Analytic Relationship (analytic + relationship)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


THE ANALYTIC RELATIONSHIP: INTEGRATING JUNGIAN, ATTACHMENT THEORY AND DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVES

BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOTHERAPY, Issue 1 2009
Jean Knox
abstract This paper highlights some key features of a Jungian approach to transference and countertransference and suggests that a Jungian model has crucial aspects in common with contemporary views in attachment theory on the nature of the analytic relationship. The analytic relationship is examined in terms of the fundamental processes of psychic development described in attachment theory and affective neuroscience, namely affect regulation and development of reflective function and of self-agency. The relative value of three analytic techniques, those of interpretation, new relational experience and regression, are discussed in relation to these processes. I suggest that each of the traditional psychoanalytic and Jungian analytic models concentrates on differing aspects of these psychic processes and analytic techniques. I construct a grid to illustrate this and to demonstrate how attachment theory and developmental neuroscience offer a theoretical basis on which we can develop an integrated model of the nature of the analytic relationship and tasks. [source]


Relational psychoanalysis and feminism: a crossing of historical paths

PSYCHOTHERAPY AND POLITICS INTERNATIONAL, Issue 1 2003
Luise Eichenbaum
Abstract This paper examines the impact on and interaction between feminism and psychoanalysis over the last 30 years, including the contribution of its authors. It argues that the rise of the relational approach in psychoanalysis corresponds to, and in part stems from, a feminist vision. Gender-conscious psychoanalysis demands a change from a unilateral, analyst-centred, patient-as-object reality to a therapeutic encounter of a mutual reality co-created between two emerging subjectivities, analyst and analysand, in ways that parallel feminism's transformation of and critique of the univocal, male-centred worldview to bring in the voices of the marginalized. The relational approach to psychoanalysis allows fixed categories of gender to open up, and supports creative use of the analyst's subjectivity. The struggle to be connected and yet autonomous in the analytic relationship offers a possible model for relationships in society in general. Copyright 2003 Whurr Publishers Ltd [source]


The act of interpretation,

THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOANALYSIS, Issue 4 2006
ALOYSIO AUGUSTO D'ABREU
The author understands the interpreting act as an attempt to perceive what happens in the transference/countertransference fi eld and not just what happens in the patient's mind. Interpretation transcends mere intellectual communication. It is also an experience in which analysts' emotions work as an important instrument in understanding their patients. Interpretation is seen to possess manifest as well as latent content; the latter would contain the analysts' feelings, emotions and personality. The unconscious content of an interpretation does not inconvenience or preclude the development of the analytic process, but, on the contrary, it allows new associative material to emerge, and it transforms the analytic session into a human relationship. Analysts' awareness of this content derived from patients' apperceptions is a signifi cant instrument for understanding what is happening in the analytic relationship, and what transpires in these sessions provides fundamental elements for analysts' self-analysis. Some clinical examples demonstrate these occurrences in analytic sessions, and how they can be apprehended and used for a better understanding of the patient. The author also mentions the occurrence of diffi culties during the analytic process. These diffi culties are often the result of lapses in an analyst's perception related to unconscious elements of the relationship. [source]


The myths of free association and the potentials of the analytic relationship

THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOANALYSIS, Issue 1 2006
IRWIN Z. HOFFMAN
The author challenges the traditional and still prevalent view of ,free association', arguing that it entails three forms of denial (also formulated in terms of corresponding myths): 1) denial of the patient's free agency; 2) denial of the patient's and the analyst's interpersonal infl uence; and 3) denial of the patient's share of responsibility for co-constructing the analytic relationship. That responsibility includes some degree of consideration of the analyst's needs. Sometimes, the patient's good judgment to that end may be refl ected in what is automatically and mistakenly reduced to a form of ,resistance'. Attention to the patient's responsibility must be balanced against the effort to provide a uniquely safe environment for the patient's revealing of shame and anxiety-ridden feelings and attitudes. But the therapeutic action of psychoanalysis, ideally, includes the cultivation, through lived experience, of the dialectical interplay of self-expression, on the one hand, and caring relational engagement, on the other. Recognition of the patient's free agency does not preclude exploration of constraining structures laid down in the past. On the contrary, it deepens such exploration. At the same time, it opens the door to the possibility of explicit recognition, via challenge, criticism, or affi rmation, of the patient's contributions to the analytic work. [source]


Narcissistic configurations: Violence and its absence in treatment

THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOANALYSIS, Issue 5 2004
ROSINE JOZEF PERELBERG
,On narcissism: An introduction' constitutes a turning point in psychoanalysis. Although narcissism is a concept which has not been explicitly referred to by many important thinkers for decades, it could be said that there is no paper written in psychoanalysis since Freud that does not implicitly take into account the modifi cations in thinking that the work brought about. In this paper, the author contrasts two types of narcissistic confi gurations: in the fi rst, the intolerance of the other is dealt with by expulsion and violence; in the second, by withdrawal. The author contrasts patients who express manifest violent behaviour with patients for whom the violent behaviour is absent but who, nevertheless, present similar background histories, which might have led to a prediction of violence. They are also profoundly different in terms of what they provoke in the countertransference. In addition, this paper argues that the treatment of narcissistic personalities has allowed in recent years the understanding of a modality of depression. Following Green, the author argues that, instead of a fruitless debate that involves evolutionary issues around the concept of narcissism, it is necessary to distinguish the narcissistic aspect in any analytic relationship, to identify the narcissistic transference in different types of psychopathologies. [source]


Repression, transference and reconstruction

THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOANALYSIS, Issue 3 2003
Harold P. Blum
Whereas Peter Fonagy almost dismisses the importance of repression and the recovery of repressed and suppressed memory, the author believes that the analysis of repression retains importance in clinical psychoanalysis. Transference is a return of the repressed, with repressed memories embedded within a fundamental unconscious fantasy constellation. Moreover, transference is an essential, but not the only, route to the understanding and analysis of the patient. Nor should transference be confused with the real or new analytic relationship. The author does not regard the dynamic unconscious as definitely registered and retrieved in procedural memory, awaiting further research. A focus on the present ,self with other' model of therapeutic action neglects pathogenesis and the importance of childhood and its psychoanalytic reconstruction. [source]


THE ANALYTIC RELATIONSHIP: INTEGRATING JUNGIAN, ATTACHMENT THEORY AND DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVES

BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOTHERAPY, Issue 1 2009
Jean Knox
abstract This paper highlights some key features of a Jungian approach to transference and countertransference and suggests that a Jungian model has crucial aspects in common with contemporary views in attachment theory on the nature of the analytic relationship. The analytic relationship is examined in terms of the fundamental processes of psychic development described in attachment theory and affective neuroscience, namely affect regulation and development of reflective function and of self-agency. The relative value of three analytic techniques, those of interpretation, new relational experience and regression, are discussed in relation to these processes. I suggest that each of the traditional psychoanalytic and Jungian analytic models concentrates on differing aspects of these psychic processes and analytic techniques. I construct a grid to illustrate this and to demonstrate how attachment theory and developmental neuroscience offer a theoretical basis on which we can develop an integrated model of the nature of the analytic relationship and tasks. [source]