Lower Right (lower + right)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Regenerative Medicine: (Adv. Mater.

ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 32-33 2009
32-33/2009)
Biomaterials are essential "elements" in Regenerative Medicine strategies. The role of such smart polymer systems (center left) is to support or control the endogenous regeneration for a specific duration and therefore are designed to degrade (upper left), to control cell function (lower right), substitute the extracellular matrix (background), or to control the sustained release of bioactive molecules (upper right). Images in the front cover courtesy of Andreas Lendlein, Dieter Hofmann, Anna Marie Lipski, Michael Schossig, Jay C. Sy, and V. Prasad Shastri. [source]


Cover Picture: Acceleration of Calcite Kinetics by Abalone Nacre Proteins (Adv. Mater.

ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 22 2005
22/2005)
Abstract Abalone utilizes a system of macromolecular matrices and soluble proteins to produce beautiful and mechanically robust shells. The cover shows work by Qiu and co-workers reported on p.,2678, in which AP8 proteins isolated from the shell of red abalone are shown to alter the growth of calcite both by accelerating the rate and modifying the shape from the simple rhombohedra seen in the upper left of the scheme to the more complex form seem in the lower right. The changes are made manifest at an atomic scale through alterations in the growth speed and shape of the atomic steps that form the growth hillocks (background). [source]


Integrated inductors on porous silicon

PHYSICA STATUS SOLIDI (A) APPLICATIONS AND MATERIALS SCIENCE, Issue 5 2007
H. Contopanagos
The cover picture illustrates the effective use of a thick porous silicon layer as an integrated micro-plate for RF isolation on a silicon substrate, proposed by Harry Contopanagos and Androula Nassiopoulou in their Original Paper [1] in the current issue. What is plotted is the magnitude of the current distribution (colour coded from blue (low) to high (red) values) on the metallization and on a screen 50 Ám underneath the bottom oxide layer of a 2-metal integrated CMOS-compatible inductor on bulk silicon (lower right) and on a 50 Ám thick porous silicon layer (upper left) for a frequency of 2.5 GHz. Inductors were designed in a standard 0.13 Ám CMOS technology. Efficient RF isolation is produced by the porous Si layer, as evidenced by the virtual elimination of surface currents relative to the case of standard CMOS, indicating virtually complete substrate shielding by a 50 Ám thick porous Si layer for the relevant size scale. The quality factor of the inductor with the use of the porous Si layer is increased by 100%, reaching a maximum value of 33 for the design shown. The first author of the article is a visiting senior researcher at the Institute of Microelectronics (IMEL), National Center for Scientific Research "Demokritos" (Athens, Greece). His research focuses on electromagnetics and microwave engineering, artificial materials and photonic crystals, wireless front ends, antennas and high-frequency analog integrated circuits. [source]


Atypical Fetal Prostate Development is Associated with Ipsilateral Hypoplasia of the Wolffian Ducts in the ACI Rat

THE ANATOMICAL RECORD : ADVANCES IN INTEGRATIVE ANATOMY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY, Issue 5 2010
Luke E. Hofkamp
Serial section reconstruction images of the male ACI rat urogenital sinus shown from a dorso-cranial view. The image in the lower right illustrates the normal late gestation appearance of the accessory gland development, compared to the Wolffian duct ipsilateral abnormality observed in 25% of the male offspring (upper left). See Potok et al., Anatomical Record 239:747,753. [source]


Local axon collaterals of lamina I projection neurons in the spinal cord of young rats

THE JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE NEUROLOGY, Issue 14 2010
Peter Szucs
lpsilateral spinal cord areas occupied by axon collaterals of different types of ALT projection neurons. Dorsal Collateral Type projection neurons (DCT-I and II, upper right and left corners; respectively) send axon collaterals into the dorsal laminae of the same segment and these axons may extend into the overlying white matter. The collateral area of Lateral Collateral Type (LCT) neurons (purple cell, lower left) extends beyond the segment of the neuron, includes the lateral spinal nucleus, a part of the dorsolateral funiculus and may include the lateral part of laminae I-V. Collaterals of Ventral Collateral Type (VCT) neurons (yellow cell, lower right) are occupying an area that could be best described as a transverse slice of the grey matter ventral to lamina IV, centered on the rostrocaudal position of the neuron soma. The Journal of Comparative Neurology, Volume 518, Number 14, pages 2645,2665. [source]