Heel Pain (heel + pain)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Diagnosis and Treatment of Heel Pain

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NURSE PRACTITIONERS, Issue 11 2003
ANP-C, FAANP, Mary Jo Goolsby EdD
The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAC) clinical practice guideline (CPG) summarizes the literature on the assessment and diagnosis of heel pain. The framework classifies heel pain depending on whether the cause is mechanical, neurological, arthritic, traumatic, or from another origin. Treatment strategies are included for the most common form of heel pain that are caused by mechanical problems. [source]


Plantar fasciitis treated with local steroid injection: comparison between sonographic and palpation guidance

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL ULTRASOUND, Issue 1 2006
Wen-Chung Tsai MD
Abstract Purpose To compare the effectiveness of sonographically guided and palpation-guided steroid injection for the treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis. Patients and Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients with unilateral proximal plantar fasciitis were recruited and randomly divided into a sonographically guided group (n = 12) and palpation-guided group (n = 13). Proximal plantar fascia was assessed with a 5- to 12-MHz linear-array transducer. Pain intensity was quantified using a "tenderness threshold" (TT) and a visual analog scale (VAS). Injection of 7 mg (1 ml) of betamethasone and 0.5 ml of 1% lidocaine into the inflamed proximal plantar fascia was performed under the guidance of sonography or palpation. Patients were evaluated clinically and sonographically before injection and at 2 weeks, 2 months, and 1 year after injection. VAS- and TT-measured pain intensity, thickness, and echogenicity of the proximal plantar fascia, as well as the recurrence of heel pain, were assessed. Results Both VAS- and TT-measured levels of pain improved significantly after steroid injection in both groups (p < 0.001). Also, the thickness decreased significantly after injection (p < 0.01 in the palpation-guided group; p < 0.001 in the sonographically guided group). The number of patients with hypoechogenicity at the proximal plantar fascia decreased after steroid injection in both groups (p < 0.01 for both groups). The recurrence rate of plantar fasciitis in patients of the palpation-guided group (6/13) was significantly higher than that of the sonographically guided group (1/12) (p < 0.05). Conclusions Steroid injection can be an effective way to treat plantar fasciitis, and injection under sonographic guidance is associated with lower recurrence of heel pain. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound34:12,16, 2006 [source]


Diagnosis and Treatment of Heel Pain

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NURSE PRACTITIONERS, Issue 11 2003
ANP-C, FAANP, Mary Jo Goolsby EdD
The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAC) clinical practice guideline (CPG) summarizes the literature on the assessment and diagnosis of heel pain. The framework classifies heel pain depending on whether the cause is mechanical, neurological, arthritic, traumatic, or from another origin. Treatment strategies are included for the most common form of heel pain that are caused by mechanical problems. [source]


Technique for determining when plantar heel pain can be neural in origin

MICROSURGERY, Issue 6 2008
A. Lee Dellon M.D., Ph.D.
The surgeon doing microsurgery will encounter problems related to the heel not only in terms of how to reinnervate the transferred tissue, but also in patients presenting with heel pain. While most heel pain is thought to be related to the plantar fascia arising from the calcaneus, conceptually heel pain can be of neural origin. The technique for documenting sensibility in the heel is described using the Pressure-Specified Sensory Device‘. Knowledge of calcaneal nerve sensibility can determine whether there is sufficient sensation to prevent ulceration, whether there is a nerve entrapment that would benefit from neurolysis, or whether there is a neuroma that would benefit from resection. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery, 2008. [source]


Refractory inflammatory heel pain in spondylarthropathy: A significant response to infliximab documented by ultrasound

ARTHRITIS & RHEUMATISM, Issue 3 2002
Maria Antonietta D'Agostino MD
No abstract is available for this article. [source]