American Foreign Policy (american + foreign_policy)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


"Nothing to Seek and . . . Nothing to Defend": George F. Kennan's Core Values and American Foreign Policy, 1938,1993*

DIPLOMATIC HISTORY, Issue 5 2006
Joshua Botts
First page of article [source]


9/11 and American Foreign Policy*

DIPLOMATIC HISTORY, Issue 3 2005
Melvyn P. Leffler
First page of article [source]


Middle Powers and American Foreign Policy: Lessons from Irano-U.

POLICY STUDIES JOURNAL, Issue 1 2000

By examining the lessons of Irano-US. relations, the article contends that a post-Cold War American foreign policy relying on middle powers can achieve American security interests while avoiding the potential for excessive entanglements arising from a direct role. The effective implementation of this policy is argued to be consistent with the promotion of regional stability and the diffusion of democracy. [source]


Religion and American Foreign Policy, 1945-60: The Soul of Containment , By William Inboden

RELIGIOUS STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 3 2010
Paul Kahan
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Political Islam and Foreign Policy in Europe and the United States

FOREIGN POLICY ANALYSIS, Issue 4 2007
Elizabeth Shakman Hurd
This paper is about the epistemological underpinnings of European and American foreign policy toward political Islam. European and American approaches to political Islam rely upon commonly held secular assumptions about religion and politics that have significant effects on foreign policy in Europe and the United States. Secularist epistemology produces an understanding of "normal politics" that lends a particular coloring to the politics of Muslim-majority societies. These secularist understandings affect foreign policy in two ways: first, the appearance of Islam in politics is equated with fundamentalism and intolerance, and second, the forms and degrees of separation between Islam and politics that do exist in contemporary Muslim-majority societies either do not appear at all or appear as ill-fitting imitations of a Western secular ideal. Rather than a backlash against modernity or a return to tradition, political Islam is a modern language of politics that challenges and, at times, overturns fundamental assumptions about religion and politics embedded in Western forms of secularism. [source]


Violence in American foreign policy: a psychoanalytic approach

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF APPLIED PSYCHOANALYTIC STUDIES, Issue 4 2009
Frank Summers
First page of article [source]


Teaching Foreign Policy with Memoirs

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PERSPECTIVES, Issue 2 2002
Terry L. Deibel
Excerpts from the memoirs of high foreign policy officials, if carefully selected and structured, can be a valuable resource in the teaching of diplomatic history, American foreign policy, and international relations. Two decades of teaching a memoirs-only course to mid-career military officers and foreign affairs professionals in a seminar discussion format reveals many of their advantages. Memoirs are interesting reading that rarely fail to engage a reader's attention; they impart detailed knowledge of historical events; they provide a rich understanding of process and the neglected area of policy implementation; like case studies, they let students build vicarious experience in policymaking and execution; and they often provide what Alexander George called "policy-relevant generalizations." While lack of objectivity can be a serious drawback of first-person accounts, it provides its own lessons on the nature of history and can be offset by using multiple accounts of the same events and by combining memoirs with documents and historical works, or countering analytical studies. Although picking the most interesting and worthwhile excerpts, getting them in students' hands, and accommodating their length within the boundaries of a standard college course are additional challenges, professors who take them on should find that memoirs add a new level of excitement and realism to their courses. [source]


American Orientalism and American Exceptionalism: A Critical Rethinking of US Hegemony

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 2 2009
Meghana V. Nayak
In this essay, we argue that critical International Relations (IR) scholars must consider American Orientalism in tandem with American Exceptionalism in order to better understand US identity, foreign policymaking, and hegemony. We claim that American Exceptionalism is a particular type of American Orientalism, a style of thought about the distinctions between the "West" and the "East" that gives grounding to the foundational narrative of "America." While Exceptionalism and Orientalism both deploy similar discursive, ontological, and epistemological claims about the "West" and its non-western "Others," Exceptionalism is also rooted specifically in American political thought that developed in contradistinction to Europe. As such, we demonstrate that different logics of othering are at work between the West and the non-West, and among Western powers. We implore critical IR scholars to interrogate how the United States and Europe alternatively collude and clash in wielding normative power over their non-Western Others. We claim such research is important for exploring the staying power of American hegemony and understanding the implications of European challenges to American foreign policy, particularly given recent concerns about a so-called transatlantic divide. [source]


Middle Powers and American Foreign Policy: Lessons from Irano-U.

POLICY STUDIES JOURNAL, Issue 1 2000

By examining the lessons of Irano-US. relations, the article contends that a post-Cold War American foreign policy relying on middle powers can achieve American security interests while avoiding the potential for excessive entanglements arising from a direct role. The effective implementation of this policy is argued to be consistent with the promotion of regional stability and the diffusion of democracy. [source]


The Little State Department: McGeorge Bundy and the National Security Council Staff, 1961-65

PRESIDENTIAL STUDIES QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2001
ANDREW PRESTON
This article examines the alteration of the role, prerogatives, and power of the special assistant to the president for national security affairs, a position more commonly known as the national security adviser. Presidents Truman and Eisenhower conceived of and shaped the National Security Council(NSC) and its staff to be administrative in their responsibilities and character. Under President Kennedy, McGeorge Bundy utterly changed this, concentrating power and decision-making authority in the hands of the special assistant and his NSC staff at the White House. From 1961, the special assistant and NSC staff ceased to be administrators and became policy formulators actively engaged in the policy-making process. This transformation occurred largely at the expense of the State Department and had profound consequences for American foreign policy, particularly toward the conflict in Vietnam. [source]


Frederic Eggleston on International Relations and Australia's Role in the World

AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF POLITICS AND HISTORY, Issue 3 2005
Neville Meaney
Frederic Eggleston was a prominent public intellectual whose reflections on international relations constitute one of the most important records by an Australian liberal thinker during the first half of twentieth century. Eggleston wrote extensively, and hopefully, about the capacity of international organisations to discipline the behaviour of nation-states; but his hopes were tempered in his writing also about the descent to wars, including the early Cold War period in which his support for American foreign policy grew stronger. His liberal outlook was also informed by his sense of Australia's Britishness, Australia's location in the Pacific, and Australia's future relations with Asian countries. [source]