Airtraq Laryngoscope (airtraq + laryngoscope)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Use of a fiberoptic bronchoscope to facilitate tracheal intubation after failed intubation using the Airtraq® laryngoscope

ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 2 2010
F. S. Xue
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Performance of the AirtraqÔ laryngoscope after failed conventional tracheal intubation: a case series

ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 7 2009
E. MALIN
Background: The AirtraqÔ, a new disposable indirect laryngoscope, was evaluated in patients with difficult intubation. Methods: The AirtraqÔ was used in 47 patients with predicted or unpredicted difficult intubation after failed orotracheal intubation performed by two senior anaesthesiologists with the Macintosh laryngoscope. Results: Tracheal intubation with AirtraqÔ was successful in 36 patients (80%). The Cormack and Lehane score was IIb,III in 35 patients, and IV in 12 patients, with the Macintosh laryngoscope, while Cormack and Lehane score was I,IIa in 40 patients, IIb,III in three and IV in four with AirtraqÔ. A gum elastic bougie was used to facilitate tracheal access in one-third (11/36) of the cases. Orotracheal intubation was not possible with AirtraqÔ in nine cases, five of whom had a pharyngeal, laryngeal or basal lingual tumour. Conclusion: In patients with difficult airway, following failed conventional orotracheal intubation, AirtraqÔ allows securing the airway in 80% of cases mainly by improving glottis view. However, the AirtraqÔ does not guarantee successful intubation in all instances, especially in case of laryngeal and/or pharyngeal obstruction. [source]


Awake tracheal intubation using the Airtraq® laryngoscope: a case series

ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 7 2009
V. K. DIMITRIOU
The Airtraq® laryngoscope (AL) is a new single use indirect laryngoscope designed to facilitate tracheal intubation in anaesthetised patients either with normal or difficult airway anatomy. It is designed to provide a view of the glottis without alignment of the oral, pharyngeal and tracheal axes. We report four cases of successful awake tracheal intubation using the AL. The first case is a patient with severe ankylosing spondylitis and the other three cases with anticipated difficult airway. An awake intubation under sedation and topical airway anaesthesia was chosen. We consider that the AL can be used effectively to accomplish an awake intubation in patients with a suspected or known difficult airway and may be a useful alternative where other methods for awake intubation have failed or are not available. [source]


More maneuvers to facilitate endotracheal intubation using the Airtraq® laryngoscope in children with difficult airways

PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA, Issue 9 2009
Fu S. Xue
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Airtraq laryngoscope for bronchial blocker placement in a difficult airway

ANAESTHESIA, Issue 6 2009
G. DeGregoris
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Optimising tracheal intubation success rate using the Airtraq laryngoscope

ANAESTHESIA, Issue 3 2009
G. Dhonneur
Summary In this study we have used a video-recording, retrospective analysis technique to evaluate the influence of the AirtraqÔ laryngoscope manipulations and the resulting changes in position of the glottic opening and inter-arytenoids cleft, on the success rate of tracheal intubation. The video recordings of the internal views of 109 tracheal intubation attempts, in 50 anaesthetised patients were analysed. We demonstrated that successful tracheal intubation using the Airtraq laryngoscope require the glottic opening to be centred in the view, and positioning the inter-arytenoid cleft medially below the horizontal line in the centre of the view. We also demonstrated that repositioning of the Airtraq laryngoscope following a failed tracheal intubation attempt required the performance of a standard series of manoeuvres. [source]


Correspondence: Comparison of the C-MAC® videolaryngoscope with the Macintosh, Glidescope® and Airtraq® laryngoscopes in easy and difficult laryngoscopy scenarios in manikins

ANAESTHESIA, Issue 9 2010
R. Maassen
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Tracheal intubation in daylight and in the dark: a randomised comparison of the Airway Scope®, Airtraq®, and Macintosh laryngoscope in a manikin

ANAESTHESIA, Issue 7 2010
H. Ueshima
Summary Fifteen anaesthetists attempted to intubate the trachea of a manikin lying supine on the ground using the Airway Scope®, Airtraq® or Macintosh laryngoscope in three simulated conditions: (1) in room light; (2) in the dark and (3) in daylight. The main outcome measure was the time to ventilate the lungs after successful intubation; the secondary outcome was the success rate of ventilation within 30 s. In room light and in the dark, ventilation after successful tracheal intubation could always be achieved within 30 s for all three devices. There were no clinically meaningful differences in time to ventilate between the three devices. In daylight, time to ventilate the lungs for the Airway Scope was significantly longer than for the Macintosh blade (p < 0.0001; 95% CI for difference 27.5,65.0 s) and for the Airtraq (p < 0.0001; 95% CI for difference 29.2,67.6 s). Ventilation was always successful for the Macintosh and Airtraq laryngoscopes, but for the Airway Scope, only one of 15 participants could successfully ventilate the lungs (p < 0.0001). Therefore, the Airway Scope may have a role for tracheal intubation under room light or in darkness, but may not be so useful in daylight. In contrast, the Airtraq may have a role in both darkness and daylight. [source]


Comparison of the C-MAC® videolaryngoscope with the Macintosh, Glidescope®, and Airtraq® laryngoscopes in easy and difficult laryngoscopy scenarios in manikins

ANAESTHESIA, Issue 5 2010
J. McElwain
Summary The C-MAC® comprises a Macintosh blade connected to a video unit. The familiarity of the Macintosh blade, and the ability to use the C-MAC as a direct or indirect laryngoscope, may be advantageous. We wished to compare the C-MAC with Macintosh, Glidescope® and Airtraq® laryngoscopes in easy and simulated difficult laryngoscopy. Thirty-one experienced anaesthetists performed tracheal intubation in an easy and difficult laryngoscopy scenario. The duration of intubation attempts, success rates, number of intubation attempts and of optimisation manoeuvres, the severity of dental compression, and difficulty of device use were recorded. In easy laryngoscopy, the duration of tracheal intubation attempts were similar with the C-MAC, Macintosh and Airtraq laryngoscopes; the Glidescope performed less well. The C-MAC and Airtraq provided the best glottic views, but the C-MAC was rated as the easiest device to use. In difficult laryngo-scopy the C-MAC demonstrated the shortest tracheal intubation times. The Airtraq provided the best glottic view, with the Macintosh providing the worst view. The C-MAC was the easiest device to use. [source]