Global Political Economy (global + political_economy)

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Humanities and Social Sciences


Selected Abstracts


Because People Matter: Studying Global Political Economy

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PERSPECTIVES, Issue 4 2001
Ronnie D. Lipschutz
The 1990s were hard on our traditional theories of International Relations and International Political Economy, and the Millennium has brought the End of Meta-Narrative as We Know It. In this article, I discuss and dissect three of the past decade's meta-narratives, and show how they were no more than failed efforts to shore up the decomposing corpus of mainstream theories. In their stead, I offer a preliminary description of a contextual and contingent approach to thinking about and analyzing global political economy. I place people at the center of my framework, and use the tools of historical materialism, feminist theory, and agency-structure analysis to generate an understanding of the relationship between what I call the "social individual" and global politics and political economy. [source]


Women and Work in the New Global Political Economy

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 3 2008
Adrienne Roberts
First page of article [source]


Governance for reconstruction in Africa: challenges for policy communities and coalitions

GLOBAL NETWORKS, Issue 1 2002
Pamela Mbabazi
This article seeks to advance analyses and responses to conflict prevention and reconstruction in Africa that go beyond state-centric perspectives to include a range of non-state players. Drawing on examples from both Uganda and Canada, it focuses on the activities of NGOs that have ,partnered' with state-based actors in various peacekeeping and peace-building operations as well as on the increasingly important role played by think-tanks. The latter have emerged in Africa as major contributors to the proliferating literature on the political economy of violence, an approach that recognizes that African conflict reflects imperatives of production and consumption in relations that juxtapose Africa's political institutions and cultures with international and global political economies. The article argues that novel forms of ,security communities' are emerging from the non-state/state/international partnerships and coalitions that have developed around contemporary issues like ,blood' diamonds, small arms, debt and HIV/AIDS, thus drawing attention to connections between conflict and development. [source]


Commodified Cadavers and the Political Economy of the Spectacle,

INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY, Issue 2 2010
Renée Marlin-Bennett
Traveling anatomy exhibitions import plasticized, posed human cadavers and place them on display. We explore the current industry, its history, and the spectacle of anatomy exhibits. The commodification of cadavers is examined as a problem in global political economy. The absence of global rules identifying plastinated cadavers as human remains allows a globalized plastination and exhibition industry. The spectacle of the exhibitions themselves divert attention away from important moral questions about the proper use of human remains and about the provenance of the cadavers used to create plastinates. The absence of global norms and the distraction of spectacle results in a global regime permitting commodification of cadavers. [source]


Because People Matter: Studying Global Political Economy

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PERSPECTIVES, Issue 4 2001
Ronnie D. Lipschutz
The 1990s were hard on our traditional theories of International Relations and International Political Economy, and the Millennium has brought the End of Meta-Narrative as We Know It. In this article, I discuss and dissect three of the past decade's meta-narratives, and show how they were no more than failed efforts to shore up the decomposing corpus of mainstream theories. In their stead, I offer a preliminary description of a contextual and contingent approach to thinking about and analyzing global political economy. I place people at the center of my framework, and use the tools of historical materialism, feminist theory, and agency-structure analysis to generate an understanding of the relationship between what I call the "social individual" and global politics and political economy. [source]


Economic Nationalism as a Challenge to Economic Liberalism?

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES QUARTERLY, Issue 3 2002
Lessons from the 19th Century
What kind of challenge does economic nationalism pose to economic liberalism in today's global political economy? Conventional wisdom holds that economic nationalism is an outdated ideology in this age of globalization and economic liberalization. But this argument rests on understandings of economic nationalism that are increasingly being called into question by recent scholarship. In this article, I show how the history of economic nationalism in the 19th century provides strong support for two important but potentially controversial arguments made in recent literature about the nature of economic nationalism: (1) that this ideology is most properly defined by its nationalist content (rather than as a variant of realism or as an ideology of protectionism), and (2) that it can be associated with a wide range of policy projects, including the endorsement of liberal economic policies. With these two points established through historical analysis, I conclude that economic nationalism should be seen still to be a powerful ideology in the current period, but that its relationship to the policy goals of economic liberals is an ambiguous one, just as it was in the 19th century. [source]


Thick Prescriptions: Toward an Interpretation of Pharmaceutical Sales Practices

MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY QUARTERLY, Issue 3 2004
MICHAEL J. OLDANI
Anthropologists of medicine and science are increasingly studying all aspects of pharmaceutical industry practices,from research and development to the marketing of prescription drugs. This article ethnographically explores one particular stage in the life cycle of pharmaceuticals: sales and marketing. Drawing on a range of sources,investigative journalism, medical ethics, and autoethnography,the author examines the day-to-day activities of pharmaceutical salespersons, or drug reps, during the 1990s. He describes in detail the pharmaceutical gift cycle, a three-way exchange network between doctors, salespersons, and patients and how this process of exchange is currently in a state of involution. This gift economy exists to generate prescriptions (scripts) and can mask and/or perpetuate risks and side effects for patients. With implications of pharmaceutical industry practices impacting everything from the personal-psychological to the global political economy, medical anthropologists can play a lead role in the emerging scholarly discourse concerned with critical pharmaceutical studies. [source]


Zones of Exclusion: Offshore Extraction, the Contestation of Space and Physical Displacement in the Nigerian Delta and the Mexican Gulf

ANTIPODE, Issue 3 2009
Anna Zalik
Abstract:, This article examines two aid interventions that manifest the merging of community development/relief and industrial security policy in the petroleum offshore of the Nigerian Niger Delta and the Mexican Gulf. In the Nigerian case, the article considers the crisis in the Warri region of Delta State in 2003, the subsequent evacuation of local residents, and the surrounding context of oil-related violence. Simmering since the 1990s, the 2003 Warri conflict displaced thousands due to competing community claims to territory that "hosts" oil installations, Shell and Chevron primarily. In Mexico, the analysis centers on the implementation of 2003 Mexican security legislation, prompted by International Maritime Organization post 9/11 security policy, that amplifies the "Zone of Exclusion" around offshore installations. To offset the loss of livelihoods resulting from the "exclusion zone", Mexican state agencies offered financing to support the conversion of the displaced small-scale fishers to fish farming. The varying forms of displacement prompted by these two "liberating" interventions reflect the socio-historical specificity of territorial relations in the Nigerian and Mexican extractive regimes. These relations constitute divergent extractive settings which have come to play contrasting roles in the global political economy of oil, one highly volatile, the other relatively stable. [source]


The Politics of Asian Engagement: Ideas, Institutions, and Academics

AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF POLITICS AND HISTORY, Issue 3 2009
Mark Beeson
The study of Australia's Asian engagement , just as much as the history of the process itself , has been shaped by structural shifts in the international system and the global political economy as they reverberate through domestic political debates. As a consequence, ideas about Asian engagement tell us as much about the character of national political debates as they do about Australian policy-makers'perceptions of the region. Understandings of Asia as a transnational political space are shaped by national conflicts and struggles over issues such as communism or national identity. Ideas and disputes over Australia's relationship with Asia become closely aligned with conflict between conservative and radical academic approaches to Asia. With the end of the Cold War in the 1980s and 1990s, the triumph of neoliberalism and the waning of ideological politics of the 1960s were mirrored in academic approaches that adopted a policy or cultural approach to Asia. [source]