Initial Stability (initial + stability)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Effects of Screw Eccentricity on the Initial Stability of the Acetabular Cup in Artificial Foam Bone of Different Qualities

ARTIFICIAL ORGANS, Issue 1 2010
Jui-Ting Hsu
Abstract Acetabular cup loosening is one of the major failure models of total hip replacement (THR), which is mostly due to insufficient initial stability of the cup. Previous studies have demonstrated that cup stability is affected by the quality of the host bone and the surgical skill when inserting screws. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects on the initial stability of the acetabular cup of eccentric screws in bone of different qualities. In this study, hemispherical cups were fixed into bone specimens constructed from artificial foam with three elastic moduli using one to three screws. The effects of two types of screw eccentricity (offset and angular) on the stability of the acetabular cup were also evaluated. The experimental results indicate that in the presence of ideal screwing, the cup was stable in bone specimens constructed from foam with the highest elastic modulus. In addition, increasing the number of ideal screws enhanced the cup stability, especially in bone specimens constructed from soft foam. Moreover, the cup stability was most affected by offset eccentric screw(s) in the hard-foam bone specimens and by angular eccentric screw(s) in the soft-foam bone specimens. The reported results indicate that the presence of screw eccentricity affects the initial stability of the acetabular cup. Surgeons should keep this in mind when performing screw insertions in THR. However, care is necessary when translating these results to the intraoperative situation due to the experiments being conducted under laboratory conditions, and hence, future studies should attempt to replicate the results reported here in vivo. [source]


NS13P A PROSPECTIVE COMPARISON OF TWO CERVICAL INTERBODY FUSION CAGES

ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Issue 2007
M. A. Hansen
Purpose For some time the surgical management of chronic back pain has utilised interbody lumbar cages. Recently interbody cages for use in the cervical spine have been produced. Cervical cages provide initial stability during the fusion process. There is little literature comparing the performance of interbody cage systems due to their relative recent introduction. Methodology Patients with symptomatic cervical degeneration or traumatic lesions were treated with the dynamic ABC 2 Aesculap anterior cervical plating system and either the B-Braun Samarys or Zimmer cage systems. A single surgeon conducted all surgery. Pre- and post-operative radiological examinations were compared. Changes in disc height at affected and adjacent levels, lordosis and evidence of fusion were recorded. Patient outcome was measured with questionnaires. The modified Oswestry neck pain disability and Copenhagen neck disability scale scores were utilised to allow comparison between patients. Results A total of 43 patients were involved in the study (30 with the Zimmer cage system and 13 with the Samarys cage). Patient follow-up has been up to 12 months. Improvement in disability scores was shown in 90% of patients. Follow up imaging did not demonstrate subsidence of the cage or adjacent instability in either group. There was no statistical difference in complication rate between the two groups. Discussion Initial stability was provided by both interbody cervical spine cage system. Rates of fusion and symptomatic relief compared favourably to fusion involving autogenous bone graft without associated morbidity. Longer follow up is necessary to determine whether there is evidence of adjacent level instability or vertebral end-plate subsidence. [source]


Effects of Screw Eccentricity on the Initial Stability of the Acetabular Cup in Artificial Foam Bone of Different Qualities

ARTIFICIAL ORGANS, Issue 1 2010
Jui-Ting Hsu
Abstract Acetabular cup loosening is one of the major failure models of total hip replacement (THR), which is mostly due to insufficient initial stability of the cup. Previous studies have demonstrated that cup stability is affected by the quality of the host bone and the surgical skill when inserting screws. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects on the initial stability of the acetabular cup of eccentric screws in bone of different qualities. In this study, hemispherical cups were fixed into bone specimens constructed from artificial foam with three elastic moduli using one to three screws. The effects of two types of screw eccentricity (offset and angular) on the stability of the acetabular cup were also evaluated. The experimental results indicate that in the presence of ideal screwing, the cup was stable in bone specimens constructed from foam with the highest elastic modulus. In addition, increasing the number of ideal screws enhanced the cup stability, especially in bone specimens constructed from soft foam. Moreover, the cup stability was most affected by offset eccentric screw(s) in the hard-foam bone specimens and by angular eccentric screw(s) in the soft-foam bone specimens. The reported results indicate that the presence of screw eccentricity affects the initial stability of the acetabular cup. Surgeons should keep this in mind when performing screw insertions in THR. However, care is necessary when translating these results to the intraoperative situation due to the experiments being conducted under laboratory conditions, and hence, future studies should attempt to replicate the results reported here in vivo. [source]


Cutting Torque Measurements in Conjunction with Implant Placement in Grafted and Nongrafted Maxillas as an Objective Evaluation of Bone Density: A Possible Method for Identifying Early Implant Failures?

CLINICAL IMPLANT DENTISTRY AND RELATED RESEARCH, Issue 1 2004
Björn Johansson DDS
ABSTRACT Background: Bone grafts are frequently used to enable the placement of dental implants in atrophied jaws. The biomechanical properties of bone grafts used in one- or two-stage implant procedures (in comparison with the use of nongrafted bone) are not well known. Purpose: The purpose of this study was (1) to measure cutting torques during the placement of self-tapping dental implants in nongrafted bone and in bone grafts, either as blocks or in a milled particulate form, in patients undergoing implant treatment in an edentulous maxilla and (2) to identify implants with reduced initial stability and to correlate these findings with a clinical classification of jawbone quality. Materials and Methods: The study included 40 consecutive patients with edentulous maxillas, 27 of whom were subjected to bone grafting prior to or in conjunction with implant placement (grafting group) and 13 of whom received implants without grafting (nongrafted group). Grafted bone from the iliac crest bone was used (1) as onlay blocks, (2) as maxillary sinus inlay blocks, or (3) in particulate form in the maxillary sinus. Implants were placed after 6 to 7 months of healing, except in the maxillary sinus inlay blocks, where implants were placed simultaneously. Cutting torque values were obtained from 113 grafted implant sites and from 109 nongrafted implant sites. Results: Significantly lower cutting torque values were assessed in grafted regions than in nongrafted regions, irrespective of grafting technique. Lower values were also seen for implants placed in block grafts after 6 months when compared to other grafting techniques used. The cutting torque values revealed an inverse linear relation to the Lekholm and Zarb bone quality index. Conclusion: The cutting torque values correlated well with the Lekholm and Zarb index of bone quality. Significantly lower cutting torque values were seen in grafted bone than in nongrafted bone. [source]


Significance of primary stability for osseointegration of dental implants

CLINICAL ORAL IMPLANTS RESEARCH, Issue 3 2006
Natalia Lioubavina-Hack
Abstract Aim: To investigate the significance of the initial stability of dental implants for the establishment of osseointegration in an experimental capsule model for bone augmentation. Material and methods: Sixteen male rats were used in the study. In each rat, muscle-periosteal flaps were elevated on the lateral aspect of the mandibular ramus on both sides, resulting in exposure of the bone surface. Small perforations were then produced in the ramus. A rigid, hemispherical Teflon® capsule with a diameter of 6 mm and a height of 4 mm and with a hole in its middle portion, prepared to fit the circumference of an ITI® HC titanium implant of 2.8 mm in diameter, was fixed to the ramus using 4 mini-screws. On one side of the jaw, the implant was placed through the hole in such a way that its apex did not make contact with the mandibular ramus (test). This placement of the implant did not ensure primary stability. On the other side of the jaw, a similar implant was placed through the hole of the capsule in such a way that contact was made between the implant and the surface of the ramus (control). This provided primary stability of the implant. After placement of the implants, the soft tissues were repositioned over the capsules and sutured. After 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, four animals were sacrificed and subjected to histometric analysis. Results: The mean height of direct bone-to-implant contact of implants with primary stability was 38.8%, 52.9%, 64.6% and 81.3% of the implant length at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, respectively. Of the bone adjacent to the implant surface, 28.1%, 28.9%, 52.6% and 69.6%, respectively, consisted of mineralized bone. At the test implants, no bone-to-implant contact was observed at any observation time or in any of these non-stabilized specimens. Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicate that primary implant stability is a prerequisite for successful osseointegration, and that implant instability results in fibrous encapsulation, thus confirming previously made clinical observations. [source]