Highest Specific Growth Rate (highest + specific_growth_rate)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Effects of dietary l -carnitine supplements on growth and body composition in beluga sturgeon (Huso huso) juveniles

JOURNAL OF APPLIED ICHTHYOLOGY, Issue 6 2008
M. Mohseni
Summary The effects of dietary l -carnitine on growth performance, whole body composition and feed utilization were studied in beluga, Huso huso. Fish were randomly allocated in 15 tanks (30 fish per tank) and triplicate groups were fed to satiety during 84 days one of five isonitrogenous (41% CP) and isoenergetic (20 MJ kg,1) diets, each differing in l -carnitine content [0 (control), 300, 600, 900 and 1200 mg kg,1 diet]. At the end of the trial, fish grew from 19- to 23-fold in weight, from 8.4 g to a maximum of 191 g. Fish fed 300,600 mg l -carnitine had the highest specific growth rate (SGR, 3.69 and 3.72% day,1) and protein efficiency ratio (PER, 0.95 and 0.99), and the lowest feed conversion ratio (FCR, 1.4 and 1.3) than the other groups (P < 0.0001). SGR, PER and FCR were the poorest for fish fed 1200 mg l -carnitine, while fish fed the unsupplemented and 900 mg l -carnitine supplemented diet showed intermediate performance. Body lipid concentration decreased significantly from 5.8 to 5.1% (P < 0.0001) with dietary l -carnitine supplementation increasing from 0 to 300 mg. Energy content was significantly lower in fish fed the 900 and 1200 mg l -carnitine diet (5.8 MJ kg,1), when compared with the other treatment groups (6.4,6.6 MJ kg,1). The results indicated that feeding sturgeon on diets supplemented with 300 mg l -carnitine kg,1 diet improved growth performance, and stimulated protein-sparing effects from lipids. [source]


Growth and body composition of juvenile white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, fed different ratios of dietary protein to energy

AQUACULTURE NUTRITION, Issue 6 2008
Y. HU
Abstract A 10-week feeding experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of different protein to energy ratios on growth and body composition of juvenile Litopenaeus vannamei (initial average weight of 0.09 0.002 g, mean SE). Twelve practical test diets were formulated to contain four protein levels (300, 340, 380 and 420 g kg,1) and three lipid levels (50, 75 and 100 g kg,1). Each diet was randomly fed to triplicate groups of 30 shrimps per tank (260 L). The water temperature was 28.5 2 C and the salinity was 28 1 g L,1 during the experimental period. The results showed that the growth was significantly (P < 0.05) affected by dietary treatments. Shrimps fed the diets containing 300 g kg,1 protein showed the poorest growth. However, shrimp fed the 75 g kg,1 lipid diets had only slightly higher growth than that fed 50 g kg,1 lipid diets at the same dietary protein level, and even a little decline in growth with the further increase of dietary lipid to 100 g kg,1. Shrimp fed the diet with 420 g kg,1protein and 75 g kg,1 lipid had the highest specific growth rate. However, shrimp fed the diet with 340 g kg,1 protein and 75 g kg,1 lipid showed comparable growth, and had the highest protein efficiency ratio, energy retention and feed efficiency ratio among dietary treatments. Triglycerides and total cholesterol in the serum of shrimp increased with increasing dietary lipid level at the same dietary protein level. Body lipid and energy increased with increasing dietary lipid level irrespective of dietary protein. Results of the present study showed that the diet containing 340 g kg,1 protein and 75 g kg,1 lipid with digestible protein/digestible energy of 21.1 mg kJ,1 is optimum for L. vannamei, and the increase of dietary lipid level has not efficient protein-sparing effect. [source]


Intra-specific effects of sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) with reference to stocking density and body size

AQUACULTURE RESEARCH, Issue 8 2010
Shuanglin Dong
Abstract The present studies deal with the intra-specific effects of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus with unlimited food resources, especially the effects of stocking density on growth variation of the animal and energetic changes of small individuals under the stress of large individuals. The results showed that with the initial body weight of 5.120.09,6.110.26 g of sea cucumber among the densities of 5, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 ind./100 L, the density of 20 ind./100 L was the optimum stocking density because of its highest specific growth rate, crude protein content and crude lipid content in tissue. Individual growth variation of A. japonicus increased with the increase of stocking densities, whereas no significant differences in variation were found when the density was over 30 ind./100 L (P>0.05). The low-weight individuals under the stress of heavy-weight individuals exhibited obvious changes in energetics, such as lower ingestion rate, lower energy deposited as growth but higher respiration and excretion. The coefficient of variation in growth of the animals was over 70% due to the simultaneous action of aggression and maybe a factor of chemical mediator, and led to significant changes in the energetics of small-sized individuals. [source]


Effects of dietary protein to energy ratios on growth and body composition of juvenile Chinese sucker, Myxocyprinus asiaticus

AQUACULTURE NUTRITION, Issue 2 2010
Y.C. YUAN
Abstract A growth experiment was conducted to investigate effect of dietary protein to energy ratios on growth and body composition of juvenile Myxocyprinus asiaticus (initial mean weight: 10.04 0.53 g, mean SD). Nine practical diets were formulated to contain three protein levels (340, 390 and 440 g kg,1), each with three lipid levels (60, 100 and 140 g kg,1), in order to produce a range of P/E ratios (from 22.4 to 32.8 mg protein kJ,1). Each diet was randomly assigned to triplicate groups of 20 fish in 400-L indoors flow-through circular fibre glass tanks provided with sand-filtered aerated freshwater. The results showed that the growth was significantly affected by dietary P/E ratio (P < 0.05). Fish fed the diets with 440 g kg,1 protein (100 and 140 g kg,1 lipid, P/E ratio of 31.43 and 29.22 mg protein kJ,1) had the highest specific growth rates (SGR) (2.16 and 2.27% day,1, respectively). However, fish fed the diet with 390 g kg,1 protein and 140 g kg,1 lipid showed comparable growth (2.01% day,1), and had higher protein efficiency ratio (PER), protein productive value (PPV) and energy retention (ER) than other groups (P < 0.05). No significant differences in survival were found among dietary treatments. Carcass lipid content was positively correlated with dietary lipid level, but irrespective of protein level and inversely correlated with carcass moisture content. Carcass protein contents increased with increasing dietary lipid at each protein level. The white muscle and liver composition showed that lipid increased with increasing dietary lipid level (P < 0.05). Dietary protein concentrations had significant effect on condition factor (CF), hepatosomatic index (HSI) and viscerosomatic index (VSI) (P < 0.05). However, dietary lipid concentrations had no significant effect on CF, HSI (P > 0.05). Based on these observations, 440 g kg,1 protein with lipid from 100 to 140 g kg,1 (P/E ratio of 29.22 to 31.43 mg protein kJ,1) seemed to meet minimum requirement for optimal growth and feed utilization, and lipid could cause protein-sparing effect in diets for juvenile Chinese sucker. [source]