Health Nursing (health + nursing)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Health Nursing

  • community mental health nursing
  • mental health nursing
  • public health nursing

  • Terms modified by Health Nursing

  • health nursing care
  • health nursing education
  • health nursing practice
  • health nursing role
  • health nursing student

  • Selected Abstracts


    Scoping the prospects of Australian mental health nursing

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2000
    Michael Clinton
    ABSTRACT: In March 2000 the Australian & New Zealand College of Mental Health Nurses submitted the final report on the National Scoping Study of Mental Health Nursing in Australia to the Mental Health Branch of the Department of Health and Aged Care. In this final article, in a series of four, the authors present an overview of the future prospects of mental health nursing in Australia. [source]


    Mental Health Nursing: Competencies for Practice

    JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 2 2005
    Megan Edwards RMN BSc PGDip
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Extreme Nursing: Forensic Adolescent Mental Health Nursing in Australia

    JOURNAL OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, Issue 3 2006
    Andrew Cashin RN, Dip App Sci, MANZCMHN
    [source]


    The Vision of Mental Health Nursing in Panama

    JOURNAL OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, Issue 4 2004
    Linda M. Finke PhD
    [source]


    Public Health Nurses and the delivery of quality nursing care in the community

    JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, Issue 10 2008
    DipHE, Trish Markham MSc (Hons)
    Aim., The aim of the study was to explore factors which impact on quality nursing care in the community from the Public Health Nurse's (PHN) perspective. Background., Public Health Nursing has significantly evolved over the past few years with the delivery of quality nursing being a focus point. This study explores factors that impact upon the delivery of quality care in Public Health Nursing in Ireland. The findings provide an opportunity for an additional perspective to be included in the existing international findings and act as a starting point from which further research can be built. Method., A qualitative method using semi-structured interviews were conducted. Interviews were taped and content analysed. Findings., Four main categories emefrged from the data, namely role change, components of quality nursing care, barriers to quality nursing care and the factors that facilitate the delivery of quality nursing care in the community. PHNs strive for evidence-based practice; they acknowledged their inability to achieve this and referred to factors that inhibited them from reaching their goal. Conclusion., Enhanced education for PHNs will equip them in the delivery of a quality service and have a positive impact on patient care. Better communication is required between PHNs, line managers and the multidisciplinary team. The delivery of community services need to be reviewed and developed further in accordance with the health strategy policy. Relevance to clinical practice., This study has identified the evolution in clinical practice associated with the changing role and scope of Public Health Nursing. Clinical practice has evolved over time to incorporate societal change, technological advances and the delivery of an evidence-based service responsive to identified need. This study identified the presence of an increase in the specialist clinical work being undertaken as a result of new technological advances entering the community working environment. [source]


    Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing: Concepts of Care in Evidence-Based Practice

    JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, Issue 8 2008
    Stacey C Wilson
    [source]


    Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing: The Field of Knowledge

    JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, Issue 8 2006
    Declan Patton
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing , The Craft of Caring, Second Edition

    JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC & MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 6 2010
    SUE BARKER rmn bsc msc pg dip (prof. dev.)
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Consumer input into standards revision: changing practice

    JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC & MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 1 2007
    G. BEAL rn phd cpmhn(c)
    As part of ongoing quality improvement initiatives, the Canadian Standards for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing were recently revised. For the first time since the standards were published in 1995, the input of consumers of mental health services was sought. Thirty-one consumers from across Canada participated in focus groups, and answered questions related to the domains of practice as identified in the standards document. Through this input, consumers were able to inform the committee regarding areas of satisfaction and dissatisfaction from their unique perspective. Through this article, the process of consumer collaboration is illustrated in relation to how it shaped Standards revision, and finally how it affected the practitioners involved. [source]


    Mental Health Nursing in 2001: What happens next?

    JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC & MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 6 2001
    Kevin Gournay PROF
    [source]


    Advanced Practice Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing, Finding Our Core: The Therapeutic Relationship in 21st Century

    PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, Issue 4 2006
    Suzanne Perraud RN
    TOPIC.,Increasingly, students from various professional backgrounds are enrolling in Psychiatric Mental Health (PMH) Nursing graduate programs, especially at the post-master's level. Faculty must educate these students to provide increasingly complex care while socializing them as PMH advanced practitioners. PURPOSE.,To present how one online program is addressing these issues by reasserting the centrality of the relationship and by assuring it has at least equal footing with the application of a burgeoning knowledge base of neurobiology of mental illness. SOURCES.,Published literature from nursing and psychology. CONCLUSIONS.,The PMH graduate faculty believes that they have developed strategies to meet this challenge and to help build a PMH workforce that will maintain the centrality of the relationship in PMH practice. [source]


    Nurture: The Fundamental Significance of Relationship as a Paradigm for Mental Health Nursing

    PERSPECTIVES IN PSYCHIATRIC CARE, Issue 3 2003
    Bonnie Raingruber PhD
    TOPIC Whether nature or nurture is the most appropriate paradigm for mental health nursing practice, education, and research. PURPOSE To present detailed information that nurture is the most inclusive and sustaining paradigm for mental health nursing. SOURCES Published literature. CONCLUSIONS Psychological, social, cultural, environmental, biological, and experience-based problems are the root of mental illness. Mental health nursing must have a comprehensive paradigm that honors the relational nature of the nurse-patient relationship, the critical influence of environment, the importance of biological factors, and the way that narrative understanding and history shape behavior. [source]


    Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education for Entry-Level Community/Public Health Nursing

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2010
    Education Committee of the Association of Community Health Nurse Educators
    ABSTRACT Community/public health nursing (C/PHN) educators and practitioners need a framework from which to plan, implement, and evaluate curriculum and community-based practice. The Association of Community Health Nursing Educators (ACHNE) periodically updates the Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education for Entry Level Community/Public Health Nursing to reflect changes in core knowledge, basic competencies, and practice. This update reflects relevance to 21st-century health care and to national trends influencing nursing education. The 2009 revision is based on critical analysis of key C/PHN literature and input from public health nursing educators and practitioners. A key assumption is that a baccalaureate nursing degree is the minimum requirement for professional C/PHN. Fifteen essential concepts for baccalaureate nursing education are delineated along with related competencies. Newly defined essentials include communication, social justice, and emergency preparedness, response, and recovery. Issues related to didactic and clinical experiences are addressed. The ACHNE Essentials is an important guide for baccalaureate education curriculum planning and evaluation. The Essentials may be useful as a baseline from which to develop competencies of graduate nursing programs. The document is also useful for guiding practice setting orientation and professional development. [source]


    The Public Health Nurse and the Emotions of Pregnancy

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 3 2010
    Kent A. Zimmerman
    ABSTRACT The excerpts taken from this historical article by Kent Zimmerman, M.D., a mental health consultant to the California State Department of Health, provide insight about the role of public health nurses in working with pregnant women. Dr. Zimmerman, an expert in the field of the psychological problems of pregnancy and early childhood, was a part of an international group of psychiatric dignitaries who met in 1952 in France at a conference examining the state of psychological knowledge and care of children (Soddy, 1999). In this paper, the psychiatrist addresses the need for education and support in providing mental health services to clients in public health venues, a theme he reiterated in 1952. In this piece, he argued that staff nurses in public health agencies be trained in basics of psychiatry and that specialists be hired to serve as permanent consultants to public health workers to help with the most challenging nurse-client interactions, and with the emotions that accompany difficult interpersonal work. While knowledge has developed a great deal since the publication of this article in February 1947 in Public Health Nursing, readers may be surprised to see that interdisciplinary collaboration and teamwork were ideals more than 50 years ago. [source]


    Friday at Frontier Nursing Service

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2009
    Anna May January
    ABSTRACT The Frontier Nursing Service (FNS) was founded in 1925 in eastern Kentucky by Mary Breckinridge, a nurse whose interest in improving rural health and midwifery changed the course of rural public health nursing and improved health outcomes for some of the most isolated and poorest people in 20th century America. The visual image of Breckinridge on horseback visiting her scattered rural patients is imprinted on the minds of most public health nurses in the United States and has, perhaps, been the wellspring of many nursing career aspirations. The daily life of FNS nurses was one of hardship, uncertainty and variey, as is evidenced in this tale of one day; nonetheless, the experiment of a rural nursing service combining midwifery and generalized nursing was ultimately a tremendous success. The following historical reprint recounts a singular day in the life of Anna January, a nurse midwife at the FNS in Confluence, Kentucky. She captures the dialect and earthiness of the region and the period in her story, but the events she relates also illustrate how interconnected life events can be in rural communities. The original article appeared in the December 1948 issue of Public Health Nursing [Volume 40 (12), 601,602]. [source]


    Future Families and Nurses of the Future as Seen in 1948

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 6 2008
    Sarah E. Abrams
    ABSTRACT On the occasion of the 100th anniversary celebration of the Community Service Society (CSS) of New York, Ruth Weaver Hubbard, president of the National Organization for Public Health Nursing, addressed the audience with a talk about "Nursing for Health in Tomorrow's Family." The full text of her speech was printed in the original Public Health Nursing in June 1948. This article presents excerpts of her forecast of the future of the American family and the role of the nurse in helping to achieve health. Predictions from the past provide an unusual historical perspective, one of peering into a future now some 50 years past. The fabric of life in the United States has changed dramatically since 1948, but Hubbard's opinion that nursing is integral to a team approach to helping individuals and communities address their own needs was articulated with profound conviction. [source]


    The Best of Public Health Nursing, Circa 1941

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 3 2008
    Sarah E. Abrams
    ABSTRACT Public health nursing was the term Lillian Wald used to describe the work of nurses whose role it was to address both the immediate impact of sickness and the underlying relationship between poverty, social disadvantage, environmental hazards, and disease. The nature and content of American public health nursing of the 1930s are reflected in exemplars from Marguerite Wales's 1941 book, The Public Health Nurse in Action. Nurses' roles as educators, caregivers, and case managers overcoming barriers emerge from the tales. These vignettes illustrate the organic relationships that existed between nurses and communities. Nurses' understanding of the nature and influence of environmental, psychological and social factors on health behavior was essential to effective public health work. Their stories help us interpret the meaning of nursing at a moment in time. They also reflect the values of the founders of Henry Street Nursing Service and supervisors of public and voluntary agencies throughout the U.S. and Canada who selected and edited them for instructive purposes. Reading collections of such narratives also helps us to appreciate the difficulty of negotiating complex needs, and may provide greater appreciation for the work of our predecessors as well as our own. [source]


    Edna Dell Weinel, Champion of Public Health Nursing, Excerpts from an Oral History

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2008
    Irene Kalnins
    ABSTRACT Edna Dell Weinel is a former executive director (1980,1991) of the Family Care Center, a federally funded neighborhood health center in St. Louis, Missouri; this position capped her career as a county public health nurse, state maternal-child nursing consultant, and educator. In all her positions, Weinel lived her values: working at one's highest level of skill, social justice, and teamwork, and used political skills to build alliances for the improvement of community health. Her many contributions to public health and public health nursing were recognized by the Public Health Nursing Section of the American Public Health Association in 1993 with the Ruth B. Freeman Distinguished Career award. In interviews conducted early in 2007, Weinel spoke of her pride in being a public health nurse, her unchanging belief that health care can best be delivered by teams, and that public health nurses are an essential part of any effective team. [source]


    Nursing the Community, a Look Back at the 1984 Dialogue Between Virginia A. Henderson and Sherry L. Shamansky

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2007
    Sarah E. Abrams
    ABSTRACT Dr. Sherry L. Shamansky, one of the founding editors of Public Health Nursing, interviewed renowned 20th-century leader, Virginia Avenal Henderson (1897,1996), then research associate emeritus at Yale University School of Nursing, about the nursing of "aggregates." Their discussion, originally published in Public Health Nursing, in 1984 (Vol. 1, No. 4), highlights Henderson's views about the scope of nursing, health care organization and funding, and perceived tension between direct care of the sick in the community and preventive activities directed toward communities or populations at risk. Readers familiar with Henderson's influential definition of nursing may find her responses to interview questions helpful in understanding her view of the opportunities and challenges faced by public or community health nurses of the time. [source]


    Learning to Live with Our Children

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 6 2006
    Henrietta Fleck
    ABSTRACT As the title suggests, being perplexed by one's children is not unique to the 21st century. In her paper, published in the original Public Health Nursing, Henrietta Fleck (1949), chair of Home Economics at New York University, addressed this persistent problem by providing advice on parent education methods for public health nurses. The materials,films, newspapers, cartoons, posters,are all within the nurse's arsenal today, supplemented by television, and the Internet. More interesting was Fleck's philosophy about parenting and family life. The excerpt omits the dated description of resources, focusing instead on her point of view. It reflects post-World War II optimism about the meaning and power of democracy in shaping familial behavior. The United States was readjusting to civilian life following World War II, fathers were returning home from military fields of action overseas, women were gradually being displaced from the industrial workplace,the country was expanding into suburbia and baby boomers were making their first appearances in the world. Fleck's assumptions include belief in the value of individualism, the importance of sharing both privilege and obligation, and the nature of maturity evidenced in an ability to make reasoned and reasonable choices and to hold oneself accountable for them. The limitations of her view are left to us to ponder. [source]


    Public Health Nursing in Latin America

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2006
    Hazel O'Hara
    ABSTRACT This reprint of excerpts from an article printed in Public Health Nursing in February 1950 by Hazel O'Hara, a staff writer for the Institute of Inter-American Affairs, describes the state of public health nursing in clinics operated under the cooperative health programs of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs, in conjunction with governmental entities in Latin American countries and the United States federal government in the mid-20th century. The Institute of Inter-American Affairs was an important element of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Good Neighbor" policy toward Latin America. Conceived by Nelson Rockefeller, Assistant Secretary of State in the Roosevelt administration, the program was delayed by the outbreak of World War II (NLM, 2005, June 22). O'Hara's colorful descriptions of jungle residents and poor residents of urban slums have been omitted because they reflect a past time and sensibility. The remaining information, however, is significant in understanding the development of public health nursing in countries where it had not previously existed, the expansion of the nursing workforce, and the creation of health centers that served communities to improve social conditions as well as health status. [source]


    Matching a Graduate Curriculum in Public/Community Health Nursing to Practice Competencies: The Rush University Experience

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2006
    R.N.C., Susan Swider Ph.D.
    ABSTRACT An evidence-based approach to Public/Community Health Nursing (P/CHN) requires that P/CHN educators prepare practitioners with the relevant skills, attitudes, and knowledge. Such education should be competency-based and have measurable outcomes to demonstrate student preparation. In 2003, the Quad Council competencies were developed to be applied at two levels of public health nursing practice: the staff nurse/generalist role and the manager/specialist/consultant role. This paper describes a process for evaluation and revision of a graduate curriculum to prepare Advanced Practice Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS) in P/CHN, to ensure that the educational program addresses and develops knowledge and proficiency in all relevant competencies. This paper documents the process of integrating the competencies throughout the P/CHN graduate curriculum at varying levels, guiding students to achieve proficiency in each competency by the end of the program. Measurement of achievement in these competencies will be discussed, and examples provided. Advanced Practice Public Health Nurses educated via this competency-based approach will be prepared to sit for national certification as a CNS in Public/Community Health, and to assume leadership roles in public health nursing. [source]


    From Narrow to Novice in Environmental Health Nursing

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2005
    Judith C. Hays
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Changing Times, Changing Needs, Changing Programs

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 3 2005
    Article first published online: 24 JUN 200
    EDITOR's NOTE, The following reprint of the unsigned editorial for the April 1952 issue of Public Health Nursing describes the historical needs and the continuing development of school health nursing from the early to mid-20th century. Twenty-first century schools continue to deal with some of the same issues such as hunger, poor nutrition, and the adverse effects of overly burdensome work schedules on adolescent health and mental well-being. The goal, so optimistically anticipated by the editors of Public Health Nursing in 1952, of continuous, well-coordinated health supervision from birth to maturity continues to elude us. Of course, school nurses and other health personnel address problems not openly discussed in the 1950s,substance abuse, violence, sexually transmitted diseases, and teen pregnancy. The theme of this historical editorial is the power of advocacy,and the responsibility public health nurses have to use our talents to improve child health. [source]


    From Miasma to Fractals: The Epidemiology Revolution and Public Health Nursing

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2004
    Marjorie A. MacDonald Ph.D.
    Abstract If public health nursing is truly a synthesis of public health science and nursing science, then nurses must keep track of current developments in public health science. Unfortunately, the public health nursing literature has not kept pace with revolutionary developments in epidemiology, one of the sciences that informs population-focused nursing practice. Most epidemiology chapters in community health nursing texts do not reflect the intellectual development that has taken place in epidemiology over the past two decades. The purpose of this article therefore is to facilitate an updated synthesis by (a) reviewing the development of epidemiology and the focus of public health nursing practice through three historical eras, (b) discussing current controversies and tensions within epidemiology, (c) introducing an emerging paradigm in epidemiology based on an ecosocial perspective, and (d) discussing the congruence of this perspective with the evolving theory and practice of public health nursing. [source]


    Integrating Research into Teaching Public Health Nursing

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2004
    F.A.A.N., Naomi E. Ervin Ph.D.
    Abstract Integration of research into teaching provides an environment for students to not only learn how research is conducted but also experience how research contributes to improving practice and client outcomes. Integrating research into teaching is important because of the need to build evidence for public health nursing practice. This article describes an innovative approach by faculty to integrate research into teaching undergraduate and graduate public health nursing courses. This approach was developed using the Mexican-American Problem Solving research study. The purpose of the Mexican-American Problem Solving study was to develop, test, and refine a home- and school-based nursing intervention to improve family functioning, children's health conceptions, self-esteem, and mental health. Students were involved in all aspects of the study, including focus group sessions, instrument translation, data collection, intervention implementation, and dissemination of the results. The authors describe these activities and provide recommendations for successfully involving students in faculty research. [source]


    Getting Your Feet Wet: Becoming a Public Health Nurse, Part 1

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 1 2004
    D.N.Sc., Lee SmithBattle R.N.
    Abstract While the competencies and theory relevant to public health nursing (PHN) practice continue to be described, much less attention has been given to the knowledge derived from practice (clinical know-how) and the development of PHN expertise. A study was designed to address this gap by recruiting nurses with varied levels of experience and from various practice sites. A convenience sample of 28 public health nurses and seven administrators/supervisors were interviewed. A subsample, comprised of less-experienced public health nurses, were followed longitudinally over an 18-month period. Data included more than 130 clinical episodes and approximately 900 pages of transcripts and field notes. A series of interpretive sessions focused on identifying salient aspects of the text and comparing and contrasting what showed up as compelling, puzzling, and meaningful in public health nurses' descriptions. This interpretive analysis revealed changes in understanding of practice and captured the development of clinical know-how. In Part 1, we describe the sample, study design, and two aspects of clinical knowledge development,grappling with the unfamiliar and learning relational skills,that surfaced in nurses' descriptions of early clinical practice. In Part 2, which is to be published in the next issue of Public Health Nursing (SmithBattle, Diekemper, & Leander, 2004), we explore gradual shifts in public health nurses' understanding of practice that led to their engagement in upstream, population-focused activities. Implications of these findings for supporting the clinical learning of public health nurses and the development of expertise are described. [source]


    Twenty Years of Public Health Nursing: Part 2.

    PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 6 2003
    Looking Ahead
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    The differences and commonalities between United Kingdom and Canadian Psychiatric/Mental Health nursing: a personal reflection

    JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC & MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 3 2003
    Associate Professor, JOHN R. CUTCLIFFE Chair of Nursing
    [source]


    Ordinary people, extraordinary voices: The emotional labour of lay people caring for and about people with a mental health problem

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 5 2010
    Christine Hogg
    ABSTRACT Many attempts to reduce the stigmatization of people with mental illness have often been predicated, based on the desire to persuade the public that people with mental illness are ,ill' in the same way as people with medical conditions. This paper presents one aspect from the findings of a study that examined the ways in which lay people perceived mental health and illness. Data are drawn from the discussion of the roles and experiences of different non-mental health professionals who cared for and about people they met in their everyday employment. In this paper, we argue that central to these roles is the importance of listening to people in an arena which is non-statutory and without judgment. We demonstrate that people use popular sectors when they are unsure of the problem they have, or they are reluctant to refer themselves to the professional sector. The paper presents narrative extracts illustrating the emotional labour operating in each participant's role and the extent to which they provide support for their client's emotional and psychological well-being. The implications for mental health nursing are discussed in relation to working with and alongside people experiencing mental distress, in relation to ,ordinary human qualities'. [source]