Heel Stick (heel + stick)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Variability in pain response to a non-pharmacological intervention across repeated routine pain exposure in preterm infants: a feasibility study

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 5 2009
E Cignacco
Abstract Aim: To explore the variability in pain response in preterm infants across time who received sucrose during routine heel stick. Method: Single group, exploratory repeated measures design. Setting: Two tertiary level neonatal intensive care units (NICU) in Switzerland. Subjects: Nine preterm infants born between 28 2/7 and 31 4/7 weeks of gestation during their first 14 days of life. Measurements: Pain was assessed by the Bernese Pain Scale for Neonates (BPSN), the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Salivary cortisol was analysed. Results: 72,94% of the variability was within-subject variability, indicating inconsistency of pain responses across the 5 heel sticks. Interrater agreement was highest during heel sticks 1,3 and decreased during heel stick 4 and 5, indicating a possible alteration of pain patterns. No significant differences in the amount of cortisol could be detected before and after the heel sticks (p = 0.55), indicating no stress-induced peak after the painful intervention. However, a general gradual decrease of cortisol levels across time could be detected. Conclusion: A high variability in pain response among preterm neonates across time could be described. Consistency of cortisol levels before and after the heel sticks could indicate the effectiveness of sucrose across time. [source]


Three Infant Care Interventions: Reconsidering the Evidence

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRIC, GYNECOLOGIC & NEONATAL NURSING, Issue 5 2002
Jennifer M. Medves RN
Newborn care in the first 24 hours of life has been based on tradition for many years. Nurses recognize that many practices are not based on good scientific evidence and are not individualized. Instead, all newborns are treated as though they acquire potential pathogens during birth and are oblivious to noxious interventions such as intramuscular injections and heel sticks. In this article, obtaining blood samples from heel sticks and administering vitamin K and prophylaxis for ophthalmia neonatorum are presented as practices that require scrutiny by nurses to promote evidence-based care of newborns in the 1st day of life. [source]


Variability in pain response to a non-pharmacological intervention across repeated routine pain exposure in preterm infants: a feasibility study

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 5 2009
E Cignacco
Abstract Aim: To explore the variability in pain response in preterm infants across time who received sucrose during routine heel stick. Method: Single group, exploratory repeated measures design. Setting: Two tertiary level neonatal intensive care units (NICU) in Switzerland. Subjects: Nine preterm infants born between 28 2/7 and 31 4/7 weeks of gestation during their first 14 days of life. Measurements: Pain was assessed by the Bernese Pain Scale for Neonates (BPSN), the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Salivary cortisol was analysed. Results: 72,94% of the variability was within-subject variability, indicating inconsistency of pain responses across the 5 heel sticks. Interrater agreement was highest during heel sticks 1,3 and decreased during heel stick 4 and 5, indicating a possible alteration of pain patterns. No significant differences in the amount of cortisol could be detected before and after the heel sticks (p = 0.55), indicating no stress-induced peak after the painful intervention. However, a general gradual decrease of cortisol levels across time could be detected. Conclusion: A high variability in pain response among preterm neonates across time could be described. Consistency of cortisol levels before and after the heel sticks could indicate the effectiveness of sucrose across time. [source]