Anatomical Variants (anatomical + variants)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Lessons learned from anatomic variants of the hepatic artery in 1,081 transplanted livers

LIVER TRANSPLANTATION, Issue 10 2007
Rafael López-Andújar
The aim of this study is to contribute our experience to the knowledge of the anatomic variations of the hepatic arterial supply. The surgical anatomy of the extrahepatic arterial vascularization was investigated prospectively in 1,081 donor cadaveric livers, transplanted at La Fe University Hospital from January 1991 to August 2004. The vascular anatomy of the hepatic grafts was classified according to Michels description (Am J Surg 1966;112:337-347) plus 2 variations. Anatomical variants of the classical pattern were detected in 30% of the livers (n = 320). The most common variant was a replaced left artery arising from the left gastric artery (9.7%) followed by a replaced right hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery (7.8%). In conclusion, the information about the different hepatic arterial patterns can help in reducing the risks of iatrogenic complications, which in turn may result in better outcomes not only following surgical interventions but also in the context of radiological treatments. Liver Transpl 13:1401,1404, 2007. © 2007 AASLD [source]


The compendium of anatomical variants: New goals and format

CLINICAL ANATOMY, Issue 4 2010
Joel A. Vilensky
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Annual compendium of anatomical variants

CLINICAL ANATOMY, Issue 4 2006
Stephen W. Carmichael Editor-in-Chief
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Resynchronization with Left Ventricle Lead Placement Through the Foramen Ovale

CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY, Issue 6 2009
Christophe D'Ivernois MD
Left ventricle (LV) lead placement in a coronary sinus branch for cardiac resynchronization therapy may fail because of anatomical variants, phrenic nerve stimulation, and/or lead instability. We report a case of successful resynchronization from a lead inserted from the left subclavian vein and positioned through a patent foramen ovale (PFO). In conclusion, endocardial LV lead insertion through a PFO enables effective resynchronization delivery without the risks associated with a thoracotomy or atrial transseptal puncture. Copyright © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]