
    C. S. Jones
    This paper describes an empirical study, conducted in three acute hospitals, of the attitudes of central managers, medical managers and clinicians towards the adoption of benchmarking. Benchmarking was portrayed in The New NHS White Paper (1997) as an important means of improving efficiency over the next decade. The present paper examines the context of change and nature of benchmarking. Findings are presented in seven sections including: the understanding which respondents had of benchmarking; their willingness to be involved in benchmarking; the existence of strategies and policies for implementing benchmarking; the relevance of existing costing information; and the role of networks in facilitating benchmarking. The study concludes that the process of change adopted contradicted most of the factors associated with creating receptivity to change. Also, that the publication of the National Reference Costs seemed to have more relevance to resource planning at central National Health Service Management Executive level, than to effecting improvements at operational level in acute hospitals. [source]


    The Relation between Stakeholder Management, Firm Value, and CEO Compensation: A Test of Enlightened Value Maximization

    FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2010
    Bradley W. Benson
    Whether firms pursue shareholder value maximization or the maximization of stakeholder welfare is a controversial issue whose outcomes seem irreconcilable. We propose that firms are likely to compensate their executives for pursuing the firm's goal be it shareholder value maximization or the maximization of stakeholder welfare. In this paper, we examine the correlation between firm value, stakeholder management, and compensation. We find that stakeholder management is positively related to firm value. However, firms do not compensate managers for having good relationships with its stakeholders. These results do not support stakeholder theory. We also find an endogenous association between compensation and firm value. Our results are consistent with Jensen's (2001) enlightened value maximization theory. Managers are compensated for achieving the firm's ultimate goal, value maximization. However, managers optimize interaction with stakeholders to accomplish this objective. [source]


    Measuring Investment Distortions when Risk-Averse Managers Decide Whether to Undertake Risky Projects

    FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2005
    Robert Parrino
    We create a dynamic model in which a self-interested, risk-averse manager makes corporate investment decisions at a levered firm with characteristics typical of public US firms. We examine the magnitude of distortions in those decisions when a new project changes firm risk and find expected changes in the values of future tax shields and bankruptcy costs to be important factors. We evaluate the extent to which these distortions vary with firm leverage, debt duration, project size, managerial risk aversion, managerial non-firm wealth, and the structure of management compensation packages [source]


    Optimal Incentive Contracts for Loss-Averse Managers: Stock Options versus Restricted Stock Grants

    FINANCIAL REVIEW, Issue 4 2006
    Anna Dodonova
    G39; M52 Abstract This paper provides an explanation for the widespread use of stock option grants in executive compensation. It shows that the optimal incentive contract for loss-averse managers must contain a substantial portion of stock options even when it should consist exclusively of stock grants for "classical" risk-averse managers. The paper also provides an explanation for the drastic increase in the risk-adjusted level of CEO compensations over the past two decades and argues that more option-based compensation should be used in firms with higher cash flow volatility and in industries with a higher degree of heterogeneity among firms. [source]


    Initial Public Offerings: CFO Perceptions

    FINANCIAL REVIEW, Issue 4 2006
    James C. Brau
    G14; G24; G32; G34 Abstract We examine four issues pertaining to initial public offerings (IPOs) using a survey of 438 chief financial officers (CFOs). First, why do firms go public? Second, is CFO sentiment stationary across bear and bull markets? Third, what concerns CFOs about going public? Fourth, do CFO perceptions correlate with returns? Results support funding for growth and liquidity as the primary reasons for IPOs. CFO sentiment is generally stationary in pre- and post-bubble years. Managers are concerned with the direct costs of going public, such as underwriting fees, as well as indirect costs. We find a negative relation between a focus on immediate growth and long-term abnormal returns. [source]


    River restoration, habitat heterogeneity and biodiversity: a failure of theory or practice?

    FRESHWATER BIOLOGY, Issue 2010
    MARGARET A. PALMER
    Summary 1. Stream ecosystems are increasingly impacted by multiple stressors that lead to a loss of sensitive species and an overall reduction in diversity. A dominant paradigm in ecological restoration is that increasing habitat heterogeneity (HH) promotes restoration of biodiversity. This paradigm is reflected in stream restoration projects through the common practice of re-configuring channels to add meanders and adding physical structures such as boulders and artificial riffles to restore biodiversity by enhancing structural heterogeneity. 2. To evaluate the validity of this paradigm, we completed an extensive evaluation of published studies that have quantitatively examined the reach-scale response of invertebrate species richness to restoration actions that increased channel complexity/HH. We also evaluated studies that used manipulative or correlative approaches to test for a relationship between physical heterogeneity and invertebrate diversity in streams that were not in need of restoration. 3. We found habitat and macroinvertebrate data for 78 independent stream or river restoration projects described by 18 different author groups in which invertebrate taxa richness data in response to the restoration treatment were available. Most projects were successful in enhancing physical HH; however, only two showed statistically significant increases in biodiversity rendering them more similar to reference reaches or sites. 4. Studies manipulating structural complexity in otherwise healthy streams were generally small in scale and less than half showed a significant positive relationship with invertebrate diversity. Only one-third of the studies that attempted to correlate biodiversity to existing levels of in-stream heterogeneity found a positive relationship. 5. Across all the studies we evaluated, there is no evidence that HH was the primary factor controlling stream invertebrate diversity, particularly in a restoration context. The findings indicate that physical heterogeneity should not be the driving force in selecting restoration approaches for most degraded waterways. Evidence suggests that much more must be done to restore streams impacted by multiple stressors than simply re-configuring channels and enhancing structural complexity with meanders, boulders, wood, or other structures. 6. Thematic implications: as integrators of all activities on the land, streams are sensitive to a host of stressors including impacts from urbanisation, agriculture, deforestation, invasive species, flow regulation, water extractions and mining. The impacts of these individually or in combination typically lead to a decrease in biodiversity because of reduced water quality, biologically unsuitable flow regimes, dispersal barriers, altered inputs of organic matter or sunlight, degraded habitat, etc. Despite the complexity of these stressors, a large number of stream restoration projects focus primarily on physical channel characteristics. We show that this is not a wise investment if ecological recovery is the goal. Managers should critically diagnose the stressors impacting an impaired stream and invest resources first in repairing those problems most likely to limit restoration. [source]


    Hispanic Women Managers and Professionals: Reflections on Life and Work

    GENDER, WORK & ORGANISATION, Issue 1 2007
    Linda M. Hite
    Much of the research on professional and managerial women actually describes the experiences of White women, excluding those of other racial and ethnic backgrounds. This exploratory qualitative study focuses on the life and work experiences of Hispanic women in managerial and professional positions and how those experiences influence their career possibilities. Data from individual interviews of first-, second- and third-generation Hispanic women in the USA are used to illustrate a framework of career possibilities that reflects both cultural and personal perspectives. Implications for further study are addressed. [source]


    Childlessness and Women Managers: ,Choice', Context and Discourses

    GENDER, WORK & ORGANISATION, Issue 4 2006
    Glenice J. Wood
    Childlessness is increasing and might reflect acceptance of diversity, scope for individual choice and a creative ,social imaginary' about being feminine without being a mother. Childlessness also appears to have a contextual manifestation arising from the recognition that the long-hours work culture in many organizations does not support appropriate parenting. A qualitative study of Australian managers reveals the contradictory discourses of childlessness around enlightened equality, maternalism, an elusive, ideal ,work,life balance' and individualism. The article explores a contextually nuanced, dynamic, generative theory of agency which does not hinge on the mother,child dyad, in explaining women managers' choices to remain childless. [source]


    Managers,The missing link in the reward change process

    GLOBAL BUSINESS AND ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE, Issue 2 2005
    Thomas O. Davenport
    Driven by economic and regulatory forces, many organizations are making wholesale changes in such employee rewards as equity compensation, retirement plans, and health care benefits. Any change in rewards can affect employee motivation and commitment, and poorly implemented reward change can have disastrous outcomes. Organizations must pay attention to all the factors at play,rational and emotional,by laying a solid foundation for reward change and involving managers throughout the organization. Supervisors and managers play an essential role in building a credible case for change and implementing change in a way that employees see as fair and reasonable. 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    Currents: Books in Brief

    GLOBAL BUSINESS AND ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE, Issue 3 2001
    LaRoi Lawton
    The Roots and Future of Management Theory Profit From the Core: Growth Strategy in an Era of Turbulence 90 Days to Launch: Internet Projects on Time and on Budget The Six Sigma Revolution: How General Electric and Others Turned Process into Profits In Good Company Evolve! Succeeding in the Digital Culture of Tomorrow Lessons from the Heart of American Business: A Roadmap for Managers in the 21st Century The Passion Plan at Work: A Step-by-Step Guide to Building a Passion-Driven Organization The Inner Work of Leaders: Leadership as a Habit of Mind Corporate Sin: Leaderless Leadership and Dissonant Workers The HR Scorecard Place to Space: Migrating to Ebusiness Models Building the Integrated Company Protecting Your Company's Intellectual Property: A Practical Guide to Trademarks, Copyrights, Patents, & Trade Secrets Gaming the System: Stop Playing the Organizational Game [source]


    Principles for Public Management Practice: From Dichotomies to Interdependence

    GOVERNANCE, Issue 3 2001
    Martha S. Feldman
    In this essay we explore the relationship between management practices and a basic governance dilemma: how to manage flexibly and accountably. The challenge is both practical and theoretical. Managers must respond flexibly to the changing demands and expectations of the public and the ever-changing nature of public problems, yet they must do so in a manner that provides accountability to the public and political overseers. A dichotomous approach to the study of leadership as management action and the governance structures within which managers operate has inhibited the search for a public management theory that reconciles the dilemma. Emphasis upon managers as leaders typically focuses on the flexible actions managers might take to overcome structural "barriers," while emphasis upon governance structures typically focuses on the essential role of structure in ensuring accountability and restraining or motivating particular management efforts. The practicing manager, however, cannot deal with these aspects of the work separately. Managers must attend to demands for both flexible leadership action and structures that promise accountability. Anecdotal evidence provides illustrations of some of the ways that managers can integrate these demands. We suggest that these efforts point to an alternative theoretical framework that understands action and structure as mutually constitutive, creating a dynamic tension in which attention to one requires attention to the other. [source]


    Stakeholders' views on measuring outcomes for people with learning disabilities

    HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE IN THE COMMUNITY, Issue 1 2006
    Anita F. Young PhD DipCOT
    Abstract What works and how do we know? These are recurring questions for health and social care professionals, although mediated through differing philosophies and historical perspectives. The aims of the study reported here were to discover views of managers and commissioners of services for people with learning disabilities in Scotland regarding (a) current approaches to service evaluation (as an indication of what is to be measured) and (b) healthcare outcome measurement (as an indication of preferences regarding how this should be measured). A postal questionnaire was used to survey 94 stakeholders from the NHS, Local Authorities, and non-statutory organisations across Scotland. Respondents' views were sought on current approaches to service evaluation within learning disabilities; outcome measurement; appropriateness of specified methods of measuring health outcomes; desired future methods of outcome measurement within learning disabilities; and service user involvement in care. A 77% (73/94) response rate to the questionnaire was achieved. Different methods of service evaluation were used by different stakeholders. Staff appraisal was the most frequently identified method (used by 85% of respondents). Specific outcome measures were used by 32% of respondents although there were differences of opinion as to what constitutes specific outcome measures. Overall there was strong support for goal-setting and reviewing (83%) and individualised outcome measures (75%) as appropriate methods for use with people with learning disabilities. The hypothetical question asking what outcome measures should be introduced for this client group had by far the lowest response rate (51/73). The overwhelming majority of all respondents, 68 (92%), reported user involvement in their service. Staff ambivalence to outcome measurement was evident in the research and respondents highlighted the complexity and multidimensional nature of outcomes for this service user group. Managers recognised that outcome measurement was expected but were uncertain how to go about it. [source]


    Health Policy Roundtable: Producing and Adapting Research Syntheses for Use by Health-System Managers and Public Policymakers

    HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 3p1 2006
    Christina E. Folz
    First page of article [source]


    The effects of alternative reports of human resource development results on managerial support

    HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2003
    Brent W. Mattson
    Managerial responses to human resource development (HRD) results evaluation reports were experimentally investigated as a function of (1) how evaluation information was presented and (2) reported HRD program impact levels. Managers (n = 233) read a business scenario in which they were asked to make a decision about whether to implement a development program. They were then exposed to one of nine experimental treatment conditions (evaluation report type reported program impact level). The report types included utility analysis, critical outcome technique, and anecdotal evaluation reports. Results were varied at three impact levels (low, average, and high). Findings of the study showed that managers perceived utility analysis and critical outcome technique reports as almost equally useful in decision making; however, the anecdotal evaluation report was found to be significantly less useful than either of the other two report types. There was no effect of the reported program impact level on the perceived usefulness of the evaluation reports for decision making. Furthermore, there was no interaction between report type and impact level on the perceived usefulness of the reports for decision making. These findings show that managers prefer information about the financial results of HRD interventions to anecdotal information, regardless of the reported level of impact. [source]