Knowledge

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences

Kinds of Knowledge

  • accumulated knowledge
  • accurate knowledge
  • acquired knowledge
  • actionable knowledge
  • adaptation knowledge
  • additional knowledge
  • adequate knowledge
  • anatomical knowledge
  • anthropological knowledge
  • appropriate knowledge
  • author knowledge
  • authoritative knowledge
  • available knowledge
  • background knowledge
  • baseline knowledge
  • basic knowledge
  • best knowledge
  • biological knowledge
  • biomedical knowledge
  • breastfeeding knowledge
  • cancer knowledge
  • carer knowledge
  • causal knowledge
  • children knowledge
  • clear knowledge
  • clinical knowledge
  • collective knowledge
  • common knowledge
  • community knowledge
  • complete knowledge
  • comprehensive knowledge
  • considerable knowledge
  • consumer knowledge
  • content knowledge
  • core knowledge
  • cultural knowledge
  • cumulative knowledge
  • current knowledge
  • customer knowledge
  • deep knowledge
  • deeper knowledge
  • dentist knowledge
  • design knowledge
  • detailed knowledge
  • direct knowledge
  • disciplinary knowledge
  • doctor knowledge
  • domain knowledge
  • ecological knowledge
  • emotion knowledge
  • empirical knowledge
  • employee knowledge
  • environmental knowledge
  • exact knowledge
  • existing knowledge
  • experiential knowledge
  • expert knowledge
  • explicit knowledge
  • extensive knowledge
  • external knowledge
  • factual knowledge
  • financial knowledge
  • firm knowledge
  • fundamental knowledge
  • general knowledge
  • global knowledge
  • good knowledge
  • greater knowledge
  • growing knowledge
  • health knowledge
  • historical knowledge
  • human knowledge
  • imperfect knowledge
  • implicit knowledge
  • important knowledge
  • improved knowledge
  • in-depth knowledge
  • incomplete knowledge
  • increase knowledge
  • increased knowledge
  • increasing knowledge
  • incremental knowledge
  • indigenous knowledge
  • individual knowledge
  • insufficient knowledge
  • integrate knowledge
  • interdisciplinary knowledge
  • intimate knowledge
  • latest knowledge
  • legal knowledge
  • letter knowledge
  • lexical knowledge
  • limited knowledge
  • little knowledge
  • local knowledge
  • management knowledge
  • managing knowledge
  • maternal knowledge
  • mathematical knowledge
  • medical knowledge
  • medical student knowledge
  • moral knowledge
  • mother knowledge
  • necessary knowledge
  • new knowledge
  • nurse knowledge
  • nursing knowledge
  • nutritional knowledge
  • objective knowledge
  • of knowledge
  • only knowledge
  • organizational knowledge
  • our knowledge
  • own knowledge
  • parental knowledge
  • partial knowledge
  • participant knowledge
  • patient knowledge
  • pedagogical content knowledge
  • perceptual knowledge
  • perfect knowledge
  • personal knowledge
  • physician knowledge
  • political knowledge
  • poor knowledge
  • practical knowledge
  • practice knowledge
  • practitioner knowledge
  • precise knowledge
  • present knowledge
  • previous knowledge
  • prior knowledge
  • priori knowledge
  • procedural knowledge
  • process knowledge
  • product knowledge
  • professional knowledge
  • provider knowledge
  • public knowledge
  • quantitative knowledge
  • recent knowledge
  • relevant knowledge
  • research knowledge
  • resident knowledge
  • safety knowledge
  • science knowledge
  • scientific knowledge
  • sexual knowledge
  • shared knowledge
  • sharing knowledge
  • social knowledge
  • sound knowledge
  • spatial knowledge
  • special knowledge
  • specialist knowledge
  • specific knowledge
  • staff knowledge
  • state-of-the-art knowledge
  • statistical knowledge
  • structural knowledge
  • student knowledge
  • student prior knowledge
  • subjective knowledge
  • sufficient knowledge
  • tacit knowledge
  • teacher knowledge
  • technical knowledge
  • technological knowledge
  • theoretical knowledge
  • thorough knowledge
  • traditional knowledge
  • university student knowledge
  • up-to-date knowledge
  • useful knowledge
  • valuable knowledge
  • vocabulary knowledge
  • women knowledge
  • word knowledge

  • Terms modified by Knowledge

  • knowledge access
  • knowledge accumulation
  • knowledge acquisition
  • knowledge application
  • knowledge argument
  • knowledge asset
  • knowledge available
  • knowledge base
  • knowledge boundary
  • knowledge building
  • knowledge capital
  • knowledge claim
  • knowledge community
  • knowledge construction
  • knowledge creation
  • knowledge deficit
  • knowledge development
  • knowledge diffusion
  • knowledge discovery
  • knowledge domain
  • knowledge economy
  • knowledge exchange
  • knowledge exploitation
  • knowledge exploration
  • knowledge gain
  • knowledge gap
  • knowledge generation
  • knowledge grid
  • knowledge integration
  • knowledge item
  • knowledge lead
  • knowledge level
  • knowledge life cycle
  • knowledge management
  • knowledge management activity
  • knowledge management perspective
  • knowledge management process
  • knowledge management system
  • knowledge model
  • knowledge necessary
  • knowledge network
  • knowledge only
  • knowledge organization
  • knowledge perspective
  • knowledge pertaining
  • knowledge process
  • knowledge production
  • knowledge question
  • knowledge questionnaire
  • knowledge relating
  • knowledge relevant
  • knowledge representation
  • knowledge requirement
  • knowledge resource
  • knowledge retention
  • knowledge scale
  • knowledge score
  • knowledge sharing
  • knowledge society
  • knowledge source
  • knowledge spillover
  • knowledge stock
  • knowledge strategy
  • knowledge structure
  • knowledge system
  • knowledge test
  • knowledge transfer
  • knowledge translation
  • knowledge type
  • knowledge utilization
  • knowledge work
  • knowledge worker

  • Selected Abstracts


    THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS AND CRIMINOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE: 2008 PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS TO THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY,

    CRIMINOLOGY, Issue 1 2009
    ROBERT J. BURSIK JR.
    First page of article [source]


    SOMATOTYPING, ANTIMODERNISM, AND THE PRODUCTION OF CRIMINOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE,

    CRIMINOLOGY, Issue 4 2007
    NICOLE RAFTER
    This study analyzes the work of William H. Sheldon, the psychologist, physician, and advocate of the study of body types. It investigates how he arrived at his much-repeated finding that a correlation exists between mesomorphy (a stocky, muscular body build) and delinquency and how his ideas were validated and perpetuated. It reviews what Sheldon actually said about the causes of crime; identifies his goals in searching for a relationship between body shape and criminality; explains how he found audiences for his biological theory at a time when sociological approaches dominated criminology; and attempts to understand the current criminological ambivalence about the scientific status of Sheldon's work, despite its discreditation decades ago. I argue that the tripartite structure of Sheldon's thought attracted three different audiences,methodologists, social scientists, and supporters,and that it encouraged the supporters to fund his research without reference to the critiques of the social scientists. I also argue that somatotyping was part of a broader antimodernist reaction within international scientific communities against the dislocations of twentieth-century life. To understand the origins, acceptance, and maintenance of criminological ideas, we need a historical perspective on figures of the past. Positivism may inform us about what is true and false, but we also need to know how truth and falsity have been constructed over time and how the ideas of earlier criminologists were shaped by their personal and social contexts. [source]


    PROTECTING THE INTEGRITY OF SHARED SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE: IS THE CONFLICT OF INTEREST STATEMENT ENOUGH?

    ADDICTION, Issue 2 2010
    TANYA CHIKRITZHS
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    RULES, TECHNIQUE, AND PRACTICAL KNOWLEDGE: A WITTGENSTEINIAN EXPLORATION OF VOCATIONAL LEARNING

    EDUCATIONAL THEORY, Issue 4 2006
    Christopher WinchArticle first published online: 30 NOV 200
    He argues that most rule-following is only successful when it involves a degree of flexibility. For instance, most technical work that involves rule-following requires flexibility and situational awareness for success. Technical education that fails to take account of the need to apply rules in a way that accounts for a wide variety of situations is likely to be unsuccessful. Winch offers an account of professional judgment based on Stephen Toulmin's theory of argumentation and discusses progression from novice to expert in terms of Toulmin's analysis. He also considers the relation between vocational education and other practices in the context of the wider civic implications of occupational practice. [source]


    THICKENING THE DISCUSSION: INSPECTING CONSTRUCTIVIST THEORIES OF KNOWLEDGE THROUGH A JAMESIAN LENS

    EDUCATIONAL THEORY, Issue 1 2002
    Bradford S. Woods
    First page of article [source]


    [Commentary] THE IMPORTANCE OF REACHING A CONSENSUAL DEFINITION OF DEPENDENCE AND OF COMMUNICATING THIS KNOWLEDGE TO THE PUBLIC

    ADDICTION, Issue 7 2008
    JEAN-FRANÇOIS ETTER
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    THE IMPACT OF CONTINUING EDUCATION TRAINING ON LAW GUARDIAN KNOWLEDGE, EFFICACY, AND PRACTICE BEHAVIORS

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 1 2007
    Wendi Cross
    There is an increased demand for law guardians in domestic violence cases, especially those involving child witnesses. Training is required for law guardians to meet child clients' needs. While workshops and conferences are typical venues for continuing education training, their effectiveness is unknown. This pilot study compared law guardians who attended a conference on community violence and children to nonattendees on several training outcomes. Results showed a positive impact on attendees' feelings of efficacy and intentions to carry out new practice behaviors post-conference; differences were maintained at follow-up. Limitations and implications of this pilot study are discussed. [source]


    THE FLUCTUATIONS OF ITALIAN GLACIERS DURING THE LAST CENTURY: A CONTRIBUTION TO KNOWLEDGE ABOUT ALPINE GLACIER CHANGES

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES A: PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY, Issue 3 2007
    MICHELE CITTERIO
    ABSTRACT. This paper describes the recent evolution of Italian glaciers through an analysis of all available terminus fluctuation data that the authors have entered in a glaciers database (named GLAD) containing 883 records collected on glaciers from 1908 to 2002. Furthermore, a representative subset of data (249 glaciers located in Lombardy) was analysed regarding surface area changes. For the analysis of terminus fluctuations, the glaciers were sorted by size classes according to length. The data showed that during the 20th century Italian Alpine glaciers underwent a generalized retreat, with one distinct and well documented readvance episode that occurred between the 1970s and mid-1980s, and a poorly documented one around the early 1920s. The rates of terminus advance and retreat have changed without significant delays for the larger glaciers with respect to the smaller ones. However, the smaller the glacier, the more limited the advance (if any) during the 1970s and early 1980s. The behaviour of glaciers shorter than 1 km appears to have changed in the last decade, and between 1993 and 2002 they retreated at a very high rate. The analysis of the subset of data led to a quanti-fication of surface reduction of c. 10% from 1992 to 1999 for glaciers in Lombardy. Small glaciers proved to contribute strongly to total area loss: in 1999, 232 glaciers (c. 90% of the total) were smaller than 1 km2, covering 27.2 km2 (less than 30% of the total area), but accounted for 58% of the total loss in area (they had lost 7.4 km2). [source]


    COLLINGWOOD, BRADLEY, AND HISTORICAL KNOWLEDGE

    HISTORY AND THEORY, Issue 2 2006
    ROBERT M. BURNS
    ABSTRACT The central feature of the narrative structure of Collingwood's The Idea of History (IH) is the pivotal role accorded to Bradley, evident in the table of contents and in the two discussions of him. Few readers have noticed that, confusingly, the book's first discussion of Bradley (on pages 134-141) is a revision of the (1935) Inaugural Lecture "The Historical Imagination," which constitutes the book's second discussion of Bradley (on pages 231-249). The differences between these two presentations of Bradley are significant. The 1935 account (presented in IH on pages 231-249) seeks to portray the Bradley of the Presuppositions of Critical History as a Copernican revolutionary in historical thought, even though the neo-Kantian transcendentalism promoted in the Lecture had been the core of Collingwood's approach to philosophy of history from the mid-1920s, many years before he encountered Bradley's essay. By 1935 this transcendentalism was in the process of self-destructing because of inner contradictions. By 1936, once Collingwood's narrative and his criticisms of Bradley left the 1935 claims unsustainable, Collingwood shifted attention to Bradley's later works, in an unsuccessful attempt to sustain the notion of his originality (presented in IH on pages 134-141). Hitherto neglected Collingwood manuscripts held in the Bodleian prove that by 1940 Collingwood recognized this, so that the prominence Knox gave to Bradley in his editing of the IH is demonstrably not in accord with Collingwood's views and plans for The Idea of History. Knox's much-disputed claim that there was a radical shift to historicism in the later Collingwood is, however, confirmed, clear proof being adduced that in the later 1930s the attempt transcendentally to deduce universal and necessary presuppositions of historical knowledge is abandoned for a radically historicist account, paralleled by a demotion of "critical history" as the final form of "history proper" in favor of "scientific history." [source]


    WOMEN AND RELIGION IN THE AFRICAN DIASPORA: KNOWLEDGE, POWER, AND PERFORMANCE edited by R. Marie Griffith and Barbara Dianne Savage

    JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF RELIGION, Issue 1 2009
    STEPHEN D. GLAZIER
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    MODERN CONFUCIAN SYNTHESIS OF QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE KNOWLEDGE: XIONG SHILI ???

    JOURNAL OF CHINESE PHILOSOPHY, Issue 3 2009
    JANA S. RO
    First page of article [source]


    FOOD SAFETY KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDE OF CONSUMERS OF VARIOUS FOOD SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS

    JOURNAL OF FOOD SAFETY, Issue 3 2009
    R. GURUDASANI
    ABSTRACT In the present study, food safety knowledge and attitude of 300 consumers from nine different categories of food service establishments (FSEs) were assessed. Results revealed that most consumers (60%) eating at various FSEs were young, in the age group of 18,35 years. Some of the consumers could identify the carriers for foodborne diseases such as cholera, food poisoning and jaundice, but most of them did not know about the carriers of typhoid, gastroenteritis and amebiosis. Most of the consumers received information on food safety from family and friends. A positive association was seen between education of consumers and frequency of receiving information from various sources such as magazines, TV/radio, posters/hoardings, newspapers, school/colleges, health workers and family/friends. Most consumers had a positive attitude toward food hygiene, and they believed in punishing street food vendors who violated the food safety norms. Most consumers believed that government intervention would help in improving the quality of street foods. A lot of better-educated food handlers believed that adherence to norms on the personal hygiene of the food handler should be made compulsory, and that training of persons in street food service is essential to ensure quality of food and food safety. In conclusion, various sources of information should be used to increase consumer awareness on food safety. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS In the present study, situational analysis was conducted to obtain data on food safety knowledge and attitude of consumers. Results indicated that although some of the consumers could identify the carriers for foodborne diseases, such as cholera, food poisoning and jaundice, most of them did not know about the carriers of typhoid, gastroenteritis and amebiosis. Thus, efforts should be made to educate consumers about the relation between food and diseases and the importance of making proper food choices for consumption. Most consumers had a positive attitude toward food safety and believed government intervention would help in improving the quality of street foods. Such data can form the basis for seeking the attention of government to undertake measures to improve the quality of foods served at various food outlets. Also, it was found that very few consumers received information on food safety from various sources like magazines, TV/radio, posters, newspapers, health workers, nongovernment organizations, etc. This calls for attention of food safety educators to use a variety of audio-visual aids to spread the messages on food safety. Such area-specific data on consumers' knowledge on food safety can assist in developing food safety education programs. [source]


    NURSES' KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICE OF VASCULAR ACCESS INFECTION CONTROL IN HAEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS IN THE REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

    JOURNAL OF RENAL CARE, Issue 2 2008
    DipNS, Margaret Higgins RN
    SUMMARY Vascular access hygiene is an integral component of haemodialysis care. Ensuring nurses possess sufficient knowledge and utilise recommended guidelines on infection control is essential for safe practice and patient safety. The study aimed to investigate nurses' knowledge and practice of vascular access infection control among adult haemodialysis patients in the Republic of Ireland. A confidential self-completion questionnaire was sent to all 190 qualified nurses employed in nine haemodialysis units in the Republic of Ireland, which assessed knowledge and behaviour in infection control. Although 92% of respondents reported that policies had been developed by their units and 47% had received infection control education in the previous year, knowledge and adherence to best practice demonstrated significant scope for improvement. The study recommended the development of standard guidelines and regular reviews and updates of policies. Systems should also be developed to ensure a high level of compliance. [source]


    PHYSICAL DISTRIBUTION AND CHANNEL MANAGEMENT: A KNOWLEDGE AND CAPABILITIES PERSPECTIVE,

    JOURNAL OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2009
    GARY L. FRAZIERArticle first published online: 25 MAR 200
    This paper examines the interrelationship between physical distribution and channel management. A conceptual framework is developed, based on industry and firm conditions, to explain the relative importance of physical distribution functions in the field of channel management. The need for knowledge transfer and integration among channel members to enable organizational capabilities lies at the heart of the research approach. [source]


    THE VALUE OF KNOWLEDGE AND THE PURSUIT OF SURVIVAL

    METAPHILOSOPHY, Issue 3 2010
    SHERRILYN ROUSH
    Abstract: Knowledge requires more than mere true belief, and we also tend to think it is more valuable. I explain the added value that knowledge contributes if its extra ingredient beyond true belief is tracking. I show that the tracking conditions are the unique conditions on knowledge that achieve for those who fulfill them a strict Nash Equilibrium and an Evolutionarily Stable Strategy in what I call the True Belief Game. The added value of these properties, intuitively, includes preparedness and an expectation of survival advantage. On this view knowledge is valuable not because knowledge persists but because it makes the bearer more likely to maintain an appropriate belief state,possibly nonbelief,through time and changing circumstances. When Socrates concluded that knowledge of the road to Larissa was no more valuable than true belief for the purpose of getting to Larissa, he did not take into account that one might want to be prepared for a possible meeting with a misleading sophist along the way, or for the possibility of road work. [source]


    SOSA ON EPISTEMIC CIRCULARITY AND REFLECTIVE KNOWLEDGE

    METAPHILOSOPHY, Issue 2 2009
    NOAH LEMOS
    Abstract: Ernest Sosa has done important work on epistemic circularity, epistemic virtue, and reflective knowledge. He holds that epistemic circularity need not be vicious and need not prevent us from knowing that our ways of forming beliefs are reliable. In this article, I briefly explore Sosa's defense of this view and raise some questions about what is required for reflective knowledge. [source]


    THE PUZZLE OF FALLIBLE KNOWLEDGE

    METAPHILOSOPHY, Issue 3 2008
    HAMID VAHID
    Abstract: Although the fallible/infallible distinction in the theory of knowledge has traditionally been upheld by most epistemologists, almost all contemporary theories of knowledge claim to be fallibilist. Fallibilists have, however, been forced to accommodate knowledge of necessary truths. This has proved to be a daunting task, not least because there is as yet no consensus on how the fallible/infallible divide is to be understood. In this article, after examining and rejecting a number of representative accounts of the notion of fallible knowledge, I argue that the main problems with these accounts actually stem from the very coherence of that notion. I then claim that the distinction is best understood in terms of the externalist/internalist conceptions of knowledge. Finally, I seek to garner some independent support for the proposal by highlighting some of its consequences, including its surprising bearing on certain recent and seemingly distant controversies involving issues in epistemology and philosophy of mind. [source]


    BEALER ON THE AUTONOMY OF PHILOSOPHICAL AND SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE

    METAPHILOSOPHY, Issue 1 2007
    MICHAEL J. SHAFFER
    Abstract: In a series of influential articles, George Bealer argues for the autonomy of philosophical knowledge on the basis that philosophically known truths must be necessary truths. The main point of his argument is that the truths investigated by the sciences are contingent truths to be discovered a posteriori by observation, while the truths of philosophy are necessary truths to be discovered a priori by intuition. The project of assimilating philosophy to the sciences is supposed to be rendered illegitimate by the more or less sharp distinction in these characteristic methods and its modal basis. In this article Bealer's particular way of drawing the distinction between philosophy and science is challenged in a novel manner, and thereby philosophical naturalism is further defended. [source]


    ASSOCIATIONIST LEARNING AS A BASIS OF KNOWLEDGE IN INFANCY

    MONOGRAPHS OF THE SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 1 2008
    Lisa M. Oakes
    First page of article [source]


    I. LEVELS OF HUMAN BODY KNOWLEDGE IN DEVELOPMENT

    MONOGRAPHS OF THE SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 2 2004
    Article first published online: 12 AUG 200
    First page of article [source]


    III,Are There Any Conceptual Truths About Knowledge?

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE ARISTOTELIAN SOCIETY (HARDBACK), Issue 1part1 2008
    Finn SpicerArticle first published online: 26 MAR 200
    In this paper I investigate the nature of the concept knowledge. I ask how this concept must be if it is to generate conceptual truths about knowledge, arguing that it must have a set of principles attached to it (a folk theory) that plays a reference-determining role. I then produce evidence that suggests that the folk theory attached to our concept KNOWLEDGE,our folk epistemology,is inconsistent. If folk epistemology is inconsistent, I conclude, then either there are no conceptual truths about knowledge or any conceptual truths there are will not be a priori knowable. [source]


    CORTICAL DYNAMICS FOR VISUAL KNOWLEDGE ABOUT OBJECTS: WHERE VISION MEETS MEMORY

    PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 2007
    Article first published online: 14 AUG 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    A PERSPECTIVAL DEFINITION OF KNOWLEDGE

    RATIO, Issue 2 2010
    Claudio F. Costa
    In this paper an improved formulation of the classical tripartite view of knowledge is proposed and defended. This formulation solves Gettier's problem by making explicit what is concealed by the symbolic version of the tripartite definition, namely, the perspectival context in which concrete knowledge claims are evaluated. [source]


    ON WILLIAMSON'S ARGUMENTS THAT KNOWLEDGE IS A MENTAL STATE

    RATIO, Issue 2 2005
    Adam Leite
    In Knowledge and Its Limits, Timothy Williamson argues that knowledge is a purely mental state, that is, that it is never a complex state or condition comprising mental factors and non-mental, environmental factors. Three of his arguments are evaluated: arguments from (1) the non-analyzability of the concept of knowledge, (2) the ,primeness' of knowledge, and (3) the (alleged) inability to satisfactorily specify the ,internal' element involved in knowledge. None of these arguments succeeds. Moreover, consideration of the third argument points the way to a cogent argument that knowledge is not a purely mental state. [source]


    PROPERTY AS LEGAL KNOWLEDGE: MEANS AND ENDS

    THE JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE, Issue 4 2004
    Annelise Riles
    This article takes anthropologists' renewed interest in property theory as an opportunity to consider legal theory-making as an ethnographic subject in its own right. My focus is on one particular construct , the instrument, or relation of means to ends, that animates both legal and anthropological theories about property. An analysis of the workings of this construct leads to the conclusion that rather than critique the ends of legal knowledge, the anthropology of property should devote itself to articulating its own means. [source]


    THE VICE OF SNOBBERY: AESTHETIC KNOWLEDGE, JUSTIFICATION AND VIRTUE IN ART APPRECIATION

    THE PHILOSOPHICAL QUARTERLY, Issue 239 2010
    Matthew Kieran
    Apparently snobbery undermines justification for and legitimacy of aesthetic claims. It is also pervasive in the aesthetic realm, much more so than we tend to presume. If these two claims are combined, a fundamental problem arises: we do not know whether or not we are justified in believing or making aesthetic claims. Addressing this new challenge requires an epistemological story which underpins when, where and why snobbish judgement is problematic, and how appreciative claims can survive. This leads towards a virtue-theoretic account of art appreciation and aesthetic justification, as contrasted with a purely reliabilist one , a new direction for contemporary aesthetics. [source]


    LOGICAL KNOWLEDGE AND GETTIER CASES

    THE PHILOSOPHICAL QUARTERLY, Issue 234 2009
    Corine Besson
    Knowledge of the basic rules of logic is often thought to be distinctive, for it seems to be a case of non-inferential a priori knowledge. Many philosophers take its source to be different from those of other types of knowledge, such as knowledge of empirical facts. The most prominent account of knowledge of the basic rules of logic takes this source to be the understanding of logical expressions or concepts. On this account, what explains why such knowledge is distinctive is that it is grounded in semantic or conceptual understanding. However, I show that this cannot be the correct account of knowledge of the basic rules of logic, because it is open to Gettier-style counter-examples. [source]


    SOLVING THE PROBLEM OF EASY KNOWLEDGE

    THE PHILOSOPHICAL QUARTERLY, Issue 233 2008
    Tim Black
    Stewart Cohen argues that several epistemological theories fall victim to the problem of easy knowledge: they allow us to know far too easily that certain sceptical hypotheses are false and that how things seem is a reliable indicator of how they are. This problem is a result of the theories' interaction with an epistemic closure principle. Cohen suggests that the theories should be modified. I argue that attempts to solve the problem should focus on closure instead; a new and plausible epistemic closure principle can solve the problem of easy knowledge. My solution offers a uniform and more successful response to different versions of the problem of easy knowledge. [source]


    KNOWLEDGE, SPEAKER AND SUBJECT

    THE PHILOSOPHICAL QUARTERLY, Issue 219 2005
    Stewart Cohen
    I contrast two solutions to the lottery paradox concerning knowledge: contextualism and subject-sensitive invariantism. I defend contextualism against an objection that it cannot explain how ,knows' and its cognates function inside propositional attitude reports. I then argue that subject-sensitive invariantism fails to provide a satisfactory resolution of the paradox. [source]


    ANTI-INDIVIDUALISM: MIND AND LANGUAGE, KNOWLEDGE AND JUSTIFICATION

    ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY, Issue 2 2009
    CHRISTOPHER S. HILL
    First page of article [source]