Immunological System (immunological + system)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Typing of the immunological system in human embryos by coelocentesis

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF HAEMATOLOGY, Issue 5 2007
Maria Concetta Renda
Abstract Coelocentesis offers a new opportunity for gaining access to the human embryos from 28 d postfertilization. However, while some studies about its biochemical composition have been reported, our knowledge about immunological pattern of this compartment is still limited. For this reason, we studied the human coelomic fluids sampled from 6.6 to 10 wk of gestation. The majority of cellular population consisted in mesenchymal/epithelial cells. In fluids sampled before 10 wk we found only a preT Cell Receptor expression and an absence or a very low frequency of B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes and NK (natural killer) antigens. These preliminary data suggest that the immunological system in human embryos could be in the ideal conditions to start a process of tolerance induction. [source]


Chronic antigen ingestion protects ovalbumin sensitized mice from severe manifestation of Leishmania major infection

PARASITE IMMUNOLOGY, Issue 11-12 2008
J. C. S. SALDANHA
SUMMARY In the present work, the development of experimental leishmaniasis was examined in sensitized BALB/c mice that were chronically fed with antigen. After an oral challenge with egg white solution, the ovalbumin (Ova)-sensitized mice showed an increase in serum anti-Ova IgE and IgG1 antibodies. Lesions induced by Leishmania major infection were reduced by the ingestion of Ova in sensitized mice, as assessed by reduced footpad growth, lower parasite loads and improved pathological outcome compared to sham sensitized mice. Moreover, such findings were connected to a shift to a Th1 response involving higher IFN-, production and serum levels of IgG2a anti- Leishmania antigens. The data appear to corroborate the suggestion that chronic ingestion of an antigen by sensitized mice modulates the immunological system through a shift in cytokine release, exhibiting a healing response and resistance to L. major infection. [source]


Paleopathology and the origin of agriculture in the Levant

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 1 2010
Vered Eshed
Abstract This study addresses changes in health which were consequential to the Neolithic transition in the southern Levant, judged on the basis of the study of specific and nonspecific stress indicators, trauma, and degenerative joint disease in 200 Natufian (hunter-gatherer) skeletons (10,500,8300 BC) and 205 Neolithic (agricultural) skeletons (8300,5500 BC) from the southern Levant. The comparison of the health profiles of pre-Neolithic (Natufian) and Neolithic populations reveals a higher prevalence of lesions indicative of infectious diseases among the Neolithic population, and an overall reduction in the prevalence of skull trauma among males. No change over time was observed in the prevalence of degenerative joint disease. These results indicate that in the southern Levant the Neolithic transition did not simply lead to an overall deterioration in health but rather resulted in a complex health profile which was shaped by 1) an increase exposure to disease agents, 2) changes in diet, 3) population aggregation in larger and denser settlements, 4) changes in activity patterns and the division of labor, and possibly 5) a higher resistant immunological system and response capacity to environmental aggressions (mainly infections). Am J Phys Anthropol 143:121,133, 2010. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Brain death and its implications for management of the potential organ donor

ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 10 2009
J. F. BUGGE
The systemic physiologic changes that occur during and after brain death affect all organs suitable for transplantation. Major changes occur in the cardiovascular, pulmonary, endocrine, and immunological systems, and, if untreated may soon result in cardiovascular collapse and somatic death. Understanding these complex physiologic changes is mandatory for developing effective strategies for donor resuscitation and management in such a way that the functional integrity of potentially transplantable organs is maintained. This review elucidates these physiological changes and their consequences, and based on these consequences the rationale behind current medical management of brain-dead organ donors is discussed. [source]


Mammalian Toll-like receptors: to immunity and beyond

CLINICAL & EXPERIMENTAL IMMUNOLOGY, Issue 3 2005
P. A. Hopkins
Summary Toll-like receptors (TLRs) constitute an archetypal pattern recognition system. Their sophisticated biology underpins the ability of innate immunity to discriminate between highly diverse microbial pathogens and self. However, the remarkable progress made in describing this biology has also revealed new immunological systems and processes previously hidden to investigators. In particular, TLRs appear to have a fundamental role in the generation of clonal adaptive immune responses, non-infectious disease pathogenesis and even in the maintenance of normal mammalian homeostasis. Although an understanding of TLRs has answered some fundamental questions at the host,pathogen interface, further issues, particularly regarding therapeutic modulation of these receptors, have yet to be resolved. [source]