Good Death (good + death)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Confronting the "Good Death": Nazi Euthanasia on Trial, 1945,1953 , By Michael S. Bryant

THE HISTORIAN, Issue 4 2007
Larry Thornton
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Good Deaths, Bad Deaths, and Preferences for the End of Life: A Qualitative Study of Geriatric Outpatients

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 9 2002
Elizabeth K. Vig MD
OBJECTIVES: Patient involvement in decision-making has been advocated to improve the quality of life at the end of life. Although the size of the oldest segment of the population is growing, with greater numbers of older adults facing the end of life, little is known about their preferences for the end of life. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of older adults with medical illness about the end of life, and to investigate whether current values could be extended to end-of-life preferences. DESIGN: Descriptive study with interviews using open- and closed-ended questions. SETTING: Patients attending two university-affiliated geriatric clinics were interviewed in a private conference room near the clinic they attended or in their homes. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen older men and women identified by their physicians as having nonterminal heart disease or cancer. MEASUREMENTS: The interview contained open-ended questions such as: "What are the most important things in your life right now?" and "What would you consider a good/bad death?" The interview also contained closed-ended questions about symptoms, quality of life, and health status. Additional questions elicited preferences for the end of life, such as location of death and the presence of others. The open-ended questions were tape-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods. The closed-ended questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Patients with heart disease and cancer provided similar responses. Participants' views about good deaths, bad deaths, and end-of-life scenarios were heterogeneous. Each participant voiced a unique combination of themes in describing good and bad deaths. Because each participant described a multifaceted view of a good death, for instance, no theme was mentioned by even half of the participants. Participants provided differing explanations for why given themes contributed to good deaths. Currently valued aspects of life were not easily translated into end-of-life preferences. For example, although the majority of participants identified their family as being important, many gave reasons why they did not want their family members present when they died. CONCLUSIONS: Because of the heterogeneity of views and the difficulty in inferring end-of-life preferences from current values, older adults should be asked not only questions about general values, but also specific questions about their end-of-life choices and the reasons for these choices. A thorough understanding of an individual's end-of-life preferences may help health professionals working with older adults develop patient-centered care plans for the end of life. [source]


End-stage chronic liver disease: Time to define a good death,

HEPATOLOGY, Issue 6 2008
John Iredale
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Good Deaths, Bad Deaths, and Preferences for the End of Life: A Qualitative Study of Geriatric Outpatients

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 9 2002
Elizabeth K. Vig MD
OBJECTIVES: Patient involvement in decision-making has been advocated to improve the quality of life at the end of life. Although the size of the oldest segment of the population is growing, with greater numbers of older adults facing the end of life, little is known about their preferences for the end of life. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of older adults with medical illness about the end of life, and to investigate whether current values could be extended to end-of-life preferences. DESIGN: Descriptive study with interviews using open- and closed-ended questions. SETTING: Patients attending two university-affiliated geriatric clinics were interviewed in a private conference room near the clinic they attended or in their homes. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen older men and women identified by their physicians as having nonterminal heart disease or cancer. MEASUREMENTS: The interview contained open-ended questions such as: "What are the most important things in your life right now?" and "What would you consider a good/bad death?" The interview also contained closed-ended questions about symptoms, quality of life, and health status. Additional questions elicited preferences for the end of life, such as location of death and the presence of others. The open-ended questions were tape-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods. The closed-ended questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Patients with heart disease and cancer provided similar responses. Participants' views about good deaths, bad deaths, and end-of-life scenarios were heterogeneous. Each participant voiced a unique combination of themes in describing good and bad deaths. Because each participant described a multifaceted view of a good death, for instance, no theme was mentioned by even half of the participants. Participants provided differing explanations for why given themes contributed to good deaths. Currently valued aspects of life were not easily translated into end-of-life preferences. For example, although the majority of participants identified their family as being important, many gave reasons why they did not want their family members present when they died. CONCLUSIONS: Because of the heterogeneity of views and the difficulty in inferring end-of-life preferences from current values, older adults should be asked not only questions about general values, but also specific questions about their end-of-life choices and the reasons for these choices. A thorough understanding of an individual's end-of-life preferences may help health professionals working with older adults develop patient-centered care plans for the end of life. [source]


Working toward consensus: Providers' strategies to shift patients from curative to palliative treatment choices

RESEARCH IN NURSING & HEALTH, Issue 4 2001
Sally A. Norton
Abstract End-of-life decision making is a complex phenomenon and providers, patients, and families often have different views about the appropriateness of treatment choices. The results presented here are part of a larger grounded-theory study of reconciling decisions near the end of life. In particular, we examined how providers (N,=,15) worked near the end of patients' lives toward changing the treatment decisions of patients and families from those decisions that providers described as unrealistic (i.e., curative) to those that providers described as more realistic (i.e., palliative). According to providers, shifting patients' and families' choices from curative to palliative was usually accomplished by changing patients' and families' understanding of the patient's overall "big picture" to one that was consistent with the providers' understanding. Until patients and families shifted their understanding of the patient's condition,the big picture,they continued to make what providers judged as unrealistic treatment choices based on an inaccurate understanding of what was really going on. These unrealistic choices often precluded possibilities for a "good death." According to providers, the purpose of attempting to shift the patient or proxy's goals was that realistic goals lead to realistic palliative treatment choices that providers associated with a good death. In this article we review strategies used by providers when they believed a patient's death was imminent to attempt to shift patients' and families' understandings of the big picture, thus ultimately shifting their treatment decisions. 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Res Nurs Health 24:258,269, 2001 [source]


The development and implementation of the Pathway for Improving the Care of the Dying in general medical wards

INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, Issue 10 2009
K. Jackson
Abstract The majority of deaths in Australia occur in general hospital wards and most are neither sudden nor unexpected. The Pathway for Improving the Care of the Dying (PICD) is an adaptation of the Liverpool Care Pathway to the Australian healthcare setting (or ,to Australian conditions') and is designed to help ensure a ,good death' for patients dying outside the palliative care system. PICD consists of a series of prompts, guidelines, revised medical and nursing care plans and a number of medication algorithms. [source]


Good Deaths, Bad Deaths, and Preferences for the End of Life: A Qualitative Study of Geriatric Outpatients

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 9 2002
Elizabeth K. Vig MD
OBJECTIVES: Patient involvement in decision-making has been advocated to improve the quality of life at the end of life. Although the size of the oldest segment of the population is growing, with greater numbers of older adults facing the end of life, little is known about their preferences for the end of life. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of older adults with medical illness about the end of life, and to investigate whether current values could be extended to end-of-life preferences. DESIGN: Descriptive study with interviews using open- and closed-ended questions. SETTING: Patients attending two university-affiliated geriatric clinics were interviewed in a private conference room near the clinic they attended or in their homes. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen older men and women identified by their physicians as having nonterminal heart disease or cancer. MEASUREMENTS: The interview contained open-ended questions such as: "What are the most important things in your life right now?" and "What would you consider a good/bad death?" The interview also contained closed-ended questions about symptoms, quality of life, and health status. Additional questions elicited preferences for the end of life, such as location of death and the presence of others. The open-ended questions were tape-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods. The closed-ended questions were analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Patients with heart disease and cancer provided similar responses. Participants' views about good deaths, bad deaths, and end-of-life scenarios were heterogeneous. Each participant voiced a unique combination of themes in describing good and bad deaths. Because each participant described a multifaceted view of a good death, for instance, no theme was mentioned by even half of the participants. Participants provided differing explanations for why given themes contributed to good deaths. Currently valued aspects of life were not easily translated into end-of-life preferences. For example, although the majority of participants identified their family as being important, many gave reasons why they did not want their family members present when they died. CONCLUSIONS: Because of the heterogeneity of views and the difficulty in inferring end-of-life preferences from current values, older adults should be asked not only questions about general values, but also specific questions about their end-of-life choices and the reasons for these choices. A thorough understanding of an individual's end-of-life preferences may help health professionals working with older adults develop patient-centered care plans for the end of life. [source]