Information Retrieval Systems (information + retrieval_system)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Tuning the matching function for a threshold weighting semantics in a linguistic information retrieval system

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS, Issue 9 2005
E. Herrera-Viedma
Information retrieval is an activity that attempts to produce documents that better fulfill user information needs. To achieve this activity an information retrieval system uses matching functions that specify the degree of relevance of a document with respect to a user query. Assuming linguistic-weighted queries we present a new linguistic matching function for a threshold weighting semantics that is defined using a 2-tuple fuzzy linguistic approach (Herrera F, Martínez L. IEEE Trans Fuzzy Syst 2000;8:746,752). This new 2-tuple linguistic matching function can be interpreted as a tuning of that defined in "Modelling the Retrieval Process for an Information Retrieval System Using an Ordinal Fuzzy Linguistic Approach" (Herrera-Viedma E. J Am Soc Inform Sci Technol 2001;52:460,475). We show that it simplifies the processes of computing in the retrieval activity, avoids the loss of precision in final results, and, consequently, can help to improve the users' satisfaction. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Int Syst 20: 921,937, 2005. [source]


Mooers' law: In and out of context

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 8 2001
Brice Austin
Mooers' Law, widely referenced in the literature of Library and Information Science, has generally been misinterpreted as concluding that customers will tend not to use Information Retrieval systems that are too difficult or frustrating, when in fact the law addresses the reluctance of customers to use any type of IR system, regardless of its faults or merits, within an environment in which having information requires more effort than not having it. An expansion of Mooers' original law is proposed, based upon a "Scale of Information Retrieval Environments," which includes not only those types of environments addressed by Mooers, but those in which a premium is placed upon having information, as well as those in which the effort required from having information vs. not having it is fairly evenly balanced. [source]


An information retrieval system for telephone dialogue in load dispatch center

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING IN JAPAN, Issue 3 2008
Osamu Segawa
Abstract We have developed an information retrieval system for telephone dialogue in a load dispatch center. In load dispatching operations, the needs for recording and information retrieval of a telephone dialogue are high. The proposed system gives a solution for the task and realizes an information retrieval function with any keywords. The effectiveness of the system is verified by telephone dialogue transcription and information retrieval experiments. With 30 telephone dialogues in a load dispatch center, we obtain 59.5% in average word correct and 44.4% in average word accuracy. In the information retrieval experiment, with 20 keywords, we obtain 87.3% in average precision and 67.2% in average recall. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Electr Eng Jpn, 162(3): 44, 50, 2008; Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/eej.20402 [source]


A model of an information retrieval system with unbalanced fuzzy linguistic information

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS, Issue 11 2007
Enrique Herrera-Viedma
Most information retrieval systems based on linguistic approaches use symmetrically and uniformly distributed linguistic term sets to express the weights of queries and the relevance degrees of documents. However, to improve the system,user interaction, it seems more adequate to express these linguistic weights and degrees by means of unbalanced linguistic scales, that is, linguistic term sets with different discrimination levels on both sides of the middle linguistic term. In this contribution we present an information retrieval system that accepts weighted queries whose weights are expressed using unbalanced linguistic term sets. Then, the system provides the retrieved documents classified in linguistic relevance classes assessed on unbalanced linguistic term sets. To do so, we propose a methodology to manage unbalanced linguistic information and we use the linguistic 2-tuple model as the representation base of the unbalanced linguistic information. Additionally, the linguistic 2-tuple model allows us to increase the number of relevance classes in the output and also to improve the performance of the information retrieval system. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Int Syst 22: 1197,1214, 2007. [source]


Tuning the matching function for a threshold weighting semantics in a linguistic information retrieval system

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS, Issue 9 2005
E. Herrera-Viedma
Information retrieval is an activity that attempts to produce documents that better fulfill user information needs. To achieve this activity an information retrieval system uses matching functions that specify the degree of relevance of a document with respect to a user query. Assuming linguistic-weighted queries we present a new linguistic matching function for a threshold weighting semantics that is defined using a 2-tuple fuzzy linguistic approach (Herrera F, Martínez L. IEEE Trans Fuzzy Syst 2000;8:746,752). This new 2-tuple linguistic matching function can be interpreted as a tuning of that defined in "Modelling the Retrieval Process for an Information Retrieval System Using an Ordinal Fuzzy Linguistic Approach" (Herrera-Viedma E. J Am Soc Inform Sci Technol 2001;52:460,475). We show that it simplifies the processes of computing in the retrieval activity, avoids the loss of precision in final results, and, consequently, can help to improve the users' satisfaction. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Int Syst 20: 921,937, 2005. [source]


Relevance: A review of the literature and a framework for thinking on the notion in information science.

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 13 2007
Part II: nature, manifestations of relevance
Relevant: Having significant and demonstrable bearing on the matter at hand., Relevance: The ability as of an information retrieval system to retrieve material that satisfies the needs of the user. ,Merriam-Webster Dictionary 2005 Relevance is a, if not even the, key notion in information science in general and information retrieval in particular. This two-part critical review traces and synthesizes the scholarship on relevance over the past 30 years and provides an updated framework within which the still widely dissonant ideas and works about relevance might be interpreted and related. It is a continuation and update of a similar review that appeared in 1975 under the same title, considered here as being Part I. The present review is organized into two parts: Part II addresses the questions related to nature and manifestations of relevance, and Part III addresses questions related to relevance behavior and effects. In Part II, the nature of relevance is discussed in terms of meaning ascribed to relevance, theories used or proposed, and models that have been developed. The manifestations of relevance are classified as to several kinds of relevance that form an interdependent system of relevances. In Part III, relevance behavior and effects are synthesized using experimental and observational works that incorporate data. In both parts, each section concludes with a summary that in effect provides an interpretation and synthesis of contemporary thinking on the topic treated or suggests hypotheses for future research. Analyses of some of the major trends that shape relevance work are offered in conclusions. [source]


An overview of 45 published database resources for complementary and alternative medicine

HEALTH INFORMATION & LIBRARIES JOURNAL, Issue 2 2010
Katja Boehm
Background:, Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has succeeded to implement itself in the academic context of universities. In order to get information on CAM, clinicians, researchers and healthcare professionals as well as the lay public are increasingly turning to online portals and databases, which disseminate relevant resources. One specific type of online information retrieval systems, namely the database, is being reviewed in this article. Question:, This overview aims at systematically retrieving and describing all databases covering the field of CAM. One of the requirements for inclusion was that the database would also have to be published in a medical journal. Data sources:, The databases amed, CAMbase, embase, and medline/PubMed were searched between December 2008 and December 2009 for publications relevant to CAM databases. The authors' specialist library was also searched for grey literature to be included. Study selection:, All included databases were then visited online and information on the context, structure and volume of the database was extracted. Main results:, Forty-five databases were included in this overview. Databases covered herbal therapies (n = 11), traditional Chinese medicine (n = 9) and some dealt with a vast number of CAM modalities (n = 9), amongst others. The amount of time the databases had been in existence ranged from 4 to 53 years. Countries of origin included the USA (n = 14), UK (n = 7) and Germany (n = 6), amongst others. The main language in 42 of 45 databases was English. Conclusions:, Although this overview is quite comprehensive with respect to the field of CAM, certain CAM practices such as chiropractic, massage, reflexology, meditation or yoga may not have been covered adequately. A more detailed assessment of the quality of the included databases might give additional insights into the listed resources. The creation of a personalised meta-search engine is suggested, towards which this overview could be seen as a first step. [source]


A model of an information retrieval system with unbalanced fuzzy linguistic information

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS, Issue 11 2007
Enrique Herrera-Viedma
Most information retrieval systems based on linguistic approaches use symmetrically and uniformly distributed linguistic term sets to express the weights of queries and the relevance degrees of documents. However, to improve the system,user interaction, it seems more adequate to express these linguistic weights and degrees by means of unbalanced linguistic scales, that is, linguistic term sets with different discrimination levels on both sides of the middle linguistic term. In this contribution we present an information retrieval system that accepts weighted queries whose weights are expressed using unbalanced linguistic term sets. Then, the system provides the retrieved documents classified in linguistic relevance classes assessed on unbalanced linguistic term sets. To do so, we propose a methodology to manage unbalanced linguistic information and we use the linguistic 2-tuple model as the representation base of the unbalanced linguistic information. Additionally, the linguistic 2-tuple model allows us to increase the number of relevance classes in the output and also to improve the performance of the information retrieval system. © 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Int Syst 22: 1197,1214, 2007. [source]


Effects of granularity of search results on the relevance judgment behavior of engineers: Building systems for retrieval and understanding of context

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 3 2010
Panos Balatsoukas
Granularity is a novel concept for presenting information in search result interfaces of hierarchical query-driven information retrieval systems in a manner that can support understanding and exploration of the context of the retrieved information (e.g., by highlighting its position in the granular hierarchy and exposing its relationship with relatives in the hierarchy). Little research, however, has been conducted on the effects of granularity of search results on the relevance judgment behavior of engineers. Engineers are highly motivated information users who are particularly interested in understanding the context of the retrieved information. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the design of systems with careful regard for granularity would improve engineers' relevance judgment behavior. To test this hypothesis, a prototype system was developed and evaluated in terms of the time needed for users to find relevant information, the accuracy of their relevance judgment, and their subjective satisfaction. To evaluate the prototype, a user study was conducted where participants were asked to complete tasks, complete a satisfaction questionnaire, and be interviewed. The findings showed that participants performed better and were more satisfied when the prototype system presented only relevant information in context. Although this study presents some novel findings about the effects of granularity and context on user relevance judgment behavior, the results should be interpreted with caution. For example, participants in this research were recruited by convenience and performed a set of simulated tasks as opposed to real ones. However, suggestions for further research are presented. [source]


Building a reusable test collection for question answering

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 7 2006
Jimmy Lin
In contrast to traditional information retrieval systems, which return ranked lists of documents that users must manually browse through, a question answering system attempts to directly answer natural language questions posed by the user. Although such systems possess language-processing capabilities, they still rely on traditional document retrieval techniques to generate an initial candidate set of documents. In this article, the authors argue that document retrieval for question answering represents a task different from retrieving documents in response to more general retrospective information needs. Thus, to guide future system development, specialized question answering test collections must be constructed. They show that the current evaluation resources have major shortcomings; to remedy the situation, they have manually created a small, reusable question answering test collection for research purposes. In this article they describe their methodology for building this test collection and discuss issues they encountered regarding the notion of "answer correctness." [source]


A comprehensive and systematic model of user evaluation of Web search engines: I. Theory and background,

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 13 2003
Louise T. Su
The project proposes and tests a comprehensive and systematic model of user evaluation of Web search engines. The project contains two parts. Part I describes the background and the model including a set of criteria and measures, and a method for implementation. It includes a literature review for two periods. The early period (1995,1996) portrays the settings for developing the model and the later period (1997,2000) places two applications of the model among contemporary evaluation work. Part II presents one of the applications that investigated the evaluation of four major search engines by 36 undergraduates from three academic disciplines. It reports results from statistical analyses of quantitative data for the entire sample and among disciplines, and content analysis of verbal data containing users' reasons for satisfaction. The proposed model aims to provide systematic feedback to engine developers or service providers for system improvement and to generate useful insight for system design and tool choice. The model can be applied to evaluating other compatible information retrieval systems or information retrieval (IR) techniques. It intends to contribute to developing a theory of relevance that goes beyond topicality to include value and usefulness for designing user-oriented information retrieval systems. [source]


User perspectives on relevance criteria: A comparison among relevant, partially relevant, and not-relevant judgments

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 5 2002
Kelly L. Maglaughlin
This study investigates the use of criteria to assess relevant, partially relevant, and not-relevant documents. Study participants identified passages within 20 document representations that they used to make relevance judgments; judged each document representation as a whole to be relevant, partially relevant, or not relevant to their information need; and explained their decisions in an interview. Analysis revealed 29 criteria, discussed positively and negatively, that were used by the participants when selecting passages that contributed or detracted from a document's relevance. These criteria can be grouped into six categories: abstract (e.g., citability, informativeness), author (e.g., novelty, discipline, affiliation, perceived status), content (e.g., accuracy/validity, background, novelty, contrast, depth/scope, domain, citations, links, relevant to other interests, rarity, subject matter, thought catalyst), full text (e.g., audience, novelty, type, possible content, utility), journal/publisher (e.g., novelty, main focus, perceived quality), and personal (e.g., competition, time requirements). Results further indicate that multiple criteria are used when making relevant, partially relevant, and not-relevant judgments, and that most criteria can have either a positive or negative contribution to the relevance of a document. The criteria most frequently mentioned by study participants were content, followed by criteria characterizing the full text document. These findings may have implications for relevance feedback in information retrieval systems, suggesting that systems accept and utilize multiple positive and negative relevance criteria from users. Systems designers may want to focus on supporting content criteria followed by full text criteria as these may provide the greatest cost benefit. [source]


The effect of individual differences on searching the web

PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2003
Ihadjadene Madjid
This paper reports results from a project which sought to investigate the influence of two types of expertise , the knowledge of the search domain and the experience of the Web search engines - on the use of a Web search engine, called Exalead, by a panel of students. Forty six students (twenty four undergraduate students in psychology and twenty two undergraduates in other disciplines) were asked to give correct answers to eight questions about definitions of psychology concepts, without any time constraint. Results show that participants with good knowledge in the domain on the one hand and participants with high experience of the Web on the other had the best performances. Participants with low experience of the Web showed less effectiveness than the other participants. Future research is proposed to know the best aids to users of information retrieval systems. [source]