Immunisation Rates (immunisation + rate)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Immunisation Rates in Older Veterans and War Widows

AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL ON AGEING, Issue 3 2000
Balakrishnan Nair
Aim: To study the immunisation rates of veterans and war widows aged 70 years and above in New South Wales and Queensland, as part of the Preventive Care Trial. Method: A trained health care worker assessed subjects at home regarding health, illness and immunisation status. Results: Suboptimal immunisation rate for influenza (72%) and poor rates for pneumococcus (14%) and tetanus (43%) were detected. Conclusion: Subjects in this study were not immunised according to recommended guidelines. Further education campaigns are warranted to improve immunisation rates in older people. [source]


Postnatal home visiting for illicit drug-using mothers and their infants: A randomised controlled trial

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 5 2006
Anne BARTU
Abstract Background:, Postnatal home-visiting programs for illicit drug-using mothers have reported some success in reducing harms in some areas but there is a lack of data on their impact on breastfeeding and immunisation rates. Aims:, To investigate the effect on breastfeeding, immunisation and parental drug use. The hypothesis was that the outcomes of the home-visiting group (HVG) would be superior to the control group (CG). Method:, One hundred and fifty-two illicit drug-using women were recruited at 35,40 weeks gestation from King Edward Memorial Hospital, Perth, Western Australia and randomised after delivery to the HVG or the CG. The HVG had eight home visits; the CG had telephone contact at two months and a home visit at six months. The HVG received education and support for parenting, breastfeeding and child development. This was not provided by the research midwives for the CG. Results:, The main drugs were heroin, amphetamines, cannabis and benzodiazepines. Immunisation rates were similar for each group. Median duration of breastfeeding for the HVG was eight weeks (95% CI, 3.8,12.2); for the CG ten weeks (95% CI, 7.3,12.7). Drug use was reduced during pregnancy but increased by six months post-partum in both groups. The retention rates were: HVG 93%; CG 86%. Conclusion:, The hypothesis for this study was not supported. Long-term studies are urgently required to assess the effects of parental drug use on infant and child development. [source]


Randomised controlled trial of an educational strategy to increase school,based adolescent hepatitis B vaccination

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Issue 3 2000
S. Rachel Skinner
ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate a specifically designed hepatitis B education/promotion curriculum package as part of a successful hepatitis B vaccination delivery system to adolescents. METHODS: A randomised,controlled trial was used to evaluate the effect of the curriculum package (or intervention) on uptake of vaccine. Schools were randomly selected from the metropolitan region of Melbourne to intervention (66 schools or 7,588 students) or control groups (69 schools or 9,823 students). Class teachers administered the intervention to students over 4 class periods before the vaccination course. RESULTS: The difference in mean school uptake between intervention and control was small at 1,2% per dose. 95% confidence intervals around the differences were ,5% to 2% per dose and not significant. Intervention schools taught an average of 7 items out of 12 from the curriculum package. Immunisation rates increased by 4,10% per dose between low and high implementation schools, but this trend was not significant. Impact evaluation demonstrated significantly greater knowledge of hepatitis B and vaccination among students in the intervention than the control group. CONCLUSION: Hepatitis B vaccination of pre,adolescents was not increased by the implementation of a curriculum package that successfully increased knowledge and awareness of hepatitis B in a school,based vaccination program. Additional strategies directed at the education of parents, the cooperative role of schools and pro,active providers might also be required to maximise vaccine uptake in this age group. [source]


Immunisation Rates in Older Veterans and War Widows

AUSTRALASIAN JOURNAL ON AGEING, Issue 3 2000
Balakrishnan Nair
Aim: To study the immunisation rates of veterans and war widows aged 70 years and above in New South Wales and Queensland, as part of the Preventive Care Trial. Method: A trained health care worker assessed subjects at home regarding health, illness and immunisation status. Results: Suboptimal immunisation rate for influenza (72%) and poor rates for pneumococcus (14%) and tetanus (43%) were detected. Conclusion: Subjects in this study were not immunised according to recommended guidelines. Further education campaigns are warranted to improve immunisation rates in older people. [source]


Postnatal home visiting for illicit drug-using mothers and their infants: A randomised controlled trial

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 5 2006
Anne BARTU
Abstract Background:, Postnatal home-visiting programs for illicit drug-using mothers have reported some success in reducing harms in some areas but there is a lack of data on their impact on breastfeeding and immunisation rates. Aims:, To investigate the effect on breastfeeding, immunisation and parental drug use. The hypothesis was that the outcomes of the home-visiting group (HVG) would be superior to the control group (CG). Method:, One hundred and fifty-two illicit drug-using women were recruited at 35,40 weeks gestation from King Edward Memorial Hospital, Perth, Western Australia and randomised after delivery to the HVG or the CG. The HVG had eight home visits; the CG had telephone contact at two months and a home visit at six months. The HVG received education and support for parenting, breastfeeding and child development. This was not provided by the research midwives for the CG. Results:, The main drugs were heroin, amphetamines, cannabis and benzodiazepines. Immunisation rates were similar for each group. Median duration of breastfeeding for the HVG was eight weeks (95% CI, 3.8,12.2); for the CG ten weeks (95% CI, 7.3,12.7). Drug use was reduced during pregnancy but increased by six months post-partum in both groups. The retention rates were: HVG 93%; CG 86%. Conclusion:, The hypothesis for this study was not supported. Long-term studies are urgently required to assess the effects of parental drug use on infant and child development. [source]