Analysis Panel (analysis + panel)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Analysis Panel

  • descriptive analysis panel


  • Selected Abstracts


    CONSUMER ACCEPTABILITY, SENSORY AND INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS OF PEANUT SOY SPREADS

    JOURNAL OF FOOD QUALITY, Issue 1 2003
    N.J. DUBOST
    ABSTRACT Textural properties of commercial peanut butter, commercial soy nut spread and three formulated peanut soy spreads with 8, 14, and 20% isolated soy protein were characterized using the Texture Analyser TA.TX2 Significant differences were found between the textural parameters of the treatments (,=0.05). Testing of color, aroma and textural attributes by a descriptive analysis panel indicated significant differences existed between the treatments. Based on consumer acceptability testing using a three-point acceptability scale, the three peanut soy spreads were acceptable products. A mathematical relationship (R2= 0.5) existed between the sensory descriptor aroma and consumer acceptability, and between superior quality (tastes great) and aroma and mouthcoating. No significant relationships were observed between instrumental and consumer acceptability testing. [source]


    Sensory Profiles of Bread Made from Paired Samples of Organic and Conventionally Grown Wheat Grain

    JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE, Issue 4 2007
    L.E. Annett
    ABSTRACT:, The Canadian hard red spring wheat cultivar "Park" was grown in 2005 in Edmonton, AB, Canada on both conventionally and organically managed land, situated less than 1 km apart. Grains from the paired wheat samples were compared for cereal-grain-quality attributes. For sensory analysis, organically and conventionally produced wheat grains were milled into flour and baked into 60% whole wheat bread. Color, texture, taste, and aroma attributes of bread were compared using the sensory technique of descriptive analysis. Organic grain contained more wholemeal protein than conventional grain (P, 0.05), but both were greater than 14% protein, indicating excellent grain quality for yeast-leavened bread. Mixograph analysis revealed that conventional flour produced stronger bread dough than organic flour (P, 0.05). Visual observation confirmed these findings as conventional flour produced larger bread loaf volume. Fourteen sensory attributes were generated by the descriptive analysis panel. No differences were observed for flavor, aroma, or color attributes (P > 0.05), but the panel perceived the organic bread to be more "dense" in texture (P, 0.05) with smaller air cells in the appearance of the crumb (P, 0.05) than conventional bread. [source]


    EFFECTS OF DELIVERY METHOD ON THE SENSORY PERCEPTION OF SEMISOLID DAIRY DESSERTS

    JOURNAL OF SENSORY STUDIES, Issue 5 2004
    L. ENGELEN
    ABSTRACT This study tests the possibility that sensory attributes are affected by the method by which a food is transferred to the mouth. For example, hot liquids appear to be considerably hotter when taken through a straw than when taken using a cup. Pre-weighed samples of two vanilla flavoured dairy custards were presented, in random order, to 16 trained panellists using a spoon, an 11-mm diameter straw or a modified straw that had a 4-mm diameter constriction within it. Panellists rated products using a subset of attributes generated by a quantitative descriptive analysis panel. The amount ingested was measured by re-weighing each sample after assessment. Each experiment was repeated three times. There were significant differences in the amount ingested for the two products. The delivery method had no effect on the sensory attributes of the products other than for thickness and melting, where products taken with the spoon were rated as less viscous than when taken through a straw. The constriction in the straw had no effect on either the amount ingested or on any of the sensory attributes. This study demonstrates that resistance to sucking does not affect perception of thickness. [source]


    THE INFLUENCE OF SOLUTION VISCOSITY AND DIFFERENT VISCOSIFYING AGENTS ON APPLE JUICE FLAVOR

    JOURNAL OF SENSORY STUDIES, Issue 3 2000
    SHANE WALKER
    ABSTRACT Viscosifying agents are used in foods as thickeners to produce improved mouthfeel and as stabilizers to prevent settling out of particulate matter. While viscosifying agents are also known to influence the sensory profile of the products in which they are used, previous studies have examined the effects of viscosifying agents at levels that are not typical of those used in foods. The current study used a descriptive analysis panel to examine the effects of both viscosity and viscosifying agent on the sensory properties of apple juice using three viscosifying agents (carboxymethylcellulose, xanthan and pectin) at levels of usage similar to those recommended for drink products. Gas chromatography-flame ionization detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were conducted on the samples to relate alteration in physico-chemical parameters to changes in sensory profile. Results from the descriptive panel showed that increasing viscosity tended to decrease some aspects of flavor intensity (sourness and cooked apple odor). Individual viscosifying agents were shown to have specific effects on odor and flavor attributes, e.g. pectin enhanced cereal odor. Gas chromatography-flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry suggested that this effect was related to isopropyl alcohol contributed by the pectin in solution. Pectin also suppressed honey odor and flavor, lemon odor and cooked apple flavor. [source]


    Web log analysis panel

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2007
    Bernard J. Jansen (moderator)
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Complete mutation analysis panel of the 39 human HOX genes

    BIRTH DEFECTS RESEARCH, Issue 2 2002
    Kenjiro Kosaki
    Background The HOX gene family consists of highly conserved transcription factors that specify the identity of the body segments along the anteroposterior axis of the embryo. Because the phenotypes of mice with targeted disruptions of Hox genes resemble some patterns of human malformations, mutations in HOX genes have been expected to be associated with a significant number of human malformations. Thus far, however, mutations have been documented in only three of the 39 human HOX genes (HOXD13, HOXA13, and HOXA11) partly because current knowledge on the complete coding sequence and genome structure is limited to only 20 of the 39 human HOX genes. Methods Taking advantage of the human and mouse draft genome sequences, we attempted to characterize the remaining 19 human HOX genes by bioinformatic analysis including phylogenetic footprinting, the probabilistic prediction method, and comparison of genomic sequences with the complete set of the human anonymous cDNA sequences. Results We were able to determine the full coding sequences of 19 HOX genes and their genome structure and successfully designed a complete set of PCR primers to amplify the entire coding region of each of the 39 HOX genes from genomic DNA. Conclusions Our results indicate the usefulness of bioinformatic analysis of the draft genome sequences for clinically oriented research projects. It is hoped that the mutation panel provided here will serve as a launchpad for a new discourse on the genetic basis of human malformations. Teratology 65:50,62, 2002. 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]