Home

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences

Kinds of Home

  • aged care home
  • at home
  • care home
  • child home
  • dutch nursing home
  • family home
  • foster home
  • group home
  • medical home
  • new home
  • nursing home
  • own home
  • parental home
  • participant home
  • patient home
  • private home
  • residential care home
  • residential home
  • return home
  • returning home
  • second home
  • small group home
  • veteran home

  • Terms modified by Home

  • home address
  • home admission
  • home alone
  • home and family
  • home base
  • home bias
  • home birth
  • home blood pressure
  • home blood pressure monitoring
  • home cage
  • home care
  • home care client
  • home care services
  • home caregiver
  • home characteristic
  • home community
  • home cost
  • home country
  • home death
  • home environment
  • home facility
  • home front
  • home garden
  • home hazard
  • home health care
  • home help
  • home interview
  • home laboratory
  • home management
  • home market
  • home mechanical ventilation
  • home modifications
  • home monitoring
  • home nursing care
  • home observation
  • home office
  • home ownership
  • home page
  • home patient
  • home placement
  • home population
  • home practice
  • home production
  • home programme
  • home range
  • home range size
  • home residence
  • home residency
  • home resident
  • home safety assessment
  • home setting
  • home site
  • home source
  • home staff
  • home therapy
  • home town
  • home treatment
  • home use
  • home version
  • home visit
  • home visitor

  • Selected Abstracts


    Acceptance and disclosure of HIV status through an integrated community/home-based care program in South Africa

    INTERNATIONAL NURSING REVIEW, Issue 4 2007

    Aim:, To report the outcome of a comparative study among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs) served by an integrated community/home-based care (ICHC) programme and those who are not in any home-based care programme in terms of acceptance and disclosure of the HIV status. Background:, One of the major challenges in HIV/AIDS care in developing countries is acceptance and disclosure of a positive HIV status by PLWHAs. Denial and non-disclosure of HIV status hinders prevention efforts as well as access to treatment, care and support for PLWHAs. Methods:, Quantitative data were collected in 2004 from a group of PLWHAs served by the ICHC programme and a group that was not receiving any community/home-based care. Data were compared between the two groups in terms of acceptance and disclosure of HIV status. Findings:, The ICHC was effective in improving acceptance and disclosure of the HIV-positive status by PLWHAs in the programme. PLWHAs in the ICHC programme did not find disclosure of their status difficult, and had disclosed their positive HIV status to more people than those who are not in any programme. PLWHAs in the ICHC programme not only disclosed their positive HIV status within their family network and households, but also disclosed to the community in general, sports group, religious groups and other social networks. Conclusions:, Community/home-based care programmes can serve as catalysts for acceptance and disclosure of a positive HIV status by PLWHAs. [source]


    GOVERNING FOR RESPONSIBILITY AND WITH LOVE: PARENTS AND CHILDREN BETWEEN HOME AND SCHOOL

    EDUCATIONAL THEORY, Issue 1 2008
    Benjamin Baez
    Where these two objectives converge is in their techniques: they both use the parent-child relationship and what appears to motivate it. Drawing on Michel Foucault's conceptualization of government as "the conduct of conduct," Baez and Talburt analyze two pamphlets with an eye to several themes: the "commonsensical" nature of its address to loving parents; the "responsibilization" of parents and children; the insidious entry of school goals and behavioral norms into homes; and the seeming empowerment of the parent as partner in his or her child's learning. Finally, the authors discuss how the logic of modern forms of governing families and schools might be contested. [source]


    "OUR HOME IS DROWNING": IĐUPIAT STORYTELLING AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN POINT HOPE, ALASKA,

    GEOGRAPHICAL REVIEW, Issue 4 2008
    CHIE SAKAKIBARA
    ABSTRACT. Contemporary storytelling among the IĐupiat of Point Hope, Alaska, is a means of coping with the unpredictable future that climate change poses. Arctic climate change impacts IĐupiat lifeways on a cultural level by threatening their homeland, their sense of place, and their respect for the bowhead whale that is the basis of their cultural identity. What I found during my fieldwork was that traditional storytelling processed environmental changes as a way of maintaining a connection to a disappearing place. In this article I describe how environmental change is culturally manifest through tales of the supernatural, particularly spirit beings or ghosts. The types of IĐupiat stories and modes of telling them reveal people's uncertainty about the future. Examining how people perceive the loss of their homeland, I argue that IĐupiat storytelling both reveals and is a response to a changing physical and spiritual landscape. [source]


    FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF OLDER ADULTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE LIVING AT HOME

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 8 2010
    FNP-C, Janquilyn D. Merida MS
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    THE POSITIVE FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTION OF HOME-BASED PRIMARY CARE PROGRAMS: GENERATING REVENUE OR REDUCING HEALTH EXPENDITURE?

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 12 2008
    Jeremy M. Jacobs MBBS
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    EFFECT OF MARINADE AND DRYING TEMPERATURE ON INACTIVATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI O157:H7 ON INOCULATED HOME DRIED BEEF JERKY

    JOURNAL OF FOOD SAFETY, Issue 3 2002
    SUSAN N. ALBRIGHT
    ABSTRACT Beef slices were inoculated (5.7,7.5 log CFU/cm2) with a 4-strain composite of E. coli O157:H7, stored (4C, 24 h), marinated (4C, 24 h), dried for 10 h at 62.5C or 68.3C, and stored for 90 days at 21C. Unmarinated beef slices dried for 10 h at 62.5C were used to determine the relative contribution of the marinate versus temperature treatment in the 62.5C trials. Samples were analyzed (bacterial enumeration with selective and nonselective agar media, pH, and aw) following inoculation, marinating, at 4, 6, 8 and 10 h of drying, and after 30, 60 and 90 days of storage. Marination resulted in slight changes in bacterial populations (,0.3 to + 0.6 log CFU/cm2), but did not enhance bacterial reduction during drying. For all treatments, most bacterial reductions occurred in the first 4 h of drying, with little reduction thereafter. After 10 h of drying, bacterial reductions were 3.2,3.4 log CFU/cm2 for unmarinated beef slices dried at 62.5C. Reductions of 2.2 and 3.0,4.6 log CFU/cm2 were achieved in marinated jerky slices dried at 62.5C and 68.3C, respectively. No treatment resulted in the recommended 5-log reduction at the end of 10 h drying. However, bacteria did become undetectable by direct plating (<10 CFU/cm2) following 30 days of storage in all treatments except the unmarinated beef slices plated on tryptic soy agar (TSA). Additional work is needed to develop procedures for adequate destruction of E. coli O157:H7 during drying of beef jerky. [source]


    THE THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCE IN HOME-BASED FAMILY THERAPY: IS IT PREDICTIVE OF OUTCOME?

    JOURNAL OF MARITAL AND FAMILY THERAPY, Issue 1 2002
    Lee N. Johnson
    This study examined the association between the therapeutic alliance in family therapy and changes in symptom distress, interpersonal relationships, and family coping. The participants (N = 81) were members of low socioeconomic status families referred to a university clinic for in-home family therapy. Participants completed the Outcome Questionnaire, Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation, and the Family Therapy Alliance questionnaires. Regression analyses revealed that the therapeutic alliance explained 19% of the variance in symptom distress changes for mother, 55% for fathers, and 39% for adolescents. The implications of these findings for practicing and researching family therapy are presented. [source]


    LOW-INCOME HOMEOWNERSHIP: DOES IT NECESSARILY MEAN SACRIFICING NEIGHBORHOOD QUALITY TO BUY A HOME?

    JOURNAL OF URBAN AFFAIRS, Issue 2 2010
    ANNA M. SANTIAGO
    ABSTRACT:,Questions have been raised about the wisdom of low-income homeownership policies for many reasons. One potential reason to be skeptical: low-income homebuyers perhaps may be constrained to purchase homes in disadvantaged neighborhoods. This is a potential problem because home purchases in such neighborhoods: (1) may limit appreciation; (2) may reduce quality of life for adults; and (3) may militate against reputed advantages of homeownership for children. Our study examines the neighborhood conditions of a group of 126 low-income homebuyers who purchased their first home with assistance from the Home Ownership Program (HOP) operated by the Denver Housing Authority. Our approach is distinguished by its use of a comprehensive set of objective and subjective indicators measuring the neighborhood quality of pre-move and post-move neighborhoods. Do low-income homebuyers sacrifice neighborhood quality to buy their homes? Our results suggest that the answer to this question is more complex than it might at first appear. On the one hand, HOP homebuyers purchased in a wide variety of city and suburban neighborhoods. Nonetheless, a variety of neighborhood quality indicators suggest that these neighborhoods, on average, were indeed inferior to those of Denver homeowners overall and to those in the same ethnic group. However, our analyses also revealed that their post-move neighborhoods were superior to the ones they lived in prior to homeownership. Moreover, very few HOP destination neighborhoods evinced severe physical, environmental, infrastructural, or socioeconomic problems, as measured by a wide variety of objective indicators or by the homebuyers' own perceptions. Indeed, only 10% of HOP homebuyers perceived that their new neighborhoods were worse than their prior ones, and only 8% held pessimistic expectations about their new neighborhoods' quality of life. Finally, we found that Black homebuyers fared less well than their Latino counterparts, on average, in both objective and subjective measures. [source]


    Kangaroo Mother Care, home environment and father involvement in the first year of life: a randomized controlled study

    ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 9 2009
    R Tessier
    Abstract Aims:, This study tested the hypothesis that Kangaroo Mother Care creates a climate in the family, which enhances infants' performance on the developmental quotient scale. Setting:, The largest social security hospital in Colombia with a neonatal intensive care unit. Subjects:, At 12 months of corrected age, 194 families in the Kangaroo Mother Care group and 144 families in the Traditional Care group were available for analysis. Interventions:, Infants were kept 24 h/day in an upright position, in skin-to-skin contact until it was no longer tolerated by the infants. Babies in the Traditional Care were kept in incubators on the Minimal Care Unit until they satisfied the usual discharge criteria. Outcome measures:, The Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME), Father Involvement and Developmental Quotient (Griffiths) scores. Results:, 1) Kangaroo mothers created a more stimulating context and a better caregiving environment than mothers in the Traditional Care group; 2) this environment was positively correlated to father involvement and 3) the family environment of male infants was most improved by Kangaroo Mother Care. Conclusion:, Kangaroo Mother Care has a positive impact on home environment. The results also suggest, first, that both parents should be involved as direct caregivers in the Kangaroo Mother Care procedure and secondly, that this intervention should be directed more specifically at infants who are more at risk at birth. The Kangaroo Mother Care intervention could be an excellent means to ensure parents' mature involvement in the future of their children. [source]


    INFECTIONS IN NURSING HOMES: IS IT TIME TO REVISE THE McGEER CRITERIA?

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 1 2010
    Monique Rothan-Tondeur PhD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    NOROVIRUS OUTBREAKS IN NURSING HOMES

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 10 2005
    Paul J. Drinka MD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    RACIAL DIFFERENCES IN PRESSURE ULCER PREVALENCE IN NURSING HOMES

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 6 2005
    Kate L. Lapane PhD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    II. BABY HOMES IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    MONOGRAPHS OF THE SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 3 2008
    Article first published online: 24 NOV 200
    First page of article [source]


    The voice of detainees in a high security setting on services for people with personality disorder

    CRIMINAL BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL HEALTH, Issue 4 2002
    Sue Ryan
    Background British government Home and Health Departments have been consulting widely about service development for people with ,dangerous severe personality disorder' (DSPD). There has, however, been no consultation with service users, nor is there any user view literature in this area. Methods All people detained in one high security hospital under the legal classification of psychopathic disorder were eligible but those on the admission or intensive care wards were not approached. Views of service were elicited using a purpose designed semi-structured interview. The principal researcher was independent of all clinical teams. Confidentiality about patients' views was assured. Aims To establish views on services from one subgroup of people nominated by the government department as having ,DSPD'. Results Sixty-one of 89 agreed to interview. With security a given, about half expressed a preference for a high security hospital setting, 20% prison and 25% elsewhere, generally medium secure hospitals. Participants most valued caring, understanding and ,experience' among staff. An ideal service was considered to be one within small, domestic living units, providing group and individual therapies. Some found living with people with mental illness difficult, but some specified not wanting segregated units. Views were affected by gender and comorbidity. Conclusions As the sample were all in hospital, the emphasis on treatment may reflect a placement bias. All but five participants, however, had had experience of both health and criminal justice services, so were well placed to talk with authority about preferences. Copyright ę 2002 Whurr Publishers Ltd. [source]


    Women's Empowerment Through Home,based Work: Evidence from India

    DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE, Issue 3 2003
    Paula Kantor
    This article examines the extent to which home,based production in the garment sector of Ahmedabad, India, serves to empower its female participants, defining empowerment in terms of control over enterprise income and decision,making within the household. It places this question within the literatures on resource theory and bargaining models of the household, both of which posit that improved access to resources increases women's power in the household. This study highlights why access to resources may not lead so directly to improvements in women's position in the household in the Indian context. It then discusses why home,based work may be less empowering than sources of work outside of the home. The arguments about the empowerment potential of women's access to resources through home,based work are tested by examining, first, the determinants of control over the income generated by women in home,based garment production and, second, to what extent access to and control over income from this source translates into involvement in decisions which are atypically women's and yet important to their lives. The results provide a better understanding of the potential of home,based work to offer women in urban India a source of economic activity that also can translate into increased intra,household power. [source]


    Response to the letter by Philip Home

    DIABETIC MEDICINE, Issue 6 2006
    S. Roze
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    One-year outcome of an early intervention in psychosis service: a naturalistic evaluation

    EARLY INTERVENTION IN PSYCHIATRY, Issue 3 2007
    Swaran P. Singh
    Abstract Aim: We conducted a 1-year prospective evaluation of an early intervention in psychosis service (Early Treatment and Home-based Outreach Service (ETHOS)) during its first 3 years of operation in South-west London, UK. Methods: All patients referred to ETHOS underwent structured assessments at baseline and at 1-year follow-up. In addition, hospitalization rates of ETHOS patients (intervention group) were compared with a non-randomized parallel cohort (comparison group) of first-episode patients treated by community mental health teams. Results: The Early Treatment and Home-based Outreach Servicepatients experienced significant improvements in symptomatic and functional outcomes, especially vocational recovery. The service received only a quarter of eligible patients from referring teams. ETHOS patients did not differ from the comparison group in number of admissions, inpatient days or detention rates. Although number of referrals increased over time, there was no evidence that patients were being referred earlier. Conclusions: There is now robust evidence for the effectiveness of specialist early intervention services. However, such services must be adequate resourced, including an early detection team and provision of their own inpatient unit. [source]


    Participation Patterns in Home-Based Family Support Programs: Ethnic Variations,

    FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 1 2003
    Karen McCurdy
    This study investigated the relationship between ethnicity and retention among families participating in a national network of home-based family support programs. Using archival data collected on 224 African American, 227 European American, and 219 Latino American mothers of newborns and 153 home visitors, multivariate analyses indicate greater participation by African American and Latino parents as compared with European American parents. Retention predictors vary by ethnicity. Strategies to form a supportive parent-provider alliance are discussed. [source]


    Home-based acupuncture: a study in xerostoma

    FOCUS ON ALTERNATIVE AND COMPLEMENTARY THERAPIES AN EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACH, Issue 2006
    AM Cheville
    [source]


    Acquisition of Spanish Gender Agreement in Two Learning Contexts: Study Abroad and At Home

    FOREIGN LANGUAGE ANNALS, Issue 2 2010
    Christina Isabelli-GarcÝa
    Abstract: The goal of this study is to describe the acquisition rate for gender acquisition in Spanish and to show whether individual variability and language contact may affect this rate. The participants were intermediate second language Spanish (first language English) learners in the study abroad and at-home contexts over a 4-month period. The participants received grammaticality judgment tests coded for morphological class of the modified noun as well as attributive and predicative adjectives. Data were also collected on social behavior and language contact in Spanish and English in order to explain data outcome. The findings suggest that no difference exists between the two learning contexts and that social behavior and language contact abroad have minimal influence on acquisition rate. [source]


    Men Making Home: Masculinity and Domesticity in Eighteenth-Century Britain

    GENDER & HISTORY, Issue 3 2009
    Karen Harvey
    Eighteenth-century England is, for many scholars, the time and place where modern domesticity was invented; the point at which ,home' became a key concept sustained by new literary imaginings and new social practices. But as gendered individuals, and certainly compared to women, men are notable for their absence in accounts of the eighteenth-century domestic interior. In this essay, I examine the relationship between constructs of masculinity and meanings of home. During the eighteenth century, ,home' came to mean more than one's dwelling; it became a multi-faceted state of being, encompassing the emotional, physical, moral and spatial. Masculinity intersected with domesticity at all levels and stages in its development. The nature of men's engagements with home were understood through a model of ,oeconomy', which brought together the home and the world, primarily through men's activities. Indeed, this essay proposes that attention to how this multi-faceted eighteenth-century ,home' was made in relation to masculinity shifts our understanding of home as a private and feminine space opposed to an ,outside' and public world. [source]


    Un/safe/ly at Home: Narratives of Sexual Coercion in 1920s Egypt

    GENDER & HISTORY, Issue 3 2004
    Marilyn Booth
    This paper takes up an Arabic narrative genre that appeared in the 1920s. Its distinctive narrative properties included adoption of a first-person female experiental voice and a focus on `impolite' social realms. Combining confessional exposÚ and social polemic in what I am calling `simulated memoirs', these narrating voices offered readers the narrative authority of first-hand experience in Cairo's underworld and critique of elite politics and spaces of behaviour from the constructed perspective of subaltern social figures. I argue that these text's inscriptions of bodily coercion trace an anxiety about growing female visibility throughout urban space. Construction of feminine narrative voices apparently wrests authority to speak about gendered bodily violence away from elite, mostly male commentators and representatives of the state, transferring that authority to the figure of the `fallen' female who `speaks'. But this is an act of ventriloquism: complex layerings of authorial and narrative attribution recoup that authority, reasserting the disciplinary power of the patriarchal father over the lives and vulnerabilities of the young. [source]


    ,I'm Home for the Kids': Contradictory Implications for Work,Life Balance of Teleworking Mothers

    GENDER, WORK & ORGANISATION, Issue 5 2008
    Margo Hilbrecht
    This study explores the experience of time flexibility and its relationship to work,life balance among married female teleworkers with school-aged children. Drawing from a larger study of teleworkers from a Canadian financial corporation, 18 mothers employed in professional positions discussed work, leisure and their perceptions of work,life balance in in-depth interviews. Telework was viewed positively because flexible scheduling facilitated optimal time management. A key factor was the pervasiveness of caregiving, which could result in ongoing tensions and contradictions between the ethic of care and their employment responsibilities. The ideology of ,intensive mothering' meant that work schedules were closely tied to the rhythms of children's school and leisure activities. The different temporal demands of motherhood and employment resulted in little opportunity for personal leisure. Time ,saved' from not having to commute to an office was reallocated to caregiving, housework or paid employment rather than to time for their self. The women also experienced a traditional gendered division of household labour and viewed telework as a helpful tool for combining their dual roles. Time flexibility enhanced their sense of balancing work and life and their perceived quality of life. At the same time, they did not question whether having the primary responsibility for caregiving while engaged in paid employment at home was fair or whether it was a form of exploitation. [source]


    Men at Work and at Home: Managing Emotion in Telework

    GENDER, WORK & ORGANISATION, Issue 1 2008
    Katy Marsh
    Home-based telework, as one of the flexible working options available today, is unique in its ability to blur physically and emotionally the boundaries between work and home. This article explores how men experience working from home, how they construct their identities as workers and as parents in this ambiguous location and how, as fathers, they manage the emotional work of reconciling family and career in this context. Our findings suggest that in order to manage the emotional aspects of telework men will, at times, focus on either the professional or parental part of their identity in their narratives, and at times attempt to ,have it all'. We conclude that telework can provide a space where men can adopt emotional discourses and practices traditionally associated with women and, particularly, with working mothers. [source]


    Mobile locations: construction of home in a group of mobile transnational professionals

    GLOBAL NETWORKS, Issue 1 2007
    MAGDALENA NOWICKA
    Abstract How do professionals constitute their homes under conditions of extensive mobility? The study is based on interviews with professionals working for an international organization who are chronically mobile. Despite their high mobility, they describe little difficulty constructing homes. Home can best be understood here not as a fixed location, but as a set of relationships, to both humans and non-humans. There are elements of spatial proximity, but also of distance, and homes may be defined by both objects present and excluded. They may be a focal point, but at the same time part of a heterogeneous network that spans localities as well as binds past and present. Home is therefore territorially defined, but only as an extended network rather than as a bounded location. [source]


    Time to Send the Preemie Home?

    HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 2p1 2009
    Additional Maturity at Discharge, Outcomes, Subsequent Health Care Costs
    Objective. To determine whether longer stays of premature infants allowing for increased physical maturity result in subsequent postdischarge cost savings that help counterbalance increased inpatient costs. Data Sources. One thousand four hundred and two premature infants born in the Northern California Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program between 1998 and 2002. Study Design/Methods. Using multivariate matching with a time-dependent propensity score we matched 701 "Early" babies to 701 "Late" babies (developmentally similar at the time the earlier baby was sent home but who were discharged on average 3 days later) and assessed subsequent costs and clinical outcomes. Principal Findings. Late babies accrued inpatient costs after the Early baby was already home, yet costs after discharge through 6 months were virtually identical across groups, as were clinical outcomes. Overall, after the Early baby went home, the Late,Early cost difference was $5,016 (p<.0001). A sensitivity analysis suggests our conclusions would not easily be altered by failure to match on some unmeasured covariate. Conclusions. In a large integrated health care system, if a baby is ready for discharge (as defined by the typical criteria), staying longer increased inpatient costs but did not reduce postdischarge costs nor improve postdischarge clinical outcomes. [source]


    An epigenetic induction of a right-shift in hippocampal asymmetry: Selectivity for short- and long-term potentiation but not post-tetanic potentiation

    HIPPOCAMPUS, Issue 1 2008
    Akaysha C. Tang
    Abstract In humans, it is well established that major psychological functions are asymmetrically represented between the left and right cerebral cortices. The developmental origin of such functional lateralization remains unknown. Using the rat as a model system, we examined whether exposing neonates briefly to a novel environment can differentially affect synaptic plasticity in the left and right hippocampi during adulthood. During the first 3 weeks of life, one half of the pups from a litter spent 3 min daily away from their familiar home environment (Novel) while their littermates remained in that familiar environment (Home). At adulthood (7-months old), post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) of excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSPs), a very short-lasting form of plasticity, was greater among the Novel than the Home rats in both left and right hippocampi. In contrast, the novelty-induced increases in short- and long-term potentiation (STP, LTP), two relatively longer-lasting forms of plasticity, were found only in the right hippocampus. These findings demonstrate that a phase-selective asymmetry in hippocampal synaptic plasticity can be induced epigenetically by seemingly small systematic differences in early life environment. The selectivity of this asymmetry for the longer-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity suggests that the observed asymmetry in plasticity may contribute specifically to an asymmetric learning process which, in turn, may contribute to a functional asymmetry in the neocortex. ę 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Post-modern Gandhi and Other Essays: Gandhi in the World and at Home By Lloyd I. Rudolph and Susanne Hoeber Rudolph

    HISTORY, Issue 311 2008
    ANTONY COPLEY
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Bringing the Empire Back Home: France in the Global Age By Herman Lebovics

    HISTORY, Issue 305 2007
    MARTIN THOMAS
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Home and Identity: In Memory of Iris Marion Young

    HYPATIA, Issue 3 2008
    ALLISON WEIR
    Drawing on Iris Marion Young's essay, "House and Home: Feminist Variations on a Theme,'' Weir argues for an alternative ideal of home that involves: (1) the risk of connection, and of sustaining relationship through conflict; (2) relational identities, constituted through both relations of power and relations of mutuality, love, and flourishing; (3) relational autonomy: freedom as the capacity to be in relationships one desires, and freedom as expansion of self in relationship; and (4) connection to past and future, through reinterpretive preservation and transformative identification. [source]