Lidocaine Administration (lidocaine + administration)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Intravenous lidocaine for status epilepticus during childhood

DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE & CHILD NEUROLOGY, Issue 3 2006
Shin-ichiro Hamano MD;
The clinical efficacy of lidocaine for convulsive status epilepticus in 53 convulsive episodes was examined in 37 children (17 males, 20 females). Mean age of patients receiving lidocaine was 3 years 7 months (SD 3y 5mo). Lidocaine administration achieved control of status epilepticus in 19 of 53 convulsive episodes (35.8%). Seizures ceased within 5 minutes of lidocaine administration in all 19 patients who were responsive to the drug. Regarding aetiology of status epilepticus and types of seizures, there was no statistical difference in effectiveness. Mild decrease of oxygen saturation, monitored by pulse oximetry, was observed in one patient, which improved by oxygenation using a mask. Lidocaine is a useful anticonvulsive agent; however, the response rate to lidocaine appears to be quite low, as less than half of the seizures were effectively controlled by lidocaine. Favourable properties of the drug include prompt responses, less alteration of consciousness, and fewer adverse effects, including less respiratory depression. [source]


Comparison of cardiovascular function and quality of recovery in isoflurane-anaesthetised horses administered a constant rate infusion of lidocaine or lidocaine and medetomidine during elective surgery

EQUINE VETERINARY JOURNAL, Issue 3 2010
A. VALVERDE
Summary Reasons for performing study: The effects of lidocaine combined with medetomidine or lidocaine alone on cardiovascular function during anaesthesia and their effects on recovery have not been thoroughly investigated in isoflurane-anaesthetised horses. Objectives: To determine the effects of an intraoperative i.v. constant rate infusion of lidocaine combined with medetomidine (Group 1) or lidocaine (Group 2) alone on cardiovascular function and on the quality of recovery in 12 isoflurane-anaesthetised horses undergoing arthroscopy. Hypothesis: The combination would depress cardiovascular function but improve the quality of recovery when compared to lidocaine alone in isoflurane-anaesthetised horses. Methods: Lidocaine (2 mg/kg bwt i.v. bolus followed by 50 g/kg bwt/min i.v.) or lidocaine (same dose) and medetomidine (5 g/kg bwt/h i.v.) was started 30 min after induction of anaesthesia. Lidocaine administration was discontinued 30 min before the end of surgery in both groups, whereas medetomidine administration was continued until the end of surgery. Cardiovascular function and quality of recovery were assessed. Results: Horses in Group 1 had longer recoveries, which were of better quality due to better strength and overall attitude during the recovery phase than those in Group 2. Arterial blood pressure was significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 and this effect was associated with medetomidine. No significant differences in cardiac output, arterial blood gases, electrolytes and acid-base status were detected between the 2 groups. Conclusions and potential relevance: The combination of an intraoperative constant rate infusion of lidocaine and medetomidine did not adversely affect cardiovascular function in isoflurane-anaesthetised horses and improved the quality of recovery when compared to an intraoperative infusion of lidocaine alone. [source]


Effects of intravenous lidocaine overdose on cardiac electrical activity and blood pressure in the horse

EQUINE VETERINARY JOURNAL, Issue 5 2001
G. A. MEYER
Summary This study aimed to identify blood serum lidocaine concentrations in the horse which resulted in clinical signs of intoxication, and to document the effects of toxic levels on the cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary systems. Nineteen clinically normal mature horses of mixed breed, age and sex were observed. Lidocaine administration was initiated in each subject with an i.v. loading dose of 1.5 mg/kg bwt and followed by continuous infusion of 0.3 mg/kg bwt/min until clinical signs of intoxication were observed. Intoxication was defined as the development of skeletal muscle tremors. Prior to administration of lidocaine, blood samples for lidocaine analysis, heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, respiratory rate and electrocardiographic (ECG) data were collected. After recording baseline data, repeat data were collected at 5 min intervals until signs of intoxication were observed. The range of serum lidocaine concentrations at which the clinical signs of intoxication were observed was 1.85,4.53 ,g/ml (mean s.d. 3.24 0.74 ,g/ml). Statistically significant changes in P wave duration, P-R interval, R-R interval and Q-T interval were observed in comparison to control values, as a result of lidocaine administration. These changes in ECG values did not fall outside published normal values and were not clinically significant. Heart rate, blood pressures and respiratory rates were unchanged from control values. This study establishes toxic serum lidocaine levels in the horse, and demonstrates that there were no clinically significant cardiovascular effects with serum lidocaine concentrations less than those required to produce signs of toxicity. [source]


Intravenous lidocaine for status epilepticus during childhood

DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE & CHILD NEUROLOGY, Issue 3 2006
Shin-ichiro Hamano MD;
The clinical efficacy of lidocaine for convulsive status epilepticus in 53 convulsive episodes was examined in 37 children (17 males, 20 females). Mean age of patients receiving lidocaine was 3 years 7 months (SD 3y 5mo). Lidocaine administration achieved control of status epilepticus in 19 of 53 convulsive episodes (35.8%). Seizures ceased within 5 minutes of lidocaine administration in all 19 patients who were responsive to the drug. Regarding aetiology of status epilepticus and types of seizures, there was no statistical difference in effectiveness. Mild decrease of oxygen saturation, monitored by pulse oximetry, was observed in one patient, which improved by oxygenation using a mask. Lidocaine is a useful anticonvulsive agent; however, the response rate to lidocaine appears to be quite low, as less than half of the seizures were effectively controlled by lidocaine. Favourable properties of the drug include prompt responses, less alteration of consciousness, and fewer adverse effects, including less respiratory depression. [source]


Effect of intravenous lidocaine administration on laminar inflammation in the black walnut extract model of laminitis

EQUINE VETERINARY JOURNAL, Issue 3 2010
J. M. WILLIAMS
Summary Reasons for performing study: Laminitis is a serious complication of horses suffering from sepsis/endotoxaemia-related events. Laminitis in horses and organ injury in human sepsis are both reported to involve inflammatory injury to the laminae/organs including early activation of endothelium and leucocytes leading to emigration of neutrophils into the tissue interstitium. In the black walnut extract (BWE) model, systemic inflammatory events coincide with marked increase in laminar mRNA concentrations of inflammatory genes including proinflammatory cytokines (i.e. IL-1,, IL-6), COX-2, chemokines (i.e. IL-8) and endothelial adhesion molecules (i.e. ICAM-1 and E-selectin). In models of human sepsis, i.v. lidocaine has been reported to decrease leucocyte and endothelial activation, and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of i.v. lidocaine therapy on the inflammatory processes documented to occur in the BWE model of laminitis. Methods: Twelve horses were administered BWE and treated immediately with either lidocaine (1.3 mg/kg bwt bolus, followed by 0.05 mg/kg bwt/min CRI, n = 6) or saline (n = 6) for 10 h. At 10 h post BWE administration, laminar samples were obtained under general anaesthesia for assessment of proinflammatory gene expression (using RT-qPCR) and leucocyte emigration (via CD13 immunohistochemistry). At 0, 3 and 10 h post BWE administration, skin samples were obtained for assessment of leucocyte emigration (via calprotectin immunohistochemistry). Results: No significant differences between groups were noted for inflammatory gene mRNA concentrations (IL-1,, IL-6, IL-8, COX-2) or for number of leucocytes present within the laminar interstitium or skin dermis. Increased (P<0.05) laminar E-selectin mRNA concentrations were present in the LD group (vs. SAL group). Conclusions: Continuous administration of i.v. lidocaine does not inhibit inflammatory events in either the laminae or skin in the horse administered black walnut extract. Potential relevance: This work questions the use of continuous i.v. administration of lidocaine as an effective anti-inflammatory therapy for systemic inflammation. [source]


Effects of intravenous lidocaine overdose on cardiac electrical activity and blood pressure in the horse

EQUINE VETERINARY JOURNAL, Issue 5 2001
G. A. MEYER
Summary This study aimed to identify blood serum lidocaine concentrations in the horse which resulted in clinical signs of intoxication, and to document the effects of toxic levels on the cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary systems. Nineteen clinically normal mature horses of mixed breed, age and sex were observed. Lidocaine administration was initiated in each subject with an i.v. loading dose of 1.5 mg/kg bwt and followed by continuous infusion of 0.3 mg/kg bwt/min until clinical signs of intoxication were observed. Intoxication was defined as the development of skeletal muscle tremors. Prior to administration of lidocaine, blood samples for lidocaine analysis, heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, respiratory rate and electrocardiographic (ECG) data were collected. After recording baseline data, repeat data were collected at 5 min intervals until signs of intoxication were observed. The range of serum lidocaine concentrations at which the clinical signs of intoxication were observed was 1.85,4.53 ,g/ml (mean s.d. 3.24 0.74 ,g/ml). Statistically significant changes in P wave duration, P-R interval, R-R interval and Q-T interval were observed in comparison to control values, as a result of lidocaine administration. These changes in ECG values did not fall outside published normal values and were not clinically significant. Heart rate, blood pressures and respiratory rates were unchanged from control values. This study establishes toxic serum lidocaine levels in the horse, and demonstrates that there were no clinically significant cardiovascular effects with serum lidocaine concentrations less than those required to produce signs of toxicity. [source]