Global Companies (global + company)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Design differentiation for global companies: Value exporters and value collectors

DESIGN MANAGEMENT REVIEW, Issue 4 2001
Clive Grinyer
In the global marketplace, should companies maintain uniform product profiles,some with strong national characteristics,or adapt regionally? Most companies tend toward one end or the other, concludes Clive Grinyer. Clearly distinguishing between "value exporters" and "value collectors," he articulates the advantages and disadvantages of each. Companies must strike their own strategic balance, hopefully without diluting the regional diversity that makes life and consumer choices so interesting. [source]


Work-life balance is a cross-generational concern,and a key to retaining high performers at Accenture

GLOBAL BUSINESS AND ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE, Issue 6 2008
Sharon Klun
Members of Generations X and Y are even more insistent than baby boomers are about balancing their professional and personal lives,a potential retention issue exacerbated by the shrinking pool of skilled talent. Three case studies highlight Accenture's successful new work-life program, Future Leave, which enables high performers to take extended time off for personal reasons without derailing promising or established careers with the company. The author also highlights some differences between the challenges that female and male professionals anticipate they will face over the next several years and cautions that global companies will need to become more adept at tailoring work-life programs to meet a range of needs in their increasingly diverse global workforces. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Globalization of the HR function: The next step in HR's transformation?

GLOBAL BUSINESS AND ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE, Issue 2 2008
Karen Piercy
A study confirms HR's progress in moving from a transactional function to a strategic partner. The function now faces pressures to globalize by adopting service delivery models that better rationalize costs, leverage common technology and processes, and focus resources on global HR processes that can create competitive differentiation for the enterprise. The authors discuss five service delivery models along a continuum of commonality of business needs, and present four cases of global companies that found the best fit for their needs. Key determinants include financial considerations, HR service requirements, and cultural readiness. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Measuring and managing engagement in a cross-cultural workforce: New insights for global companies

GLOBAL BUSINESS AND ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE, Issue 1 2006
Paul Sanchez
Should a company take a global or local approach to building engagement in its worldwide workforce? Research by Mercer Human Resource Consulting finds that country norms for drivers of engagement, as well as for other employee perceptions about their work and their employers, differ noticeably from region to region,and not in ways that might be expected. But a core set of drivers is emerging globally. This should help multinational companies distinguish between global and local engagement issues, design a manageable global engagement strategy and initiatives, and tailor implementation to meet the needs and preferences of the local workforce. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


The strength of HR practices in India and their effects on employee career success, performance, and potential

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2010
Stephen A. Stumpf
Abstract This study explores the role of HR practices for individual and organizational success via a survey of 4,811 employees from 32 units of 28 companies operating in India. We report on employee perceptions of the effectiveness of three specific human resource practices within their firms and the relationship of these practices to career success, performance, and potential. Companies operating in India appear to be creating strong human resource climates based on structured HR practices in performance management, professional development, and normalized performance ratings. The perceived effectiveness of these HR practices influences employees' perceptions of career success and, to a lesser extent, organizationally rated performance and potential. We report differences in perceptions of HR practices among national, international, and global companies and among the industries of information technology (IT), manufacturing, and services. The relationship to perceived HR practices and outcomes was partially contingent on firm geographic scope and industry sector. Implications for research and practice are discussed. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Global Restructuring and Liberalization: Côte d 'Ivoire and the End of the International Cocoa Market?

JOURNAL OF AGRARIAN CHANGE, Issue 2 2002
Bruno Losch
The restructuring of the world cocoa market has concluded with the liberalization of the sector in the world's leading producing country, Côte d'Ivoire, clearing the way for domination by an oligopoly of global companies. This paper describes how Côte d'Ivoire's share of world production created an illusion but not the reality of market power. In the 1990s, in the wake of failed attempts to influence the world market, the Ivorian cocoa sector experienced a series of upheavals that were both pivotal to broader changes in the global market and a refiection of them. The converging strategies of new Ivorianfirms and of the major global grinding companies resulted in increased vertical integration in Côte d'Ivoire, exemplified in the development of ,origin grinding '. Later, financial difficulties encountered by Ivorian firms led to global companies taking control. Amongst the results of these changes are a decline in the role of traders, a redefinition of the relationship between grinders and chocolate manufacturers, and a standardization of cocoa quality around an average ,bulk' level. This signals the end of ,the producing countries' and of the global market. [source]


Valuing knowledge sharing in Lafarge

KNOWLEDGE AND PROCESS MANAGEMENT: THE JOURNAL OF CORPORATE TRANSFORMATION, Issue 1 2006
Alexandre Perrin
This paper describes the detailed process of a knowledge sharing strategy at Lafarge, a global player in the construction materials industry. The case study explains why this company uses such a strategy to create value for stakeholders, provide a local access to know-how and build a knowledge sharing culture among divisions. It argues that a well-articulated approach of a knowledge sharing strategy consists in creating a knowledge portfolio, supporting a knowledge management structure, providing tools for collaboration and nurture a culture of knowledge sharing through awards. At the end, we discuss the lessons learned by the Corporate Knowledge Manager on this strategy and we study how she can quantify the value brought by its action. In a whole, this paper gives insights of critical issues in moving a global company towards a knowledge-sharing organization. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]