Liberal Education (liberal + education)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


AUGUSTINE ON LIBERAL EDUCATION: DEFENDER AND DEFENSIVE

THE HEYTHROP JOURNAL, Issue 3 2010
RYAN N.S. TOPPING
First page of article [source]


Newman's Theory of a Liberal Education: A Reassessment and its Implications

JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION, Issue 2 2008
D. G. MULCAHY
John Henry Newman provided the basic vocabulary and guiding rationale sustaining the ideal of a liberal education up to our day. He highlighted its central focus on the cultivation of the intellect, its reliance upon broadly based theoretical knowledge, its independence of moral and religious stipulations, and its being its own end. As new interpretations enter the debate on liberal education further educational possibilities emanate from Newman's thought beyond those contained in his theory of a liberal education. These are found in Newman's broader idea of a university education, incorporating social, moral, and spiritual formation and in his philosophical thought where he develops a theory of knowledge at odds with the Idea of a University. There are, in addition, intriguing possibilities that arise from Newman's theory of reasoning in concrete affairs both because of their implicit challenge to inherited theories of a liberal education and because of the educational possibilities they hold out in their own right and in actual educational developments to which they may lend support. [source]


Rhetoric, Paideia and the Old Idea of a Liberal Education

JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION, Issue 2 2007
ALISTAIR MILLER
This paper argues that the modern curriculum of academic subject disciplines embodies a rationalist conception of pure, universal knowledge that does little to cultivate, humanise or form the self. A liberal education in the classical humanist tradition, by contrast, develops a personal culture or paideia, an understanding of the self as a social, political and cultural being, and the practical wisdom needed to make judgements in practical, political and human affairs. The paper concludes by asking whether the old liberal curriculum, traditionally centred on the humanities and the disciplines of grammar and rhetoric, can be recovered in the modern age. [source]


Education: From telos to technique?

EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND THEORY, Issue 2 2008
Anoop Gupta
Abstract A preoccupation with technology has helped bury the philosophical question: What is the point of education? I attempt to answer this question. Various answers to the question are surveyed and it is shown that they depend upon different conceptions of the self. For example, the devotional-self of the 12th century (which was about becoming master of the self) gave way to the liberal-self (which was to facilitate social change). Education can only be satisfactorily justified, I argue, by appeal to transcendent values such as mastery of the self, which is incipient in liberal education. [source]


Foucault, Educational Research and the Issue of Autonomy

EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AND THEORY, Issue 3 2005
Mark Olssen
Abstract This article seeks to demonstrate a particular application of Foucault's philosophical approach to a particular issue in education: that of personal autonomy. The paper surveys and extends the approach taken by James Marshall in his book Michel Foucault: Personal autonomy and education. After surveying Marshall's writing on the issue I extend Marshall's approach, critically analysing the work of Rob Reich and Meira Levinson, two contemporary philosophers who advocate models of personal autonomy as the basis for a liberal education. [source]


Newman's Theory of a Liberal Education: A Reassessment and its Implications

JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION, Issue 2 2008
D. G. MULCAHY
John Henry Newman provided the basic vocabulary and guiding rationale sustaining the ideal of a liberal education up to our day. He highlighted its central focus on the cultivation of the intellect, its reliance upon broadly based theoretical knowledge, its independence of moral and religious stipulations, and its being its own end. As new interpretations enter the debate on liberal education further educational possibilities emanate from Newman's thought beyond those contained in his theory of a liberal education. These are found in Newman's broader idea of a university education, incorporating social, moral, and spiritual formation and in his philosophical thought where he develops a theory of knowledge at odds with the Idea of a University. There are, in addition, intriguing possibilities that arise from Newman's theory of reasoning in concrete affairs both because of their implicit challenge to inherited theories of a liberal education and because of the educational possibilities they hold out in their own right and in actual educational developments to which they may lend support. [source]


Rhetoric, Paideia and the Old Idea of a Liberal Education

JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION, Issue 2 2007
ALISTAIR MILLER
This paper argues that the modern curriculum of academic subject disciplines embodies a rationalist conception of pure, universal knowledge that does little to cultivate, humanise or form the self. A liberal education in the classical humanist tradition, by contrast, develops a personal culture or paideia, an understanding of the self as a social, political and cultural being, and the practical wisdom needed to make judgements in practical, political and human affairs. The paper concludes by asking whether the old liberal curriculum, traditionally centred on the humanities and the disciplines of grammar and rhetoric, can be recovered in the modern age. [source]


Introduction: Bildung and the idea of a liberal education

JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION, Issue 3 2002
Lars LÝvlie
[source]


Alasdair MacIntyre on Education: In Dialogue with Joseph Dunne

JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION, Issue 1 2002
Alasdair Macintyre
This discussion begins from the dilemma, posed in some earlier writing by Alasdair MacIntyre, that education is essential but also, in current economic and cultural conditions, impossible. The potential for resolving this dilemma through appeal to ,practice', ,narrative unity', and ,tradition'(three core concepts in After Virtue and later writings) is then examined. The discussion also explores the relationship of education to the modern state and the power of a liberal education to create an ,educated public' very different in character from the electorates of contemporary democratic regimes. It concludes with some remarks on the role of education in combating prejudice against certain kinds of human difference. [source]


Entrepreneurship as a Liberal Art

POLITICS & POLICY, Issue 2 2008
Henry G. Rennie
This article looks at the role liberal arts colleges or universities can play in developing individuals with a comparative advantage in new enterprise creation. The thesis is that entrepreneurship is a creative act and, as such, has more in common with the liberal arts than the narrower fields of both market economics and business. The article concludes by integrating entrepreneurship, creativity, and liberal arts. It is shown that entrepreneurship can be the foundation of a liberal education because: (1) entrepreneurship will create a distinctive competency and generate increased value added in the liberal arts experience of students; (2) entrepreneurship will promote learning through applications of the consilience of inductions; (3) it will integrate the curriculum, reduce time, and subject compartmentalization of the curriculum; and (4) entrepreneurship will minimize external competitive threats to the liberal arts college. Implications of this conclusion for the curriculum in American colleges are suggested. [source]