Five-factor Model (five-factor + model)

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Psychology


Selected Abstracts


META-ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE FIVE-FACTOR MODEL OF PERSONALITY AND HOLLAND'S OCCUPATIONAL TYPES

PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 1 2003
MURRAY R. BARRICK
The purpose of this study is to examine the nature and magnitude of the relationship between 2 widely accepted models for classifying individual differences,the 5-factor model of personality and Holland's RI-ASEC occupational types. Based on extensive meta-analyses, our results illustrate that there are meaningful relations between some FFM personality dimensions and some RIASEC types. The strongest relationships were obtained between the RIASEC types of enterprising and artistic with the FFM personality dimensions of Extraversion and Openness to Experience, p= .41 and .39, respectively. Three other RIASEC types had moderate correlations with at least 1 FFM personality trait. In contrast, the realistic type was not related to any FFM personality traits. Multiple regression analyses in which each RIASEC type is regressed on the FFM scores (based on meta-analytic estimates), revealed a multiple R of .11 for realistic, .26 for investigative, .42 for artistic, .31 for social, .47 for enterprising, and .27 for conventional types. The overall conclusion from the study is that although FFM personality traits and RIASEC types are related, they are not merely substitutes for each other. [source]


The intervening role of social worldviews in the relationship between the five-factor model of personality and social attitudes

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2007
A. Van Hiel
Abstract The present research investigates in a student (N,=,183) and a voter sample (N,=,276) whether the relationships between the Five-Factor Model (FFM) personality dimensions and social attitudes (i.e. Right-Wing Authoritarianism [RWA] and Social Dominance Orientation [SDO]) are mediated by social worldviews (i.e. dangerous and jungle worldviews). Two important results were obtained. First, the perception of the world as inherently dangerous and chaotic partially mediated the relationships of the personality dimensions Openness and Neuroticism and the social attitude RWA. Second, the jungle worldview completely mediated the relationships between Agreeableness and SDO, but considerable item overlap between the jungle worldview and SDO was also noted. It was further revealed that acquiescence response set and item overlap had an impact on social worldviews and attitudes, but that their relationships were hardly affected by these biases. The discussion focuses on the status of social worldviews to explain social attitudes. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Person-factors in the California Adult Q-Set: closing the door on personality trait types?,

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 1 2006
Robert R. McCrae
To investigate recent hypotheses of replicable personality types, we examined data from 1540 self-sorts on the California Adult Q-Set (CAQ). Conventional factor analysis of the items showed the expected Five-Factor Model (FFM). Inverse factor analysis across random subsamples showed that none of the previously reported person-factors were replicated. Only two factors were replicable, and, most importantly, these factors were contaminated by mean level differences in item endorsement. Results were not due to sample size or age heterogeneity. Subsequent inverse factor analysis of standardized items revealed at least three replicable factors; when five person-factors were extracted, they could be aligned precisely with the dimensions of the FFM. The major factors of person similarity can be accounted for entirely in terms of the FFM, consistent with the hypothesis that there are no replicable personality types in the CAQ. Published in 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Trait emotional intelligence: psychometric investigation with reference to established trait taxonomies

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 6 2001
K V Petrides
This paper sets out the theoretical foundation of emotional intelligence (EI) as a constellation of traits and self-perceived abilities. The discriminant validity of trait EI is explored in two studies. In study 1 (N,=,227), the psychometric properties of the BarOn Emotional Quotient inventory were scrutinized through confirmatory factor analysis and the measure was found to be unifactorial. When the EQ-i was examined concurrently with the Eysenck Personality Profiler, a clear trait EI factor emerged in Eysenckian factor space. In study 2 (N,=,166), a modified version of the EQ-i was examined concurrently with the NEO PI-R and a truncated trait EI factor was isolated within the Five-Factor Model. Results are discussed with explicit reference to established personality models and it is concluded that trait EI can be conceptualized as a distinct composite construct at the primary level of hierarchical trait structures. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Nonverbal assessment of the Big Five personality factors

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 1 2001
Sampo V. Paunonen
The Nonverbal Personality Questionnaire (NPQ) is an experimental, structured, nonverbal measure of 16 personality traits. Its items lack verbal content and, therefore, the inventory is useful for cross-cultural research. Our goal is this research was to select a subset of the NPQ items to form a new nonverbal questionnaire based on the Five-Factor Model of personality. We describe the construction of the Five-Factor Nonverbal Personality Questionnaire (FF-NPQ), and present data on its psychometric properties. These data include scale internal consistencies, intercorrelations, convergences with verbal measures of the Big Five factors, discriminant validity correlations, correlations with peer ratings, and ability to predict socially important behaviour criteria such as smoking and alcohol consumption. In a second study, we report on the psychometric properties of the FF-NPQ in an independent sample of respondents from seven different countries. The utility of the new nonverbal inventory for cross-cultural research is discussed. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


The effects of personality, affectivity, and work commitment on motivation to improve work through learning

HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2002
Sharon S. Naquin
This study examined the degree to which the dimensions from the Five-Factor Model of personality, affectivity, and work commitment (including work ethic, job involvement, affective commitment, and continuance commitment) influenced motivation to improve work through learning. Data were obtained from a nonrandom sample of 239 private-sector employees who were participants of in-house training programs. The hypothesized causal relationships were tested using structural equation modeling. Findings indicated that these dispositional effects were significant antecedents of motivation to improve work through learning. Specifically, 57 percent of the variance in motivation to improve work through learning was explained by positive affectivity, work commitment, and extraversion. [source]


Integrity Tests and the Five-Factor Model of Personality: A Review and Empirical Test of Two Alternative Positions

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SELECTION AND ASSESSMENT, Issue 2 2006
Bernd Marcus
The psychological meaning of integrity test scores has been explored predominantly in relation to the five-factor model of personality (FFM). Two alternative positions on this topic can be identified in the literature which state, respectively, that integrity tests measure (a) a higher-order factor of personality covering three FFM dimensions or (b) a linear composite of numerous facets from various domains within the FFM. An empirical test of these alternative positions, using structural equation modeling, revealed that the value of both views depended on the type of integrity test examined. With a personality-based integrity test, position (a) had to be refuted, whereas position (b) was strongly supported. There was also more supportive evidence for position (b) with an overt test, but the difference was far less pronounced than for the personality-based measure. Possible consequences for theories on the role of personality in personnel selection are discussed. [source]


Interpersonal Orientation in Context: Correlates and Effects of Interpersonal Complementarity on Subjective and Cardiovascular Experiences

JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 4 2007
Jessi L. Smith
ABSTRACT Interpersonal orientation (IO) generally refers to individual differences in preference for social interaction. The influence of IO, however, likely depends on the nature of complementarity within the interpersonal context. Using the interpersonal circumplex and Five-Factor Model, we first selected a measure of IO characterized by affiliation and neuroticism. Second, we examined the influence of IO on subjective, physiological, and nonverbal experiences as a function of experimentally manipulated complementarity or noncomplementarity. We hypothesized that women in noncomplementarity conditions (i.e., women low in IO working with a friendly confederate, women high in IO working with an unfriendly confederate) would experience the interpersonal situation more negatively compared to women in complementarity conditions. Study results confirmed this prediction, with noncomplementarity in IO resulting in greater physiological reactivity, greater likelihood to attempt nonverbally to restore complementarity, more partner-related thoughts, and a reduced desire to seek out attention compared to women working in complementarity conditions. Implications for research on IO as a person variable are discussed. [source]


Putting the Five-Factor Model Into Context: Evidence Linking Big Five Traits to Narrative Identity

JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 5 2006
Peter Raggatt
ABSTRACT The study examined relationships between the Big Five personality traits and thematic content extracted from self-reports of life history data. One hundred and five "mature age" university students (M=30.1 years) completed the NEO PI-R trait measure, and the Personality Web Protocol. The protocol examines constituents of identity by asking participants to describe 24 key "attachments" from their life histories (significant events, people, places, objects, and possessions). Participants sorted these attachments into clusters and provided a self-descriptive label for each cluster (e.g., "adventurous self"). It was predicted that the thematic content of these cluster labels would be systematically related to Big Five trait scores (e.g., that labels referring to strength or positive emotions would be linked to Extraversion). The hypothesized links were obtained for each of the Big Five trait domains except Conscientiousness. Results are discussed with a view to broadening our understanding of the Five-Factor Model in relation to units of personality other than traits. [source]


The Role of Personality in Task and Relationship Conflict

JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 3 2002
Joyce E. Bono
ABSTRACT Two studies explored the extent to which dispositions influence the attributions individuals make about the type of conflict they experience. Traits from the Five-Factor Model of personality (FFM) were linked to the tendency to experience task-and relationship-oriented conflict. Results provide some support for the idea that individuals have stable tendencies in the attributions they make about their conflict experiences across time, partners, and situations. Agreeableness and openness were related to reports of relationship conflict at the individual level. However, the strongest effects of personality on conflict attributions were found in the analysis of dyads. This analysis revealed that partner levels of extraversion and conscientiousness were associated with individuals' tendencies to report relationship conflict. Moreover, mean levels of extraversion and conscientiousness in a pair were associated with reports of relationship conflict. Differences between partners in extraversion were associated with more frequent conflict and a greater likelihood of reporting task-related conflict. Implications of these findings with respect to the role of personality in interpersonal relationships are discussed. Finally, these studies provide confirmatory evidence that conflict attributions have a meaningful impact on relationship satisfaction. [source]


General and Specific Traits of Personality and Their Relation to Sleep and Academic Performance

JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2002
Elizabeth K. Gray
ABSTRACT Few studies have examined the links between personality variables and sleep and their combined effect on specific real-world outcomes. Participants in this study completed numerous personality, sleep, and performance measures; we examined the associations among these measures. Personality was assessed using the Five-Factor Model. The personality trait of Conscientiousness (especially its facet of Achievement Striving) was a substantial predictor of academic performance. Analyses of the sleep variables revealed three distinct constructs: quantity, quality, and schedule. Sleep quantity showed few interesting correlates. In contrast, sleep quality was associated with greater well-being and improved psychological functioning, whereas sleep schedule (i.e., average rising and retiring times) was significantly related to Conscientiousness, such that conscientious individuals maintain earlier schedules. [source]


Trait Psychology and Culture: Exploring Intercultural Comparisons

JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 6 2001
Robert R. McCrae
Personality traits, studied for decades by Western personality psychologists, have recently been reconceptualized as endogenous basic tendencies that, within a cultural context, give rise to habits, attitudes, skills, beliefs, and other characteristic adaptations. This conceptualization provides a new framework for studying personality and culture at three levels. Transcultural research focuses on identifying human universals, such as trait structure and development; intracultural studies examine the unique expression of traits in specific cultures; and intercultural research characterizes cultures and their subgroups in terms of mean levels of personality traits and seeks associations between cultural variables and aggregate personality traits. As an example of the problems and possibilities of intercultural analyses, data on mean levels of Revised NEO Personality Inventory scales from college age and adult samples (N = 23,031) of men and women from 26 cultures are examined. Results showed that age and gender differences resembled those found in American samples; different subsamples from each culture showed similar levels of personality traits; intercultural factor analysis yielded a close approximation to the Five-Factor Model; and factor scores were meaningfully related to other culture-level variables. However, mean trait levels were not apparent to expert raters, casting doubt on the accuracy of national stereotypes. Trait psychology can serve as a useful complement to cultural perspectives on human nature and personality. [source]


A Structured Interview for the Assessment of the Five-Factor Model of Personality: Facet-Level Relations to the Axis II Personality Disorders

JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2001
Timothy J. Trull
The Structured Interview for the Five-Factor Model (SIFFM; Trull & Widiger, 1997) is an 120-item semistructured interview that assesses both adaptive and maladaptive features of the personality traits included in the five-factor model of personality, or "Big Five." In this article, we evaluate the ability of SIFFM scores to predict personality disorder symptomatology in a sample of 232 adults (46 outpatients and 186 nonclinical college students). Personality disorder symptoms were assessed using the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-Revised (PDQ-R; Hyler & Rider, 1987). Results indicated that many of the predicted associations between lower-order personality traits and personality disorders were supported. Further, many of these associations held even after controlling for comorbid personality disorder symptoms. These findings may help inform conceptualizations of the personality disorders, as well as etiological theories and treatment. [source]


Medical students' personality characteristics and academic performance: a five-factor model perspective

MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 11 2002
Filip Lievens
Objectives, This study investigates: (1) which personality traits are typical of medical students as compared to other students, and (2) which personality traits predict medical student performance in pre-clinical years. Design, This paper reports a cross-sectional inventory study of students in nine academic majors and a prospective longitudinal study of one cohort of medical students assessed by inventory during their first preclinical year and by university examination at the end of each pre-clinical year. Subjects and methods In 1997, a combined total of 785 students entered medical studies courses in five Flemish universities. Of these, 631 (804%) completed the NEO-PI-R (i.e. a measure of the Five-Factor Model of Personality). This was also completed by 914 Year 1 students of seven other academic majors at Ghent University. Year end scores for medical students were obtained for 607 students in Year 1, for 413 in Year 2, and for 341 in Year 3. Results, Medical studies falls into the group of majors where students score highest on extraversion and agreeableness. Conscientiousness (i.e. self-achievement and self-discipline) significantly predicts final scores in each pre-clinical year. Medical students who score low on conscientiousness and high on gregariousness and excitement-seeking are significantly less likely to sit examinations successfully. Conclusions, The higher scores for extraversion and agreeableness, two dimensions defining the interpersonal dynamic, may be beneficial for doctors' collaboration and communication skills in future professional practice. Because conscientiousness affects examination results and can be reliably assessed at the start of a medical study career, personality assessment may be a useful tool in student counselling and guidance. [source]


Comparative gender biases in models of personality disorder

PERSONALITY AND MENTAL HEALTH, Issue 1 2009
Douglas B. Samuel
The potential of gender bias within the DSM personality disorders has long been a concern of scholars and clinicians. Over the past three decades, research findings utilizing the case vignette methodology have repeatedly indicated a gender bias within the histrionic diagnosis. The current study replicates these findings using a novel case vignette, but extends them to investigate the potential for gender biases within an alternative dimensional model of personality,the Five-Factor Model (FFM). One hundred and forty-one practicing clinicians rated either a male or a female version of a case vignette in terms of either the FFM or the personality disorders from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR). The results supported the concern of gender bias, with the female case less likely to be diagnosed as antisocial and the male case less likely to be diagnosed as histrionic. However, when the FFM conceptualizations of these two disorders were compared, no significant differences were noted. The results indicate that the FFM may be less prone to gender bias than the current DSM nomenclature. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Factorial validity of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire in men and women

DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY, Issue 4 2001
Kristi D. Wright B.A.
Abstract In an effort to confirm the factorial validity of the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) across sex, the items from the CTQ for 916 university students were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis. Results indicated that the factor structure for the CTQ was significantly different for men and women. For women, the items from the Physical Abuse subscale did not create a stable factor and thus appear not to be conceptually valid. Conversely, for men, the five-factor model provided a relatively good fit to the data. This investigation provides important information regarding sex differences in the factorial validity of the CTQ. Implications and future research directions are discussed. Depression and Anxiety 13:179,183, 2001. 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Cross-cultural assessment of eating disorders: psychometric properties of a Spanish version of the Bulimia Test-Revised,

EUROPEAN EATING DISORDERS REVIEW, Issue 6 2007
Mayra N. Berrios-Hernandez
Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of a Spanish version of the Bulimia Test-Revised (BULIT-R). The goal was to test the factor-structure equivalence of the BULIT-R across two samples of college students from two different cultures, Spain and the US. Researchers using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) have reported different model solutions for the factor-structure of the BULIT-R: a one-factor model, a four-factor model, a five-factor model and a six-factor model. For the two samples, CFA did not support any of the models previously reported in the literature. EFA supported a six- and a four-factor models for the US and Spanish samples, respectively. 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. [source]


The personality basis of justice: The five-factor model as an integrative model of personality and procedural fairness effects on cooperation

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 6 2008
Alain Van Hiel
Abstract Building upon the self-based model of cooperation (De Cremer & Tyler, 2005), the present study investigates the relationship between the five-factor model (FFM) and cooperation. Study 1 (N,=,56), an experiment conducted in the laboratory, and Study 2 (N,=,116), a field study conducted in an organisational context, yielded a moderator effect between neuroticism and procedural fairness in explaining cooperation. Study 3 (N,=,177) showed that this moderator effect was mediated by the self-uncertainty and relational variables proposed by the self-based model of cooperation. It is concluded that the FFM is useful in explaining cooperation and contributes to a better understanding of (procedural) fairness effects. Moreover, the necessity to build integrative, multi-level models that combine core and surface aspects of personality to explain the effects of fairness on cooperation is elaborated upon. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


The intervening role of social worldviews in the relationship between the five-factor model of personality and social attitudes

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2007
A. Van Hiel
Abstract The present research investigates in a student (N,=,183) and a voter sample (N,=,276) whether the relationships between the Five-Factor Model (FFM) personality dimensions and social attitudes (i.e. Right-Wing Authoritarianism [RWA] and Social Dominance Orientation [SDO]) are mediated by social worldviews (i.e. dangerous and jungle worldviews). Two important results were obtained. First, the perception of the world as inherently dangerous and chaotic partially mediated the relationships of the personality dimensions Openness and Neuroticism and the social attitude RWA. Second, the jungle worldview completely mediated the relationships between Agreeableness and SDO, but considerable item overlap between the jungle worldview and SDO was also noted. It was further revealed that acquiescence response set and item overlap had an impact on social worldviews and attitudes, but that their relationships were hardly affected by these biases. The discussion focuses on the status of social worldviews to explain social attitudes. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Neediness and connectedness and the five-factor model of personality

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 2 2006
David M. Dunkley
Abstract This study examined maladaptive and relatively more adaptive forms of dependency, as measured by the neediness and connectedness factors of the Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (DEQ; Blatt, D'Afflitti, & Quinlan, 1976), within a comprehensive scheme of personality provided by the revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992). University students (n,=,475) completed the DEQ, NEO-PI-R, and a measure of depressive symptoms. Results indicated that neediness reflected anxiety, self-consciousness, vulnerability, unassertiveness, and inactivity, whereas connectedness reflected anxiety, warmth, agreeableness, and valuing of relationships. Neediness demonstrated stronger relations than connectedness with depressive symptoms. These results support the validity of DEQ neediness and connectedness as measures of maladaptive and relatively more adaptive forms of dependency. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Graphical analyses of personality disorders in five-factor model space

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 4 2005
Brian P. O'ConnorArticle first published online: 22 JUN 200
Current knowledge of the associations between personality disorders (PDs) and the five-factor model (FFM) is based largely on the results of linear correlation statistics. Yet we do not know whether FFM,PD associations are indeed linear, and correlational statistics are not directly informative regarding the FFM deviations of individuals with PDs. In this study, graphical analyses of FFM,PD associations for a large, clinical and nonclinical combined sample revealed a diversity of linear and nonlinear FFM patterns, at both the domain and facet levels, for most PDs. However, the FFM deviations from normative levels were only moderate. The discussion focuses on the strengths and weaknesses of the FFM approach to PDs. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Major depression, chronic minor depression, and the five-factor model of personality

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 4 2002
Kate L. Harkness
Fifty-eight outpatients with major depression completed the NEO Personality Inventory at intake (time 1) and after up to three months of anti-depressant treatment (time 2). Within this group, 26 patients met additional Research Diagnostic Criteria for chronic minor depression. Repeated-measures analyses revealed significant decreases in Neuroticism scores, and significant increases in Extraversion and Conscientiousness scores, from time 1 to time 2 for both patient groups. In addition, despite similar symptom severity at time 2, the patients with major depression+chronic minor depression scored significantly higher on the Angry Hostility facet of Neuroticism and significantly lower on Agreeableness than those with major depression alone. We suggest from these findings that Angry Hostility and low Agreeableness may represent a trait vulnerability in individuals with chronic minor depression that persists even following remission of the major depressive state, and that this may help to explain their high rates of relapse and recurrence. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Thinking styles and the five-factor model of personality

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Issue 6 2001
Li-fang Zhang
The primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between thinking styles and the big five personality dimensions. Four hundred and eight (149 males, 259 females) university students from Shanghai, mainland China, responded to the Thinking Styles Inventory and the NEO Five-Factor Inventory. It was found that thinking styles and personality dimensions overlap to a degree. As predicted, the more creativity-generating and more complex thinking styles were related to the extraversion and openness personality dimensions, and the more norm-favouring and simplistic thinking styles were related to neuroticism. No specific pattern was identified in the relationships of thinking styles to the agreeableness and conscientiousness dimensions. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Personality Testing and Industrial,Organizational Psychology: Reflections, Progress, and Prospects

INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 3 2008
LEAETTA M. HOUGH
As the title suggests, this article takes a broad perspective on personality as it is conceptualized and measured in organizational research, and in the spirit of this Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology journal, we framed the article as a series of 7 questions. These 7 questions deal with (1) personality and multidimensional models of performance, (2) personality taxonomies and the five-factor model, (3) the effects of situations on personality,performance relationships, (4) the incremental validity of personality over cognitive ability, (5) the need to differentiate personality constructs from personality measures, (6) the concern with faking on personality tests, and (7) the use of personality tests in attempting to address adverse impact. We dovetail these questions with our perspectives and insights in the hope that this will stimulate further discussion with our readership. [source]


Resilience in relation to personality and intelligence

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF METHODS IN PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, Issue 1 2005
Oddgeir Friborg
Abstract Resilience is a construct of increasing interest, but validated scales measuring resilience factors among adults are scarce. Here, a scale named the Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA) was crossvalidated and compared with measures of personality (Big Five/5PFs), cognitive abilities (Raven's Advanced Matrices, Vocabulary, Number series), and social intelligence (TSIS). All measures were given to 482 applicants for the military college. Confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the fit of the five-factor model, measuring ,personal strength', ,social competence', ,structured style', ,family cohesion' and ,social resources'. Using Big Five to discriminate between well adjusted and more vulnerable personality profiles, all resilience factors were positively correlated with the well adjusted personality profile. RSA-personal strength was most associated with 5PFs-emotional stability, RSA-social competence with 5PFs-extroversion and 5PFs-agreeableness, as well as TSIS-social skills, RSA-structured style with 5PFs-conscientiousness. Unexpectedly but interestingly, measures of RSA-family cohesion and RSA-social resources were also related to personality. Furthermore, the RSA was unrelated to cognitive abilities. This study supported the convergent and discriminative validity of the scale, and thus the inference that individuals scoring high on this scale are psychologically healthier, better adjusted, and thus more resilient. Copyright 2005 Whurr Publishers Ltd. [source]


Integrity Tests and the Five-Factor Model of Personality: A Review and Empirical Test of Two Alternative Positions

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SELECTION AND ASSESSMENT, Issue 2 2006
Bernd Marcus
The psychological meaning of integrity test scores has been explored predominantly in relation to the five-factor model of personality (FFM). Two alternative positions on this topic can be identified in the literature which state, respectively, that integrity tests measure (a) a higher-order factor of personality covering three FFM dimensions or (b) a linear composite of numerous facets from various domains within the FFM. An empirical test of these alternative positions, using structural equation modeling, revealed that the value of both views depended on the type of integrity test examined. With a personality-based integrity test, position (a) had to be refuted, whereas position (b) was strongly supported. There was also more supportive evidence for position (b) with an overt test, but the difference was far less pronounced than for the personality-based measure. Possible consequences for theories on the role of personality in personnel selection are discussed. [source]


Predicting General Well-Being From Emotional Intelligence and Three Broad Personality Traits

JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 3 2008
Malika Singh
This paper examined the joint predictive effects of trait emotional intelligence (trait-EI), Extraversion, Conscientiousness, and Neuroticism on 2 facets of general well-being and job satisfaction. An employed community sample of 123 individuals from the Indian subcontinent participated in the study, and completed measures of the five-factor model of personality, trait-EI, job satisfaction, and general well-being facets worn-out and up-tight. Trait-EI was related but distinct from the 3 personality variables. Trait-EI demonstrated the strongest correlation with job satisfaction, but predicted general well-being no better than Neuroticism. In regression analyses, trait-EI predicted between 6% and 9% additional variance in the well-being criteria, beyond the 3 personality traits. It was concluded that trait-EI may be useful in examining dispositional influences on psychological well-being. [source]


Coping and responses to stress in Navajo adolescents: Psychometric properties of the Responses to Stress Questionnaire

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 4 2004
Martha E. Wadsworth
This study tested the factor structure of coping and stress responses in Navajo adolescents and examined the reliability and validity of the Responses to Stress Questionnaire (RSQ; Connor-Smith, Compas, Wadsworth, Thomsen, & Saltzman, 2000) with this population. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed that a correlated five-factor model of stress responses using the five factors of the RSQ fit the data well for this group of adolescents. The factor structure of the RSQ did not differ by gender. Internal consistency of the RSQ scales and factors was acceptable, and convergent and discriminant validity were moderate to high. Primary and secondary control engagement coping responses were associated with fewer depressive symptoms in the sample, whereas disengagement coping and involuntary engagement responses were associated with more depressive symptoms. The promising implications for stress and coping research with American Indian adolescents are emphasized. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comm Psychol 32: 391,411, 2004. [source]


Personality and intimate partner aggression in dating relationships: the role of the "Big Five"

AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, Issue 6 2008
Denise A. Hines
Abstract Although personality is shown to predict negative relationship experiences, few researchers have used a structural model of personality to study the ways that personality contributes to intimate partner aggression (IPA). This study investigates the five-factor model of personality and its associations with both the use and receipt of psychological, physical, and sexual IPA in 179 men and 301 women. Each of the five factors of personality was associated with at least one type of IPA perpetration or victimization. The dimensions of neuroticism and agreeableness were the strongest predictors of IPA particularly for women. Results are discussed in terms of why personality should be considered as a predictor for both the use and receipt of IPA, why sex differences emerged, and future research that should be conducted. Aggr. Behav. 34:593,604, 2008. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Development and testing of the velicer attitudes toward violence scale: evidence for a four-factor model

AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, Issue 2 2006
Craig A. Anderson
Abstract The factor structure of the Velicer Attitudes Toward Violence Scale [VATVS; Velicer, Huckel and Hansen, 1989] was examined in three studies. Study 1 (n=460 undergraduates) found a poor fit for a hierarchical five-factor model earlier advanced by Velicer et al. [1989], but a good fit for an oblique four-factor model. In Study 2, this alternative model was cross-validated in a confirmatory factor analysis of an additional 195 undergraduate students. In Study 3, the competing models were compared in terms of ability to predict self-reported aggression, with 823 undergraduate students. The new four-factor model proved superior. Other findings included evidence of factorial invariance on the VATVS, and more favorable attitudes toward violence among men than women. The VATVS appears to measure the same four attitudinal constructs for men and women: violence in war, penal code violence, corporal punishment of children, and intimate violence. Aggr. Behav. 32:122,136, 2006. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]