Foster Care (foster + care)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Terms modified by Foster Care

  • foster care placement
  • foster care system

  • Selected Abstracts


    ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF STUDENTS IN FOSTER CARE: IMPEDED OR IMPROVED?

    PSYCHOLOGY IN THE SCHOOLS, Issue 5 2004
    Larry D. Evans
    Foster care's impact on academic development was investigated for 392 students reentering foster care. Psychoeducational evaluation was performed at initial and return placements. Average achievement increased .22 points between placements. Students reentering care did not show differences in achievement or IQ compared to control students with a single placement. Although average achievement showed a small increase between placements, some students showed large changes. Declining achievement was directly related to above-average initial achievement ( p < .001), and indirectly related to not being in special education ( p < .001) and nonminority race ( p < .02). Results provide evidence that overall academic development appears neither enhanced nor hindered by foster care placement, but specific groups may be at risk for poor gains. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Psychol Schs 41: 527,535, 2004. [source]


    THE EFFECTS OF ORGANIZATIONAL FORM IN THE MIXED MARKET FOR FOSTER CARE

    ANNALS OF PUBLIC AND COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS, Issue 2 2010
    Jeremy Thornton
    ABSTRACT,:,This paper uses proprietary quality of care data to examine the consequences of organizational form in privatized US foster care services. The contract failure hypothesis generically proposes that nonprofits should provide higher quality services, relative to for-profits, when output is costly to observe. Advocates argue that the nonprofits offer important consumer protections when public services are contracted to private agencies. Contrary to expectations, we find that nonprofit firms do not offer higher quality services. We explore the possibility that monitoring efforts by state regulators or competition among foster care agencies effectively mitigate the influence of organizational form in this particular mixed market. [source]


    Children in Foster Care: A Nursing Perspective on Research, Policy, and Child Health Issues

    JOURNAL FOR SPECIALISTS IN PEDIATRIC NURSING, Issue 2 2001
    Mary Margaret GottesmanArticle first published online: 23 FEB 200
    ISSUES AND PURPOSE. To examine the roles of public policy and poverty on the rising number of children in family foster care, and to examine the impact of different types of family foster care on children's well-being. CONCLUSIONS. Recent changes in welfare legislation increase the likelihood of family poverty, with a subsequent increase in the number of children in out-of-home care. Greater emphasis needs to be placed on preventing entry into out-of-home care, improving the quality of foster care, and giving children a voice in care decisions. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS. Nurses have important roles to play in the prevention of family dissolution, the design of healthcare delivery systems for children in foster care, in evaluating and educating all types of foster families, and as advocates in legal and legislative proceedings. [source]


    Providing Interdisciplinary Services to At-Risk Families to Prevent the Placement of Children In Foster Care

    JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 4 2009
    Deborah J. Weimer
    ABSTRACT Grandparents need support to take on the responsibility of children whose parents cannot care for them due to drug addiction, mental health issues, HIV illness, or other health problems. Without support and assistance, these families and children are likely to end up enmeshed in the already overburdened child abuse and neglect system. The University of Maryland has created a model program providing social work and legal services to at-risk grandparent families to help avoid the unnecessary placement of these children in foster care. In this new program, student attorneys and student social workers worked with the grandparent client to help stabilize the family, providing representation or advice on housing, public benefits, custody, and school-related issues. Joint education of student attorneys and student social workers in a clinical experience enhances their understanding of their roles and those of the other profession and prepares them for a more thoughtful and informed approach to family law, child welfare cases, and at-risk children. [source]


    Asking the Right Questions: Utilizing a Judicial Checklist to Track the Educational Success of Youth in Foster Care

    JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 2 2006
    SUSAN A. WEISS
    ABSTRACT Asking about the educational objectives for children in foster care has not been a priority in most juvenile and family courts. Research has shown that compared to the general school population, children in foster care have lower grade point averages, change schools more frequently, earn fewer credits toward graduation, and are more likely to be placed in special education programs. In response, Casey Family Programs, in collaboration with the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges' Permanency Planning for Children Department, developed a Judicial Checklist with key educational questions to be asked from the bench. The Checklist has become a useful tool for juvenile and family court judges when assessing the effectiveness of current educational placements of the children who come before their courts, tracking their performance, and in making a positive future impact on their educational outcomes. [source]


    Building Bridges for Babies in Foster Care: The Babies Can't Wait Initiative

    JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 2 2004
    SHERYL DICKER
    ABSTRACT In 2001, the New York State Permanent Judicial Commission on Justice for Children, chaired by New York State's Chief Judge Judith Kaye, developed the Babies Can't Wait Initiative to maximize the well-being and permanency prospects of infants in foster care. This court-based innovation became a path to healthy development for babies in foster care, a bridge to unprecedented collaboration among the New York City Family Court, child welfare system, and service providers and merged knowledge about child development with court and child welfare practice. This article tells the story of the Babies Can't Wait Initiative,its creation, implementation, successes, and lessons. [source]


    Predicting Family Reunification, Adoption, and Subsidized Guardianship Among Adolescents in Foster Care

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 3 2010
    Sonya J. Leathers
    Although national legislation has attempted to decrease the length of time that children spend in foster care, these policies have been less effective with adolescents than with children, raising questions about how best to promote permanency for adolescents. This study examined factors that predict adolescent adoption, subsidized guardianship, and reunification. The caseworkers and foster parents of 203 randomly selected 12- to 13-year-olds placed in traditional or specialized foster care were interviewed. Permanency outcomes were prospectively tracked for 8 years. By the end of the study, over 40% of the adolescents were placed in permanent homes. As hypothesized, a strong relationship with a biological mother predicted successful reunification, and a high degree of integration into a foster home predicted adoption. Additionally, when compared with adoption, subsidized guardianship with foster parents occurred more frequently for youth with strong relationships with their biological mothers and weaker relationships with their foster families. Unexpectedly, behavior problems were not related to any permanency outcomes. Results suggest that promotion of strong relationships with adults is the key in efforts to find permanent families for foster children. Furthermore, efforts to attain permanency should not cease during adolescence. [source]


    What Research Tells Us About the Intersecting Streams of Homelessness and Foster Care

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 3 2009
    Cheryl Zlotnick RN
    This paper reviews mourning evidence linking foster care and homelessness and considers new approaches for intervention. Although there is no causal evidence that family homelessness leads to foster care or vice versa, the association no longer originates solely from samples of homeless people, but also from samples of people with childhood histories of foster care. Many programs work with families, children or youth based on their current living situations and limits imposed by funders. This results in discontinued services when the living situations change. Given the strong and consistent associations between homelessness and foster care, a better approach is to design programs that work with transient families regardless of their living situation. Parenting is key. Whether the parents arc living with their children in homeless circumstances or arc formerly homeless parents working to reunify with their children, coordinated, comprehensive, trauma-informed and family focused programs are needed to support parenting and family stability. [source]


    Making Child Protection Policy: The Crime and Misconduct Commission Inquiry into Abuse of Children in Foster Care in Queensland

    AUSTRALIAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, Issue 3 2008
    Clare Tilbury
    Internationally as well as in Australia, public inquiries have become one of the dominant means of scrutinising child protection services. As such, inquiries have become a policy mechanism for defining the problem of child abuse, and developing possible solutions. This article examines the 2004 Crime and Misconduct Commission Inquiry into the Abuse of Children in Foster Care in Queensland. It discusses both the problems and potential of public inquiries in promoting positive change in a contested policy field like child protection. [source]


    Part of the Family: Pathways through Foster Care

    CHILD & FAMILY SOCIAL WORK, Issue 1 2004
    Kate Wilson Professor of Social Work
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    BENEFITS AND COSTS OF INTENSIVE FOSTER CARE SERVICES: THE CASEY FAMILY PROGRAMS COMPARED TO STATE SERVICES

    CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC POLICY, Issue 3 2009
    RICHARD O. ZERBE
    The foster care system attempts to prepare children and youth who have suffered child maltreatment for successful adult lives. This study documents the economic advantages of a privately funded foster care program that provided longer term, more intensive, and more expensive services compared to public programs. The study found significant differences in major adult educational, health, and social outcomes between children placed in the private program and those placed in public programs operated by Oregon and Washington. For the outcomes for which we could find financial data, the estimated present value of the enhanced foster care services exceeded their extra costs. Generalizing to the roughly 100,000 adolescents age 12-17 entering foster care each year, if all of them were to receive the private model of services, the savings for a single cohort of these children could be about $6.3 billion in 2007 dollars. (JEL D61, H75) [source]


    Disabled children living away from home in foster care and residential settings

    DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE & CHILD NEUROLOGY, Issue 12 2008
    Hilary Hart
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Multidisciplinary antenatal care for opiate-using women: Child-care issues

    DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, Issue 2 2010
    ADERONKE A. ADENIJI
    Abstract Introduction and Aims. The fact that particular parents suffer afflictions limiting their ability to care does not mean that they should automatically be deemed unsuitable parents. Prompted by neonatal team concerns about child-care issues, a local multidisciplinary group was set up to care for substance-abusing pregnant women in our region. Design and Methods. This project was conducted in order to review the records of all the women who had been discussed at our management planning meetings over the past 5 years. Our assessment tool records were reviewed and analysed using spss. Results. A total of 233 women were assessed. The majority of patients booked before 20 weeks (62%) and 96 women (41%) attended over 80% of their antenatal appointments. There was little change in substance use during the course of pregnancy. Overall, at delivery, 196 of the 233 women (84%) used methadone and 89(38%) used heroin. There was no correlation between usage and foster care of the baby (methadone: ,2 = 0.5, P = 0.8 NS) (heroin: ,2 = 3.1, P = 0.08 NS). There was an absolute correlation between social services involvement and foster care (,2 = 2.33, P < 0.0001). Adherence with planned antenatal appointments significantly increased the likelihood of a child being discharged with his mother (,2 = 6.7, P = 0.009). Discussion and Conclusions. The majority of newborns were discharged home with their mothers directly with the most significant factor in placing a child in foster care being prior involvement of social services. However, many of these families will continue to need support during the children's early years.[Adeniji AA, Purcell A, Pearson L, Antcliffe JM, Tutty S, Sinha C, Pairaudeau PW, Lindow SW. Multidisciplinary antenatal care for opiate-using women: Child-care issues. Drug Alcohol Rev 2009] [source]


    A NOT SO HAPPY BIRTHDAY: THE FOSTER YOUTH TRANSITION FROM ADOLESCENCE INTO ADULTHOOD

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 2 2010
    Miriam Aroni Krinsky
    Every year close to 25,000 youth age out of our foster care system; without the anchor of a family, former foster youth disproportionately join the ranks of the homeless, incarcerated, and unemployed. While the average age of financial independence in America is twenty-six years of age, we presume that foster youth can somehow attain financial and emotional independence by age eighteen. Instead, these adolescents are woefully unprepared for independent adult life, and when they falter, too often no one is there to provide support or guidance. As a result, former foster youth are ten times more likely to be arrested than youth of the same age, race, and sex and one in four youth who age out of foster care will end up in jail within the first two years after leaving care. This article will discuss strategies for changing these disheartening outcomes for transitioning foster youth, including breaking down our silos and collectively taking charge of the lives of children in our care; keeping a watchful eye on data and outcomes and using that information to guide our actions; ensuring that the voices of youth are an ever-present part of decisions and processes that will chart their future; and educating ourselves about best practices and new approaches. This article also discusses new opportunities that now exist to support foster youth as they move into adulthood, including new federal legislation that,for the first time,will allow states to support foster youth beyond age eighteen. Finally, this article provides a backdrop for this Special Issue and summarizes the insightful articles and innovative thinking contained herein. [source]


    A CASE FOR REFORM OF THE CHILD WELFARE SYSTEM

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 4 2007
    Miriam Aroni Krinsky
    There are more than half a million children in our nation's foster care system. While foster care is intended to provide a temporary safe harbor for abused and neglected children, too many of these youth spend years in foster care limbo,experiencing a turbulent life in motion as they move from placement to placement, community to community, and school to school. Youth in foster care commonly fail to receive basic health and psychological care, and nearly 20,000 youth age out of foster care every year to an adult path of homelessness, unemployment, and despair. Our entire community must work together to more responsibly parent these youth. This article will address how lawyers and child advocates can advocate for new approaches and enhanced support on behalf of the voiceless and most vulnerable members of our community. It will address existing hurdles and systemic challenges that have helped to create the current disheartening status quo. The article will then discuss strategies that advocates can employ to turn the corner on behalf of these youth at risk. [source]


    THE AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION ADDRESSES THE NATIONAL PROBLEM OF YOUTH AT RISK

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 3 2007
    Karen J. Mathis
    During the 2006,2007 American Bar Association (ABA) year, a special ABA Presidential Youth at Risk Initiative has addressed several important topics: addressing the needs of juvenile status offenders and their families; foster children aging out of the foster care system; increases in girls, especially girls of color, in the juvenile justice system; the need to better hear the voices of youth in court proceedings affecting them; and improving how laws can better address youth crossing over between juvenile justice and child welfare systems. Lawyers are encouraged to use their skills to improve the systems addressing at-risk youth and their families and to help facilitate coordination of youth-related community efforts. Learning how to effectively communicate with youth is an important skill attorneys must learn. Through the Youth at Risk Initiative, the ABA has held continuing legal education programs, hosted community roundtables among youth-serving stakeholders, and developed projects on: juvenile status offenders; lawyer assistance to youth transitioning from foster care; educating young girls on violence prevention, conflict resolution, and careers in law and justice; and provision of useful information to youth awaiting juvenile court hearings. New ABA policy has addressed services and programs to at-risk youth, assuring licensing, regulation, and monitoring of residential facilities serving at-risk youth, enhanced support for sexual minority foster and homeless youth, juvenile status offenders, and improving laws and policies related to youth exiting the foster care system. [source]


    STRICTLY LIABLE: GOVERNMENTAL USE OF THE PARENT,CHILD RELATIONSHIP AS A BASIS FOR HOLDING VICTIMS LIABLE FOR THEIR CHILD'S WITNESS TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 1 2006
    Sharon N. ClarkeArticle first published online: 10 FEB 200
    Studies estimate that between three and ten million children in the United States witness domestic violence annually. Although studies have demonstrated a co-occurrence of domestic violence and child abuse, there is no concrete evidence to support the assumption that a child's exposure to domestic violence increases the risk to the child of abuse or neglect. Recently the New York State Court of Appeals determined that a child's witness to abuse does not suffice, in and of itself, to show that removal of the child is necessary or that removal is in the "best interests" of the child. Programs which have developed alternatives to presumptive removal understand the importance of viewing the interests of the battered parent and children as being in accord with each other rather than in opposition. Private and government sponsored programs have demonstrated some success in protecting the parent-child relationship, ensuring the safety of both parent and child, and increasing accountability of batterers while reducing the necessity for removals. Alternative programs are less costly to the state than foster care, and emotionally less costly to the families. [source]


    UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES OF BARGAINING FOR ADOPTION ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS

    FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 3 2005
    Hansen Mary Eschelbach
    Families that adopt children who are in foster care may receive monthly adoption assistance payments to offset the cost of raising the adopted child. The amount of the adoption assistance payment is the subject of bargaining between the family and the child welfare authority. This article uses a bargaining model to highlight factors that, in addition to the expected costs of raising the child, might influence the outcome of bargaining over adoption assistance payments. Findings indicate that married parents who adopt children already in their care have an advantage in bargaining, and single women who adopt their kin or foster children have a disadvantage in bargaining. [source]


    VARYING EFFECT OF FERTILITY DETERMINANTS AMONG MIGRANT AND INDIGENOUS FEMALES IN THE TRANSITIONAL AGRO-ECOLOGICAL ZONE OF GHANA

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 1 2007
    Samuel Nii Ardey Codjoe
    ABSTRACT. The transitional agro-ecological zone of Ghana, located between the richly endowed south and the impoverished north, has attracted seasonal and permanent farm migrants, mainly from northern Ghana, who now live side by side with the indigenous people. While migrants have higher numbers of Muslims, indigenous people are mainly Christians. Although the majority of the migrants live in migrant quarters with less favourable socio-economic conditions, they are more successful farmers and therefore wealthier. The objectives are to examine the varying effect of fertility determinants among migrants and indigenous females. This paper uses data collected in 2002 among 194 females aged 15 to 49 years. Multiple regression models are used to assess fertility determinants. Results show that although migrant households were wealthier, migrant females were more traditional. They had more children living in foster care, and a lower proportion of them approved of men participating in household activities. In addition, they were less well educated, recorded higher infant mortality, gave birth earlier and used less contraception. Furthermore, while a female's migration status is statistically significant so far as non-proximate determinants of fertility are concerned, the same variable is not significant with respect to proximate determinants. In addition, a married female migrant would on average have almost one more child compared to her indigenous counterpart, and migrant females who had experienced the loss of a child would on average have 2.5 more children compared to their indigenous counterparts. Finally, more affluent migrant females have 0.08 fewer children compared to their indigenous counterpart. [source]


    Serologic Prevalence of Antibodies to Helicobacter pylori in Internationally Adopted Children

    HELICOBACTER, Issue 3 2003
    Laurie C. Miller
    ABSTRACT Background.Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been linked to gastritis, diarrhea, peptic ulcers, failure-to-thrive, anemia, as well as predisposition to gastric malignancies. Because many internationally adopted children have diarrhea, failure-to-thrive, and anemia on arrival to the US, we determined the prevalence of HP antibodies among these children. Methods. Serum samples from 226 unselected children from 18 countries who were evaluated in the International Adoption Clinic at New England Medical Center were tested for antibodies to H. pylori. The results of serologic screening were analyzed in relation to age at adoption, site of residence prior to adoption, weight and height, and the presence or absence of anemia, diarrhea, or intestinal parasites. Results. 31% of internationally adopted children had antibodies to H. pylori. The presence of H. pylori -antibodies was associated with residence in an orphanage (vs. foster care) prior to adoption, older age at adoption, and coinfection with intestinal parasites. No direct effects on height or weight were identified; no associations with diarrhea or anemia were found. Conclusions. Internationally adopted children have a high incidence of exposure to H. pylori, as diagnosed serologically. Residence in an orphanage (compared with foster care), older age at adoption, and coinfection with intestinal parasites were more common among children seropositive for anti- H. pylori antibodies. [source]


    The placement of infants in foster care

    INFANT MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL, Issue 5 2002
    Fred Wulczyn
    The fundamental question explored in this study concerns the relationship between age and the risk of placement into foster care, the likelihood a child will leave placement, and the likelihood a child will return to foster care having been discharged. The study is based on the experiences of more than 690,000 children in 11 states over an eight-year period, from 1990 to 1997. The results suggest quite strongly that very young children are at greatest risk of entry into foster care, particularly if they are from urban areas. Specifically, 1% of children under one year and 2.5% of children under the age of four months enter foster care. Moreover, once in care, children under the age of four months at the time of placement remain in foster care longer than other children. The implications of these findings for public policy and future research are discussed. 2002 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health. [source]


    Congregate care for infants and toddlers: Shedding new light on an old question

    INFANT MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL, Issue 5 2002
    Brenda Jones Harden
    With the advent of the "crack" epidemic and the concurrent decrease in available foster homes for young children, the placement of infants and toddlers in residential congregate care settings has resurfaced in some of the larger urban areas of the United States. Despite the controversy surrounding this type of placement, current research on congregate care settings is almost nonexistent. The present study examines the congregate care facilities that were established in an urban area in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States, as a response to the placement crisis for young children in foster care. In addition, the study compares the development of a group of children placed in these settings with a group who were placed in foster home settings. Findings suggest that congregate care facilities differ in their appropriateness for young children based on the number of children in the home and the practice philosophy of the group home. The study documented that children reared in foster family homes fared better than their group-reared counterparts on a variety of variables, including mental development and adaptive skills. In contrast, children reared in congregate care facilities were similar to foster home-reared children regarding observed and reported behavior problems. Implications of these finding for policies and practices related to congregate care placements are discussed. 2002 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health. [source]


    The Computerized MacArthur Story Stem Battery , a pilot study of a novel medium for assessing children's representations of relationships

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF METHODS IN PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, Issue 4 2006
    Helen Minnis
    Abstract Story stem measures allow the assessment of children's representations of relationship functioning, but are expensive and time-consuming to administer. We developed a computerized story stem measure which does not require specific training for administrators and which allows the child to produce their own animated, narrated story completion. This paper describes, firstly, the reliability of the Computerized MacArthur Story Stem Battery (CMSSB) and, secondly, a preliminary comparison of children in foster care and school controls on narrative coherence, intentionality and avoidance. The CMSSB showed good inter-rater reliability. A group of children in foster care showed significantly poorer coherence of narrative, less intentionality and greater avoidance on the CMSSB compared to a school comparison group. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Mortality after care among young adult foster children in Sweden

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WELFARE, Issue 3 2001
    Bo Vinnerljung
    This exploratory study looks at mortality after care among 13,100 former Swedish foster children, placed before their teens. Sources used are two national databases, on child welfare interventions and causes of death. Risk ratios of death for foster children are compared with those of their peers in the general population and with a comparison group, consisting of 10,668 young adults from adverse home backgrounds, who never entered foster family care before their teens. Both ex-foster children and the comparison group were young adults (19,26 years old) at time of follow-up. Results show a moderately elevated risk ratio for both groups compared with peers in the general population, mainly due to more frequent unnatural deaths, especially suicides. Time at first placement was not related to mortality among men, but there was a weak tendency of a higher risk ratio for girls placed at age 7,12. Information on time spent in care is used with caution, due to possible problems with reliability. Almost all comparisons between the foster care and the comparison group fell short of statistical significance. For foster children who had spent more than five years in care, the risk ratio tended to be higher than for foster children with shorter care experience, and similar to that of the comparison group. Foster children who had been in care for less then six years thus tended to have a lower risk ratio than the comparison group. [source]


    Children in Foster Care: A Nursing Perspective on Research, Policy, and Child Health Issues

    JOURNAL FOR SPECIALISTS IN PEDIATRIC NURSING, Issue 2 2001
    Mary Margaret GottesmanArticle first published online: 23 FEB 200
    ISSUES AND PURPOSE. To examine the roles of public policy and poverty on the rising number of children in family foster care, and to examine the impact of different types of family foster care on children's well-being. CONCLUSIONS. Recent changes in welfare legislation increase the likelihood of family poverty, with a subsequent increase in the number of children in out-of-home care. Greater emphasis needs to be placed on preventing entry into out-of-home care, improving the quality of foster care, and giving children a voice in care decisions. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS. Nurses have important roles to play in the prevention of family dissolution, the design of healthcare delivery systems for children in foster care, in evaluating and educating all types of foster families, and as advocates in legal and legislative proceedings. [source]


    ,You've got to grow up when you've got a kid': Marginalized young women's accounts of motherhood

    JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY & APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 4 2008
    Alison Rolfe
    Abstract Teenage motherhood has been a source of considerable debate in policy and media circles in recent years. This paper explores the meanings of teenage motherhood for young women who were mothers before the age of 21, who were living in economically deprived areas of England and most of whom had been in residential or foster care. Qualitative interviews were carried out at several sites across England, with a total of 33 young women taking part in group interviews and one-to-one interviews. The accounts of the young women suggest that they talk about motherhood in three main ways: as ,hardship and reward', ,growing up and responsibility' and ,doing things differently'. It is argued that these ways of talking about motherhood present a different picture of teenage motherhood from that of dominant discourses. Furthermore, the young women are active in negotiating and constructing their own identities as mothers, carers and women. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Adoption, permanent care and foster care: Home-based care in and beyond the 1990s

    JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, Issue 5 2000
    C O'Neill
    Abstract: Home-based care in Australia has changed considerably in the past two decades. The majority of children in adoptive, permanent care and foster families are likely to have experienced abuse, neglect and multiple placements. The disruptive behaviours displayed by these children undermine the potential for attachment offered by their new families. While the needs of the child will be obvious, the challenge for paediatricians is to recognize the relative instability of these newly established families and the high levels of stress they experience. [source]


    Providing Interdisciplinary Services to At-Risk Families to Prevent the Placement of Children In Foster Care

    JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 4 2009
    Deborah J. Weimer
    ABSTRACT Grandparents need support to take on the responsibility of children whose parents cannot care for them due to drug addiction, mental health issues, HIV illness, or other health problems. Without support and assistance, these families and children are likely to end up enmeshed in the already overburdened child abuse and neglect system. The University of Maryland has created a model program providing social work and legal services to at-risk grandparent families to help avoid the unnecessary placement of these children in foster care. In this new program, student attorneys and student social workers worked with the grandparent client to help stabilize the family, providing representation or advice on housing, public benefits, custody, and school-related issues. Joint education of student attorneys and student social workers in a clinical experience enhances their understanding of their roles and those of the other profession and prepares them for a more thoughtful and informed approach to family law, child welfare cases, and at-risk children. [source]


    Families of Origin, Foster Care Experience, and the Transition to Adulthood

    JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 2 2009
    Donna Dea Holland
    ABSTRACT The rising number of young adults transitioning to adulthood from the foster care system has been a focus of prior research. The current study explored foster care youths transitions to adulthood to identify factors that contribute to or inhibit prosocial adult outcomes. Structured data derived from interviews with foster care-experienced adults and child welfare professionals as well as focus groups with foster care-experienced adults and foster parents were analyzed using content analysis to examine the transition to adulthood from foster care. Positive or negative life outcomes resulted from two key mechanisms: a) issues related to family of origin (inadequate parenting, abuse); and b) foster care experiences (including a pattern of "drift"). We explore disidentification, a new social psychological concept. Throughout, key players provide policy recommendations for the child welfare system. [source]


    Visit Coaching: Building on Family Strengths to Meet Children's Needs

    JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 1 2008
    Marty Beyer
    ABSTRACT Visits between children in foster care and their families often do not build on family strengths or help them demonstrate they can meet their children's safety and developmental needs. Visits can alienate parents, children, and foster parents, and the parent's grief, anger, and preoccupation with complying with court-ordered treatment often obscure their children's needs. Visit coaching is an innovative approach that can replace parenting classes and office-based visits with hands-on guidance for families in meeting their children's needs. The visit coach, who may be their caseworker or a variety of other trained individuals, helps parents take charge of visits and demonstrate more responsiveness to each child. [source]