Green Revolution (green + revolution)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


LESSONS FROM THREE DECADES OF GREEN REVOLUTION IN THE PHILIPPINES

THE DEVELOPING ECONOMIES, Issue 2 2006
Jonna P. ESTUDILLO
O13; O33; O53 The purpose of the current paper is to assess the changing contributions of successive generations of modern varieties of rice (MV) to yield increase and stability and the changes in total factor productivity (TFP) in irrigated, rainfed, and upland ecosystems in the Philippines. We found that the yield increase in irrigated ecosystem has been by far the highest, which can be attributed to the diffusion of pest- and disease-resistant MV. The contribution of MV to yield increase in the rainfed ecosystem has been less significant, but much more compared with that of upland ecosystem. The rainfed and upland ecosystems have experienced an upward trend in yield, albeit slowly, because of the diffusion of improved traditional varieties and MV suitable to adverse production environments. The contribution of MV cum irrigation has accounted for approximately 50% of the growth of TFP in Central Luzon. [source]


THE IMPACT OF GREEN REVOLUTION ON RICE PRODUCTION IN VIETNAM

THE DEVELOPING ECONOMIES, Issue 2 2006
TRAN Thi Ut
Q16; O13; O33 The current paper reviewed the development of the Green Revolution in Vietnam, using long-term regional yield and modern variety adoption statistics, as well as household data collected in 1996 and 2003. The present study indicates that the Green Revolution began in irrigated favorable areas and spread to the less favorable areas in Vietnam such as in other Asian countries. What is unique in Vietnam is that although the Green Revolution ended in the mid-1980s in the Philippines and Indonesia, it has still been sustained as of 2003. Our analyses revealed that such growth had been supported by continuous improvements of modern varieties by regional research institutes. The varieties imported from China have contributed to the Green Revolution in northern Vietnam and those developed by the International Rice Research Institute in southern Vietnam. The national agricultural research systems have also played a critically important role in developing location-specific and appropriate technologies. [source]


The African Food Crisis: Lessons from the Asian Green Revolution by Göran Djurfeldt, Hans Holmén, Magnus Jirström and Rolf Larsson

DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE, Issue 2 2008
Jan Kees Van Donge
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Introduction to the special issue on the role of nonfarm income in poverty reduction: evidence from Asia and East Africa

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, Issue 2006
Keijiro Otsuka
Abstract In this special issue, we present seven studies that collectively attempt to investigate the role of non-farm income in long-term and short-term poverty reduction in Asia and Africa. The first four studies out of the seven use long-term panel data over two decades in the Philippines, Thailand, Bangladesh, and India. These studies show drastic increases in non-farm income shares and corresponding declines in poverty levels over time, especially in the Philippines and Thailand. Education levels of household members and returns to education also increased significantly in these countries. The remaining three studies use cross-sectional and short-term panel data from Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda. These African studies show high proportions of poor households and low shares of non-farm income that are somewhat comparable to the situation in the 1980s described in the Asian studies. Without the Green Revolution that provided stable farm income and potential financial resources to invest in children' education in Asia, it is not clear if African farm households can follow the Asian examples. [source]


The Green Revolution, development of labor markets, and poverty reduction in the rural Philippines, 1985,2004

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, Issue 2006
Jonna P. Estudillo
Poverty; Landlessness; Green Revolution; Investments in schooling Abstract Using a long-term household panel data set collected in three rural villages in the Philippines in 1985 and 2004, this article explores how the Green Revolution and development of the labor markets have affected household income and poverty situation. The initial rise in income associated with the Green Revolution and a stronger credit access has enabled the households to allocate funds for investing in children's schooling. With the increased integration of the rural with the urban labor market, these children are able to explore labor opportunities in the nonfarm sector that resulted in a decline in poverty by about one-half. The landless households, who are less educated, benefited, too, from the expansion of the nonfarm labor market, because of the rise in rural wages associated with the rise in demand for the unskilled labor, which is by far their most important asset. [source]


THE IMPACT OF GREEN REVOLUTION ON RICE PRODUCTION IN VIETNAM

THE DEVELOPING ECONOMIES, Issue 2 2006
TRAN Thi Ut
Q16; O13; O33 The current paper reviewed the development of the Green Revolution in Vietnam, using long-term regional yield and modern variety adoption statistics, as well as household data collected in 1996 and 2003. The present study indicates that the Green Revolution began in irrigated favorable areas and spread to the less favorable areas in Vietnam such as in other Asian countries. What is unique in Vietnam is that although the Green Revolution ended in the mid-1980s in the Philippines and Indonesia, it has still been sustained as of 2003. Our analyses revealed that such growth had been supported by continuous improvements of modern varieties by regional research institutes. The varieties imported from China have contributed to the Green Revolution in northern Vietnam and those developed by the International Rice Research Institute in southern Vietnam. The national agricultural research systems have also played a critically important role in developing location-specific and appropriate technologies. [source]


The increasing importance of nonfarm income and the changing use of labor and capital in rice farming: the case of Central Luzon, 1979,2003

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS, Issue 2 2009
Kazushi Takahashi
Green revolution; Nonfarm employment; Factor use; The Philippines Abstract There have been sharp increases in nonfarm income among farm households in Central Luzon for the last few decades. This study attempts to identify the effects of the increasing nonfarm income on the use of tractors and threshers and on the employment of hired labor as a substitute for family labor. We found that while the increased nonfarm income positively affects the ownership of tractors, it has no significant impact on the use of agricultural machines due presumably to the development of efficient machine rental markets. We also found that the increased nonfarm income leads to the increased use of hired labor, thereby releasing family labor to nonfarm jobs. [source]