Intelligence Agency (intelligence + agency)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The Effect of International Terrorism on EU Intelligence Co-operation

JCMS: JOURNAL OF COMMON MARKET STUDIES, Issue 1 2008
BJÍRN M▄LLER-WILLE
While the US has revamped its intelligence community by creating the Department of Homeland Security, little seems to have happened at the European level. The article seeks to explain why some intelligence co-operation takes place within the EU and why the bulk does not. It uses a new model, the ,intelligence cube', to develop a discussion on co-operation in distinct areas. Following a functionalist approach, suggesting that collaboration is utility driven, it proposes that efficiency considerations offer the most convincing explanation why no new European Intelligence Agency has been created and why so little co-operation takes place within EU structures. [source]


Bioterrorism: Introduction and Major Agents

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NURSE PRACTITIONERS, Issue 11 2001
Charles Kemp FNP
It is not if, but where and when. In light of the September 11 World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks, biological terrorist acts in the United States seem more likely than ever before. We know there are people willing to die to kill Americans and we know that nations with a history of supporting terrorism have biological warfare (BW) capability. Some of the states capable of BW include Iraq, Libya, Syria, and Iran,all of which have close ties to transnational terrorist groups such as Al-Qaeda, Armed Islamic Group of Algeria, and Al-Jihad of Egypt (Davis, 1999; McGovern, Christopher, & Eitzen, 1999; Sanger, & Kahn, 2001). The threat is not limited to these nations or groups, but all do present a clear danger. According to the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency, operatives of Al-Qaeda (the Osama bin Laden group) "have trained to conduct attacks with toxic chemicals or biological toxins" (Broad, & Peterson, 2001). [source]


The Law: The CIA Leak Case Indicting Vice President Cheney's Chief of Staff

PRESIDENTIAL STUDIES QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2006
LOUIS KLAREVAS
In June 2003, citing "two senior administration officials," syndicated columnist Robert Novak openly identified Valerie Plame as a Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) "operative." As it can be a felony under the Intelligence Identities Protection Act of 1982 to knowingly identify a covert agent of the United States, a grand jury was impaneled to investigate whether or not any Bush administration officials had actually broken the law by outing Plame. After a nearly two-year-long investigation, the grand jury returned an indictment against Vice President Dick Cheney's former Chief of Staff I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, charging him with the ancillary crimes of making false statements, perjury, and obstruction of justice. No one, however, has yet been charged with the underlying crime of leaking the classified identity of a CIA agent. This article explains why indictments have been issued for alleged cover-up crimes, while no one, to date, has been indicted for outing an intelligence operative. After a brief review of the story behind the leak and an overview of the five-count indictment, the article analyzes the Intelligence Identities Protection Act and the related Espionage Act, focusing on why no one has yet been indicted for violating these laws. The article concludes with a cautionary note on why this case is not necessarily over,and why it is even possible, although unlikely, that Bush administration officials might be indicted under the Espionage Act. [source]


George Tenet and the Last Great Days of the CIA

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW, Issue 3 2008
Richard D. White Jr.
George Tenet served as director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 1997 to 2004, an intense period spanning the administrations of Bill Clinton and George W. Bush and covering the terrorist attacks of September 11 and the U.S. invasion of Iraq. Few other central intelligence directors have served for so long, so energetically, or amid so much controversy. This profile examines the steep trajectory of Tenet's career, his response to the al-Qaeda threat, the role he played during the invasion of Iraq, and the eventual reorganization of the nation's intelligence community. It describes a public servant caught between the warring factions of the White House decision-making process, his own agency's intelligence priorities, and, ultimately, his own conscience. [source]