International Thought (international + thought)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Power Politics and Appeasement: Political Realism in British International Thought, c. 1935,19551

BRITISH JOURNAL OF POLITICS & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, Issue 2 2006
Ian Hall
It has been argued that the failure of ,realist' international thought to take root in Britain in the aftermath of the Second World War, as it did in the United States, was a function of declining power. This article challenges this view, suggesting instead that for the British, the term ,realism' had been discredited, in the late 1930s, by its associations with appeasement and the ,power politics' of the dictators. Examining the international thought of politicians and scholars in the years before, during and after the war, this article offers a reinterpretation of the British rejection of political realism. [source]


The Forgotten Prophet: Tom Paine's Cosmopolitanism and International Relations

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2000
Thomas C. Walker
The recent questions about the viability of political realism highlight a need for alternative theoretical frameworks to guide international relations research. These alternatives, however, have been slow to emerge, due in part to the field's traditional neglect of political theory. In this essay I present an alternative based on a survey of Paine's international thought. Sir Michael Howard referred to Paine as the most important internationalist writer of all time, but his contributions have been largely ignored by students of international relations. Paine was a classic second image theorist who first posited how democratic governance would promote a peaceful world. Paine's works leave us with all the features of cosmopolitan thinking in international relations: Faith in reason and progress, the evils of authoritarian regimes, the democratic peace, the peaceful effect of trade, nonprovocative defense policies, open diplomacy, obsolescence of conquest, the universal respect for human rights, and the democratic propensity to engage in messianic interventionism. I conclude with a comparison of Kant and Paine where I argue that Paine is the more faithful representative of the Enlightenment for students of international relations. [source]


Power Politics and Appeasement: Political Realism in British International Thought, c. 1935,19551

BRITISH JOURNAL OF POLITICS & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, Issue 2 2006
Ian Hall
It has been argued that the failure of ,realist' international thought to take root in Britain in the aftermath of the Second World War, as it did in the United States, was a function of declining power. This article challenges this view, suggesting instead that for the British, the term ,realism' had been discredited, in the late 1930s, by its associations with appeasement and the ,power politics' of the dictators. Examining the international thought of politicians and scholars in the years before, during and after the war, this article offers a reinterpretation of the British rejection of political realism. [source]