Limpopo Province (limpopo + province)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


,Model Tribes' and Iconic Conservationists?

DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE, Issue 1 2008
The Makuleke Restitution Case in Kruger National Park
ABSTRACT This article investigates how the Makuleke community in Limpopo Province achieved iconic status in relation to land reform and community-based conservation discourses in South Africa and beyond. It argues that the situation may be more complex than it first appears, and the ways in which the Makuleke story has been deployed by NGOs, activists, academics, conservationists, the state and business may be too simplistic. The authors discuss historical representations of the Makuleke ,tribe' against the backdrop of their experiences of living in the borderland Pafuri region of the Kruger National Park prior to their forced removal. After investigating the ways in which the chieftaincy, and its relation to communal land, has been strengthened by local mobilizations against threats from the neighbouring Mhinga Tribal Authority, the authors suggest that a central tension in the Makuleke area is the conflict between democratic principles governing the legal entity in control of the land (i.e., the Communal Property Association), and traditionalist patriarchal principles of the Tribal Authority. The article shows how these restitution-linked processes became implicated in the establishment in 2002 of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park. The authors also argue that the image of the Makuleke as a ,model tribe' is both a product of changing historical circumstances and a contributor to contemporary discourses on land restitution and conservation. [source]


FIGHTING FIRE WITH A BROKEN TEACUP: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SOUTH AFRICA'S LAND-REDISTRIBUTION PROGRAM,

GEOGRAPHICAL REVIEW, Issue 3 2008
WILLIAM G. MOSELEY
ABSTRACT. Since the rise of its first democratically elected government in 1994, South Africa has sought to redress its highly inequitable land distribution through a series of land-reform programs. In this study we examine land-redistribution efforts in two of South Africa's provinces, the Western Cape and Limpopo. By analyzing a cross-section of projects in these two locales we develop a political ecology of stymied land-reform possibilities to explain the limited progress to date. Given South Africa's ambitious goal of redistributing 30 percent of its white-owned land by 2014 and the incremental and flawed nature of its redistribution program, we argue that the process is like trying to put out a fire with a broken teacup. Our results are based on interviews with policymakers, commercial farmers, and land-redistribution beneficiaries, as well as on an analysis of land-use change in Limpopo Province. [source]


Exploitation of Encephalartos transvenosus outside and inside Mphaphuli Cycads Nature Reserve, Limpopo Province, South Africa

AFRICAN JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY, Issue 1 2010
A. M. Ravele
Abstract This study has investigated the use and threats of Encephalartos transvenosus outside and inside Mphaphuli Cycads Nature Reserve, Limpopo Province, South Africa. Data were collected from 2005 to 2006 through social and ecological surveys. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 40 people per household, sampled from four selected villages around the reserve. E. transvenosus is used for medicinal purposes, decorations, cultural activities and as food. Youth and adult persons harvest E. transvenosus for income generation, while children and aged people mainly use it for subsistence purposes. The survival of E. transvenosus in the wild is uncertain due to various threats, such as illegal collection, habitat destruction, fire and grazing. Some conservation measures are also discussed. Résumé Cet article rapporte les recherches sur l'utilisation et les menaces sur E. transvenosus en dehors et à l'intérieur de la Mphaphuli Cycads Nature Reserve, dans la Province du Limpopo, en Afrique du Sud. Des données ont été récoltées de 2005 à 2006 via des enquêtes sociales et écologiques. Des interviews semi structurées ont été menées chez un total de 40 personnes, par ménage, pris au hasard dans quatre villages choisis autour de la réserve. E. transvenosus est utiliséà des fins médicinales, pour la décoration, des activités culturelles et l'alimentation. Jeunes et adultes récoltent E. transvenosus pour en tirer des revenus, tandis que les enfants et les vieilles personnes les utilisent beaucoup pour leur subsistance. La survie d'E. transvenosus dans la nature est incertaine en raison de diverses menaces telles que la récolte illégale, la destruction de l'habitat, les feux et le pâturage. Certaines mesures de conservation furent aussi discutées. [source]