MRI Score (mri + score)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Central bone marrow lesions in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis and their relationship to anterior cruciate ligament tears and cartilage loss

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 1 2008
Gabriela Hernández-Molina
Objective Medial and lateral compartment bone marrow lesions (BMLs) have been tied to cartilage loss. We undertook this study to assess 2 types of BMLs in the central region of the knee (type 1 BMLs, which are related anatomically to anterior cruciate ligament [ACL]/posterior cruciate ligament [PCL] insertions, and type 2 BMLs, which encompass both the central region and either the medial or the lateral compartment) and determine their relationship to cartilage loss and ACL tears. Methods Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee was performed at baseline and at followup (15 and/or 30 months) in 258 subjects with symptomatic osteoarthritis (OA). At baseline, we assessed ACL tears and central BMLs located at or between the tibial spines or adjacent to the femoral notch. Cartilage loss was present if the score in any region of the tibiofemoral joint increased by ,1 units at the last available followup, using a modified Whole-Organ MRI Score. We used logistic regression adjusted for alignment, body mass index, Kellgren/Lawrence score, sex, and age. Results One hundred thirty-nine knees (53.8%) had central BMLs, of which 129 had type 1 BMLs (96 abutted the ACL and had no coexistent type 2 features) and 25 had type 2 BMLs (often overlapped with type 1). Type 1 lesions were associated with ACL tears (odds ratio [OR] 5.9, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.2,16.2) but not with cartilage loss (OR 1.6, 95% CI 0.8,3.1), while medial type 2 BMLs were related to medial cartilage loss (OR 6.1, 95% CI 1.0,35.2). Conclusion Central BMLs that abutted the ACL were highly prevalent and strongly related to ACL pathology, suggesting a role of enthesopathy in OA. Only BMLs with medial extension were related to ipsilateral cartilage loss. [source]


A new magnetic resonance imaging scoring method for assessment of haemophilic arthropathy

HAEMOPHILIA, Issue 4 2004
B. Lundin
Summary., In a European multicentre study, 39 ankles in 28 haemophilic boys were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A new MRI score was developed in the format A(e:s:h) for evaluating haemophilic arthropathy. This scheme provides high resolution and allows separation of different pathological components. The factor A is calculated as the sum of scores for subchondral cysts (maximum value 6), irregularity/erosion of subchondral cortex (maximum 4) and chondral destruction (maximum 6); e, s and h, respectively, represent effusion/haemarthrosis, synovial hypertrophy and haemosiderin deposition, and they are separately evaluated on a scale of 0,4. Working independently, two radiologists scored the 39 ankles twice using both this new ,European' scoring method and a previously published ,Denver' scoring scheme. Final classification was achieved by consensus. The reproducibility of the readings was assessed, and for both scoring methods the results indicated good or moderate intraobserver agreement, and good, moderate or fair interobserver agreement. These findings suggest that MRI can be useful for semiquantitative evaluation of haemophilic arthropathy, providing the examination is performed according to an appropriate protocol, and the images are evaluated by specially trained radiologists. [source]


MRI tissue characterization of experimental cerebral ischemia in rat

JOURNAL OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING, Issue 4 2003
Hamid Soltanian-Zadeh PhD
Abstract Purpose To extend the ISODATA image segmentation method to characterize tissue damage in stroke, by generating an MRI score for each tissue that corresponds to its histological damage. Materials and Methods After preprocessing and segmentation (using ISODATA clustering), the proposed method scores tissue regions between 1 and 100. Score 1 is assigned to normal brain matter (white or gray matter), and score 100 to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Lesion zones are assigned a score based on their relative levels of similarities to normal brain matter and CSF. To evaluate the method, 15 rats were imaged by a 7T MRI system at one of three time points (acute, subacute, chronic) after MCA occlusion. Then they were killed and their brains were sliced and prepared for histological studies. MRI of two or three slices of each rat brain (using two DWI (b = 400, b = 800), one PDWI, one T2WI, and one T1WI) was performed, and an MRI score between 1 and 100 was determined for each region. Segmented regions were mapped onto the histology images and scored on a scale of 1,10 by an experienced pathologist. The MRI scores were validated by comparison with histology scores. To this end, correlation coefficients between the two scores (MRI and histology) were determined. Results Experimental results showed excellent correlations between MRI and histology scores at different time points. Depending on the reference tissue (gray matter or white matter) used in the standardization, the correlation coefficients ranged from 0.73 (P < 0.0001) to 0.78 (P < 0.0001) using the entire dataset, including acute, subacute, and chronic time points. This suggests that the proposed multiparametric approach accurately identified and characterized ischemic tissue in a rat model of cerebral ischemia at different stages of stroke evolution. Conclusion The proposed approach scores tissue regions and characterizes them using unsupervised clustering and multiparametric image analysis techniques. The method can be used for a variety of applications in the field of computer-aided diagnosis and treatment, including evaluation of response to treatment. For example, volume changes for different zones of the lesion over time (e.g., tissue recovery) can be evaluated. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2003;17:398,409. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Clinical and imaging efficacy of infliximab in HLA,B27,Positive patients with magnetic resonance imaging,determined early sacroiliitis,

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 4 2009
Nick Barkham
Objective To evaluate the efficacy of infliximab in HLA,B27,positive patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),determined early sacroiliitis, using both clinical and MRI assessments. Methods Forty patients with recent-onset inflammatory back pain, as assessed by the Calin criteria, HLA,B27 positivity, clinical disease activity as measured by the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), pain and morning stiffness, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI),determined sacroiliac joint bone edema were randomized in a double-blind manner to receive infliximab 5 mg/kg or placebo at 0, 2, 6, and 12 weeks. MRI scans were performed at baseline and 16 weeks and scored by 2 observers (blinded to both the order of the scans and to treatment group), using the Leeds scoring system. Clinical assessments included the BASDAI, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) instrument, the ASsessment in Ankylosing Spondylitis International Working Group criteria (ASAS) for improvement, and markers of inflammation. Results The mean reduction in the total MRI score from week 0 to week 16 was significantly greater in infliximab-treated patients compared with placebo-treated patients (P = 0.033). On average, significantly more lesions resolved in the infliximab group (P < 0.001), while significantly more new lesions developed in the placebo group (P = 0.004). Significantly greater improvement in the infliximab group versus the placebo group was also observed for changes from week 0 to week 16 in the BASDAI (P = 0.002), BASFI (P = 0.004), and ASQoL (P = 0.007) scores. Responses according to the ASAS criteria for 40% improvement, the ASAS criteria for 20% improvement in 5 of 6 domains, and ASAS partial remission were achieved by 61%, 44%, and 56% of infliximab-treated patients, respectively. Infliximab was well tolerated, and no serious adverse events were observed. Conclusion Infliximab was an effective therapy for early sacroiliitis, providing a reduction in disease activity by week 16. This study is the first to show that infliximab is effective for reducing clinical and imaging evidence of disease activity in patients with MRI-determined early axial spondylarthritis. [source]


Bone edema scored on magnetic resonance imaging scans of the dominant carpus at presentation predicts radiographic joint damage of the hands and feet six years later in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 7 2003
Fiona M. McQueen
Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of revealing synovitis and tendinitis in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as bone edema and erosion. These features are visible before radiographic joint damage occurs. We sought to examine whether MRI of one body region (the wrist) can be used to predict whole-body radiography scores reflecting joint damage at 6 years. Methods We conducted a 6-year prospective study of a cohort of patients who fulfilled the criteria for RA at presentation, using clinical parameters, radiographs, and MRI scans of the dominant wrist. Of the 42 patients enrolled at baseline, full MRI, radiographic, and clinical data were available for 31 at 6-year followup. MRI scans were scored by 2 radiologists, using a validated scoring system. Radiographs of the hands and feet were graded using the modified Sharp scoring method. MRI and radiography scores obtained at baseline and 6 years were compared, and baseline MRI scores were examined for their ability to predict radiographic outcome at 6 years. Results At 6 years, the total Sharp score correlated significantly with the total MRI score and the MRI erosion score (r = 0.81, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.79, P < 0.0001, respectively). The 6-year Sharp score also correlated with the baseline total MRI and MRI erosion scores (r = 0.56, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.33, P = 0.03, respectively). MRI synovitis and bone edema scores remained constant for the group as a whole over 6 years, but bone erosion scores progressed (P = 0.0001), consistent with radiographic deterioration. Erosions on 6-year MRI scans were frequently preceded by MRI bone edema at baseline (odds ratio 6.5, 95% confidence interval 2.78,18.1). Regression models indicated that the baseline MRI bone edema score was predictive of the 6-year total Sharp score (P = 0.01), as was the C-reactive protein (CRP) level (P = 0.0002). Neither shared epitope status nor swollen or tender joint counts predicted radiographic outcome in this cohort. A model incorporating baseline MRI scores for erosion, bone edema, synovitis, and tendinitis plus the CRP level and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate explained 59% of the variance in the 6-year total Sharp score (R2 = 0.59, adjusted R2 = 0.44). Conclusion MRI scans performed at the first presentation of RA can be used to help predict future radiographic damage, allowing disease-modifying therapy to be targeted to patients with aggressive disease. [source]


Reliability and construct validity of the compatible MRI scoring system for evaluation of elbows in haemophilic children

HAEMOPHILIA, Issue 2 2008
A. S. DORIA
Summary., We assessed the reliability and construct validity of the Compatible MRI scale for evaluation of elbows, and compared the diagnostic performance of MRI and radiographs for assessment of these joints. Twenty-nine MR examinations of elbows from 27 boys with haemophilia A and B [age range, 5,17 years (mean, 11.5)] were independently read by four blinded radiologists on two occasions. Three centres participated in the study: (Toronto, n = 24 examinations; Atlanta, n = 3; Cuiaba, n = 2). The number of previous joint bleeds and severity of haemophilia were reference standard measures. The inter-reader reliability of MRI scores was substantial (ICC = 0.73) for the additive (A)-scale and excellent (ICC = 0.83) for the progressive (P)-scale. The intrareader reliability was excellent for both P-scores (ICC = 0.91) and A-scores (ICC = 0.93). The total P- and A-scores correlated poorly (r = 0.36) or moderately (r = 0.54), but positively, with clinical-laboratory measurements. The total MRI scores demonstrated high accuracy for discrimination of presence or absence of arthropathy [P-scale, area-under-the-curve (AUC) = 0.94 ± 0.05; A-scale, AUC = 0.89 ± 0.06], as did the soft tissue scores of both scales (P-scale, AUC = 0.90 ± 0.06; A-scale, AUC = 0.86 ± 0.06). Areas-under-the-curve used to discriminate severe disease demonstrated high accuracy for both P-MRI scores (AUC = 0.83 ± 0.09) and A-MRI scores (AUC = 0.87 ± 0.09), but non-diagnostic ability to discriminate mild disease. Similar results were noted for radiographic scales. In conclusion, both MRI scales demonstrated substantial to excellent reliability and accuracy for discrimination of presence/absence of arthropathy, and severe/non-severe disease, but poor to moderate convergent validity for total scores and non-diagnostic discriminant validity for mild/non-mild disease. Compared with radiographic scores, MRI scales did not perform better for discrimination of severity of arthropathy. [source]


Bone edema scored on magnetic resonance imaging scans of the dominant carpus at presentation predicts radiographic joint damage of the hands and feet six years later in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 7 2003
Fiona M. McQueen
Objective Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of revealing synovitis and tendinitis in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as well as bone edema and erosion. These features are visible before radiographic joint damage occurs. We sought to examine whether MRI of one body region (the wrist) can be used to predict whole-body radiography scores reflecting joint damage at 6 years. Methods We conducted a 6-year prospective study of a cohort of patients who fulfilled the criteria for RA at presentation, using clinical parameters, radiographs, and MRI scans of the dominant wrist. Of the 42 patients enrolled at baseline, full MRI, radiographic, and clinical data were available for 31 at 6-year followup. MRI scans were scored by 2 radiologists, using a validated scoring system. Radiographs of the hands and feet were graded using the modified Sharp scoring method. MRI and radiography scores obtained at baseline and 6 years were compared, and baseline MRI scores were examined for their ability to predict radiographic outcome at 6 years. Results At 6 years, the total Sharp score correlated significantly with the total MRI score and the MRI erosion score (r = 0.81, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.79, P < 0.0001, respectively). The 6-year Sharp score also correlated with the baseline total MRI and MRI erosion scores (r = 0.56, P < 0.0001 and r = 0.33, P = 0.03, respectively). MRI synovitis and bone edema scores remained constant for the group as a whole over 6 years, but bone erosion scores progressed (P = 0.0001), consistent with radiographic deterioration. Erosions on 6-year MRI scans were frequently preceded by MRI bone edema at baseline (odds ratio 6.5, 95% confidence interval 2.78,18.1). Regression models indicated that the baseline MRI bone edema score was predictive of the 6-year total Sharp score (P = 0.01), as was the C-reactive protein (CRP) level (P = 0.0002). Neither shared epitope status nor swollen or tender joint counts predicted radiographic outcome in this cohort. A model incorporating baseline MRI scores for erosion, bone edema, synovitis, and tendinitis plus the CRP level and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate explained 59% of the variance in the 6-year total Sharp score (R2 = 0.59, adjusted R2 = 0.44). Conclusion MRI scans performed at the first presentation of RA can be used to help predict future radiographic damage, allowing disease-modifying therapy to be targeted to patients with aggressive disease. [source]