Major Life Events (major + life_event)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Psychopathology is associated with dyspeptic symptom severity in primary care patients with a new episode of dyspepsia

ALIMENTARY PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS, Issue 5 2009
S. MUJAKOVIC
Summary Background, Personality and psychiatric disorders are reported to be more common in dyspeptic patients with severe complaints, but it remains unclear whether this association exists for patients with mild and moderate dyspepsia. Aim, To study the association between dyspeptic symptom severity and psychopathology, major life events and coping ability in patients with a new episode of dyspepsia. Methods, Dyspeptic symptom severity was measured using the validated eight symptom Veldhuyzen van Zanten questionnaire. Psychopathology was measured using the Symptom Check List-90 (SCL 90). Major life events were measured with a modified version of the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS). Coping styles were measured by a short version of the Utrecht Coping Questionnaire, distinguishing six coping styles. Linear regression was used to assess the relationship between dyspepsia symptom severity and psychological factors. Results, In all, 664 patients with a new episode of uninvestigated dyspepsia, aged >18 years were included. Dyspeptic symptom severity was positively correlated with the presence of depression (P < 0.01), somatization symptoms (P < 0.01), use of an active coping style (P < 0.01) and negatively correlated with age (P < 0.01). Conclusions, Primary care patients consulting with dyspepsia have higher levels of depression and somatization especially at younger age. An active coping style is associated with dyspepsia symptom severity. [source]


Living donor liver transplantation and its effect on the donor,recipient relationship , a qualitative interview study with donors

CLINICAL TRANSPLANTATION, Issue 3 2009
C. Papachristou
Abstract:, An important aspect in the preoperative evaluation and a legal precondition for an living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is a family or emotionally close relationship between donor and recipient. We investigated the development of the donor,recipient relationship after LDLT. We conducted semi-structured clinical interviews with 18 donors as part of a regular postoperative follow-up and analyzed them using the method of Grounded Theory. The donation does not lead to any major changes in the donor-recipient relationship, probably due to careful pre-selection. It does however enhance the existing positive or conflicting character of the relationship. Donors sometimes downplay negative aspects in the relationship and emphasize the improvement as a way of dealing with a major life event. A donation cannot fulfill expectations linked to it and it is unfavorable to be used to improve the relationship. Potential misuse or instrumentalization of the donation by the donor are possible. Postoperative feelings of gratitude are an issue after surgery. A good relationship enhances a better management of the postoperative course. The preoperative donor,recipient relationship should be as free of conflict as possible. A thorough preoperative evaluation of the donor,recipient relationship is particularly important to assess the donors' suitability and clarify conflicts and unrealistic expectations. [source]


Cumulative parenting stress across the preschool period: relations to maternal parenting and child behaviour at age 5

INFANT AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 2 2005
Keith A. Crnic
Abstract Despite increasing interest in the effects of parenting stress on children and families, many questions remain regarding the nature of parenting stress and the mechanism through which stress exerts its influence across time. In this study, cumulative parenting stress was assessed across the preschool period in a sample of 125 typically developing children and their mothers. Indices of parenting stress included both major life events stress-assessed annually from age 3 to 5, and parenting daily hassles assessed every 6 months across the same period. Naturalistic home observations were conducted when children were age 5, during which measures of parent and child interactive behaviour as well as dyadic pleasure and dyadic conflict were obtained. Mothers also completed the CBCL to assess children's behaviour problems. Results indicated that parenting daily hassles and major life stress are relatively stable across the preschool period. Both cumulative stress indices also proved to be important predictors of parent and child behaviour and dyadic interaction, although the predictions were somewhat differential. Despite meaningful relations between the stress factors and child well being, no evidence was found to support the premise that parent behaviour mediates the association between parenting stress and child outcomes. Results are discussed within a developmental framework to understand the stability and complexity of cumulative stress associations to early parent,child relationships. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Psychopathology is associated with dyspeptic symptom severity in primary care patients with a new episode of dyspepsia

ALIMENTARY PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS, Issue 5 2009
S. MUJAKOVIC
Summary Background, Personality and psychiatric disorders are reported to be more common in dyspeptic patients with severe complaints, but it remains unclear whether this association exists for patients with mild and moderate dyspepsia. Aim, To study the association between dyspeptic symptom severity and psychopathology, major life events and coping ability in patients with a new episode of dyspepsia. Methods, Dyspeptic symptom severity was measured using the validated eight symptom Veldhuyzen van Zanten questionnaire. Psychopathology was measured using the Symptom Check List-90 (SCL 90). Major life events were measured with a modified version of the Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS). Coping styles were measured by a short version of the Utrecht Coping Questionnaire, distinguishing six coping styles. Linear regression was used to assess the relationship between dyspepsia symptom severity and psychological factors. Results, In all, 664 patients with a new episode of uninvestigated dyspepsia, aged >18 years were included. Dyspeptic symptom severity was positively correlated with the presence of depression (P < 0.01), somatization symptoms (P < 0.01), use of an active coping style (P < 0.01) and negatively correlated with age (P < 0.01). Conclusions, Primary care patients consulting with dyspepsia have higher levels of depression and somatization especially at younger age. An active coping style is associated with dyspepsia symptom severity. [source]


Cultural Models and Fertility Timing among Cherokee and White Youth in Appalachia: Beyond the Mode

AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 4 2009
Ryan A. Brown
ABSTRACT Much anthropological research and theory concerns how group differences in behavior, subjective experience, and ways of seeing the world (i.e., cultural differences) are created and maintained. Both within and outside the United States, there are dramatic group differences in fertility. In the United States, American Indian groups exhibit some of the highest and earliest fertility. We used ethnographic data as well as structured card-sort and questionnaire data to compare cultural models of childbearing among Cherokee and white youth in Appalachia. The critical difference between Cherokee and white youth was not a modal difference in ideal ages for first childbirth but, rather, the degree of latitude for the timing of having children vis--vis other major life events. Group differences in modal norms are often posited as the critical axis of group distinction. In many cases, group differences in the intrapopulation variability among multiple norms may play a more critical role. [source]


Sibling Relationships During the Transition to Adulthood

CHILD DEVELOPMENT PERSPECTIVES, Issue 2 2010
Katherine Jewsbury Conger
Abstract, Recent research has shed new light on individual development during the early adulthood years, yet few investigators have examined sibling relationships during this stage of life. These relationships undergo transformations as individuals enter adult roles and orient their lives toward friends and romantic partners and establish independence from parents and siblings. This article examines major life events and role transitions, such as leaving home, completing school, obtaining employment, getting married, and having children, that influence individuals and their sibling relationships. In addition, it considers how sibling relationships may affect individuals during the transition to adulthood and calls attention to the importance of family and cultural contexts in shaping these relationships. The article concludes with suggestions for future research on sibling relationships during early adulthood and beyond. [source]