Health Care Industry (health + care_industry)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Injured Workers' Underreporting in the Health Care Industry: An Analysis Using Quantitative, Qualitative, and Observational Data

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, Issue 1 2010
MONICA GALIZZI
Underreporting of occupational injuries was examined in four health care facilities using quantitative, qualitative, and observational data. Occupational Safety and Health Administration logs accounted for only one-third of the workers' compensation records; 45 percent of injured workers followed by survey had workers' compensation claims. Workers reported 63 percent of serious occupational injuries. Underreporting is explained by time pressure and workers' doubts about eligibility, reputation, income loss, and career prospects. Though aware of underreporting, managers subtly believe in workers' moral hazard behaviors. [source]


Do competition and managed care improve quality?

HEALTH ECONOMICS, Issue 7 2002
Nazmi SariArticle first published online: 22 JUL 200
Abstract In recent years, the US health care industry has experienced a rapid growth of managed care, formation of networks, and an integration of hospitals. This paper provides new insights about the quality consequences of this dynamic in US hospital markets. I empirically investigate the impact of managed care and hospital competition on quality using in-hospital complications as quality measures. I use random and fixed effects, and instrumental variable fixed effect models using hospital panel data from up to 16 states in the 1992,1997 period. The paper has two important findings: First, higher managed care penetration increases the quality, when inappropriate utilization, wound infections and adverse/iatrogenic complications are used as quality indicators. For other complication categories, coefficient estimates are statistically insignificant. These findings do not support the straightforward view that increases in managed care penetration are associated with decreases in quality. Second, both higher hospital market share and market concentration are associated with lower quality of care. Hospital mergers have undesirable quality consequences. Appropriate antitrust policies towards mergers should consider not only price and cost but also quality impacts. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Attrition in nursing among Black and White nurses

JOURNAL OF NURSING MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2007
STEVEN A. SMITH PhD
Fundamental to dealing with the problems associated with attracting and retaining nurses during a tight labour market are issues centreing upon attrition from the field. In the United States, attrition has become such a significant issue that efforts to attract individuals to the field and recruit them to positions in the health care industry are not adequate to offset the flow of individuals from the field, much less bring in the additional nurses who are needed for an ageing population with increasing health care needs. As an example of the seriousness of the problem, it is probably safe to say that of the students who graduate from nursing schools each year and who enter the field of nursing, a significant number will no longer be practicing after 5 years in the profession. In a high attrition environment, even if many individuals were entering nursing, these losses will potentially offset any gains that are made. From the perspective of this study, it is important to know what is leading nurses to leave their careers. Do all nurses face the same challenges in the course of their careers, or is the pattern of turnover somewhat different for different groups of nurses or those in different stages of their careers? In this study, we consider what career differences may exist between the two major groups of nurses in the USA today , Black and White nurses , and ask whether there are differences between the two groups in terms of ,whether' and ,why' they may be leaving the field. Our primary purpose was to determine if differences in attrition exist between Black and White nurses, and if so, where in the career process are those differences most pronounced. Based on our analysis of data from the National Science Foundation, we do find significant differences in patterns of attrition for the two groups and we suggest what we believe may be their implications for policy. [source]


On the business value and technical challenges of adopting Web services

JOURNAL OF SOFTWARE MAINTENANCE AND EVOLUTION: RESEARCH AND PRACTICE, Issue 1-2 2004
S. Tilley
Abstract This paper provides a balanced perspective of the business value and technical challenges of adopting Web services. Technology adoption is a continual challenge for both tool developers and enterprise users. Web services are a prime example of an emerging technology that is fraught with adoption issues. Part of the problem is separating marketing hype from business reality. Web services are network-accessible interfaces to application functionality. They are built using Internet technologies such as XML and standard protocols such as SOAP. The adoption issues related to Web services are complex and multifaceted. For example, determining whether this technology is a fundamental advance, rather than something old under a new name, requires technical depth, business acumen, and considerable historical knowledge of past developments. A sample problem from the health care industry is used to illustrate some of the adoption issues. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


AN INVESTIGATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SAFETY CLIMATE AND MEDICATION ERRORS AS WELL AS OTHER NURSE AND PATIENT OUTCOMES

PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 4 2006
DAVID A. HOFMANN
Safety climate has been shown to be associated with a number of important organizational outcomes. In this study, we take a broad view of safety climate,one that includes not only the development and adherence to safety protocols, but also open and constructive responses to errors,and investigate correlates within the health care industry. Drawing on a random, national sample of hospitals, the results revealed that safety climate predicted medication errors, nurse back injuries, urinary tract infections, patient satisfaction, patient perceptions of nurse responsiveness, and nurse satisfaction. As hypothesized, the relationship between safety climate and both medication errors and back injuries was moderated by the complexity of the patient conditions on the unit. Specifically, the effect of the overall safety climate of the unit was accentuated when dealing with more complex patient conditions. [source]


Private Gain and Public Pain: Financing American Health Care

THE JOURNAL OF LAW, MEDICINE & ETHICS, Issue 4 2008
Bruce Siegel
Health care spending comprises about 16% of the total United States gross domestic product and continues to rise. This article examines patterns of health care spending and the factors underlying their proportional growth. We examine the "usual suspects" most frequently cited as drivers of health care costs and explain why these may not be as important as they seem. We suggest that the drive for technological advancement, coupled with the entrepreneurial nature of the health care industry, has produced inherently inequitable and unsustainable health care expenditure and growth patterns. Successful health reform will need to address these factors and their consequences. [source]


Forecasting Daily Patient Volumes in the Emergency Department

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 2 2008
Spencer S. Jones MStat
Abstract Background:, Shifts in the supply of and demand for emergency department (ED) resources make the efficient allocation of ED resources increasingly important. Forecasting is a vital activity that guides decision-making in many areas of economic, industrial, and scientific planning, but has gained little traction in the health care industry. There are few studies that explore the use of forecasting methods to predict patient volumes in the ED. Objectives:, The goals of this study are to explore and evaluate the use of several statistical forecasting methods to predict daily ED patient volumes at three diverse hospital EDs and to compare the accuracy of these methods to the accuracy of a previously proposed forecasting method. Methods:, Daily patient arrivals at three hospital EDs were collected for the period January 1, 2005, through March 31, 2007. The authors evaluated the use of seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average, time series regression, exponential smoothing, and artificial neural network models to forecast daily patient volumes at each facility. Forecasts were made for horizons ranging from 1 to 30 days in advance. The forecast accuracy achieved by the various forecasting methods was compared to the forecast accuracy achieved when using a benchmark forecasting method already available in the emergency medicine literature. Results:, All time series methods considered in this analysis provided improved in-sample model goodness of fit. However, postsample analysis revealed that time series regression models that augment linear regression models by accounting for serial autocorrelation offered only small improvements in terms of postsample forecast accuracy, relative to multiple linear regression models, while seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average, exponential smoothing, and artificial neural network forecasting models did not provide consistently accurate forecasts of daily ED volumes. Conclusions:, This study confirms the widely held belief that daily demand for ED services is characterized by seasonal and weekly patterns. The authors compared several time series forecasting methods to a benchmark multiple linear regression model. The results suggest that the existing methodology proposed in the literature, multiple linear regression based on calendar variables, is a reasonable approach to forecasting daily patient volumes in the ED. However, the authors conclude that regression-based models that incorporate calendar variables, account for site-specific special-day effects, and allow for residual autocorrelation provide a more appropriate, informative, and consistently accurate approach to forecasting daily ED patient volumes. [source]


The economic burden of heart failure

CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY, Issue S3 2000
J. B. O'Connell M.D.
Abstract Heart failure, a major cause of morbidity and mortality among the elderly, is a serious public health problem. As the population ages and the prevalence of heart failure increases, expenditures related to the care of these patients will climb dramatically. As a result, the health care industry must develop strategies to contain this staggering economic burden. Strategies may include adopting approaches for preventing heart failure and implementing new treatment modalities with proven efficacy into large-scale clinical practice. Successful implementation of these strategies will require intensive physician and patient education and development of innovative approaches to fund support services. [source]


Practice-based commissioning in type 2 diabetes management: a successful joint health care practice/industry working model

PRACTICAL DIABETES INTERNATIONAL (INCORPORATING CARDIABETES), Issue 6 2009
M Davis General Practitioner
No abstract is available for this article. [source]