Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection (anomalous + pulmonary_venous_connection)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Retrosternal Compression Seven Years after Surgical Correction of Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection: Scimitar Syndrome

JOURNAL OF CARDIAC SURGERY, Issue 1 2009
Eva Maria B. Delmo Walter M.D.
Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a mass compressing the right ventricle. Magnetic resonance tomogram showed its exact retrosternal location and nature. A computed tomography-guided drainage decompressed the mass. Because of cystic wall persistence, a surgical extirpation of the whole cystic cavity was deemed necessary. [source]


Left Superior Vena Cava Draining into the Left Atrium, Associated with Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection: Surgical Correction

JOURNAL OF CARDIAC SURGERY, Issue 4 2005
Andrea Quarti M.D.
Although intra-atrial rerouting techniques, in patients with no connecting vein, have proved to be reliable and successful, in many cases the extracardiac repair is preferable. We report a case of a 5-month-old patient with a not connected left superior vena cava draining into the left atrium, associated with atrial septal defect and partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. The correction has been achieved by rerouting the pulmonary venous return into the left atrium and by transposition of the left vena cava on the right appendage. [source]


Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection: Correction by Intra-atrial Baffle and Cavo-atrial Anastomosis

JOURNAL OF CARDIAC SURGERY, Issue 2 2002
O. Baron M.D.
An intra-atrial baffle, combined with cavo-atrial anastomosis, has been proposed to avoid these complications. The authors report their recent experience with this operative technique. From January 1997 to December 2000, 7 patients with a mean age of 13.5 9 (2,31) years were operated according to this technique. Only one child did not have an associated atrial septal defect. The mean number of pulmonary veins connected to the superior vena cava was 2.5 0.5. The immediate postoperative course was uneventful for the seven patients. The mean follow-up was 20 17 months. No patient developed arrhythmia or superior vena cava or pulmonary vein obstruction at echocardiography. This surgical technique appears to constitute an attractive alternative when pulmonary veins drain abnormally into the superior vena cava above the cavo-atrial junction. [source]


Left Superior Vena Cava Draining into the Left Atrium, Associated with Partial Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection: Surgical Correction

JOURNAL OF CARDIAC SURGERY, Issue 4 2005
Andrea Quarti M.D.
Although intra-atrial rerouting techniques, in patients with no connecting vein, have proved to be reliable and successful, in many cases the extracardiac repair is preferable. We report a case of a 5-month-old patient with a not connected left superior vena cava draining into the left atrium, associated with atrial septal defect and partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. The correction has been achieved by rerouting the pulmonary venous return into the left atrium and by transposition of the left vena cava on the right appendage. [source]


Fate of the unligated vertical vein after repair of supracardiac anomalous pulmonary venous connection

JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, Issue 7 2005
YF Cheung
Objective: To determine the fate of the unligated vertical vein after repair of isolated supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC). Methods: We reviewed the outcome of 28 patients who were diagnosed to have isolated supracardiac TAPVC and determined the fate of the unligated vertical vein. Results: Of the 28 patients, four died before surgery. The remaining 24 patients underwent surgical correction of TAPVC with (n = 5) or without (n = 19) ligation of vertical vein at a median age of 20 days (range: 1,574 days). There were no significant differences in age, weight, presence of pulmonary venous obstruction, need for preoperative inotropic and ventilatory support, cardiopulmonary bypass duration, postoperative pulmonary hypertensive crisis and requirement of peritoneal dialysis between patients with and those without vertical vein ligation. The in-hospital surgical mortality was 50% (12/24), with 83% (10/12) of deaths occurring before 1990. Patients who died after surgery were significantly younger (median age: 5.5 days vs 37 days, P = 0.005), lighter (3.3 0.5 kg vs 3.9 0.6 kg, P = 0.016), more likely to have pulmonary venous obstruction preoperatively (75% vs 12%, P = 0.039) and have undergone surgery before 1990 (83% vs 33%, P = 0.036). The 12 survivors were followed up for a median of 4.7 years (range: 2.3,18.1 years), 10 of whom had their vertical vein unligated. The vertical vein remained patent in five (50%) patients, while stenosis of pulmonary venous anastomosis was only present in one patient. Of these five patients, three had subsequently undergone surgical ligation of the vertical vein to eliminate a large left-to-right shunt. Conclusions: Patency of the unligated vertical vein is common after the repair of supracardiac TAPVC, even in the absence of pulmonary venous obstruction. The degree of left-to-right shunt through the patent vertical vein may be so significant as to warrant surgical ligation. [source]


Stent implantation as a stabilization technique in supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous connection

CATHETERIZATION AND CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS, Issue 4 2006
Adrienne Kilgore MD
Abstract A 6-week-old male presented in-extremis with obstructed supra-cardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Balloon dilation and stent implantation in the stenotic segment of the vertical vein relieved the obstruction until the patient was stable enough to undergo surgical repair. An unusual form of extrinsic vertical vein compression was found at surgery. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]