Faculty Practice (faculty + practice)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Effectiveness of hepatitis C treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in urban minority patients,

HEPATOLOGY, Issue 4 2010
Paul Feuerstadt
Randomized controlled trials of hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin have demonstrated sustained viral response rates (SVRs) of 54%-63% (efficacy). Treatment results in clinical practice (effectiveness) may not be equivalent. The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of HCV treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in a treatment-na´ve, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative, United States urban population with many ethnic minority patients. We evaluated 2,370 outpatients for HCV therapy from 2001 to 2006 in the Faculty Practice of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine or the attending-supervised Montefiore Medical Center Liver Clinic. Care was supervised by one experienced physician under conditions of everyday clinical practice, and appropriate ancillary resources were made available to all patients. Two hundred fifty-five patients were treated with a mean age of 50 years (60% male, 40% female; 58% Hispanic, 20% African American, 9% Caucasian, 13% other; 68% genotype 1, the remainder genotypes 2 or 3). Patients had at least one liver biopsy. Intention-to-treat analysis (ITT) showed SVR in 14% of genotype 1 patients and 37% in genotype 2/3 patients (P < 0.001). SVR was significantly higher in faculty practice (27%) than in clinic patients (15%) by intention-to-treat (P = 0.01) but not per-protocol analysis (46% faculty practice, 34% clinic). 3.3% of 1,656 treatment-na´ve, HIV antibody,negative individuals ultimately achieved SVR. Current hepatitis C therapies may sometimes be unavailable to, inappropriate for, and ineffective in United States urban patients. Treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin was less effective in this population than is implied by multinational phase III controlled trials. New strategies are needed to care for such patients. (HEPATOLOGY 2010.) [source]


A Win,Win Model for an Academic Nursing Center: Community Partnership Faculty Practice

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2002
Stella Shiber Ph.D.
A number of schools of nursing have established community nursing centers to provide faculty practice sites, student learning experiences, and a service to the community, most often to a poor underserved population. The current literature concludes that these centers provide a quality clinical service and improve access to health care, and they also provide an avenue for research, training, and faculty practice. Acquiring necessary financial support and the ability to achieve financial independence appear to be the most common difficulties for these centers. Most of the current literature includes an examination of issues relating to funding. The model presented in this article focuses on organizational variables that include both the center and its placement in relationship to other functions and programs in the school and a broadening of the meaning of fiscal responsibility to include an awareness of the broad spectrum of benefits that the community nursing center brings to the entire school. Efforts to coordinate and integrate the needs and functions of several groups are described. Establishing goals and priorities that simultaneously meet the needs of all or most of these groups has been an important outcome. The activities of the center have become an integral part of the everyday life of the school. Achieving financial independence and being fiscally aware and responsible is not the same thing. [source]


Effectiveness of hepatitis C treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in urban minority patients,

HEPATOLOGY, Issue 4 2010
Paul Feuerstadt
Randomized controlled trials of hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin have demonstrated sustained viral response rates (SVRs) of 54%-63% (efficacy). Treatment results in clinical practice (effectiveness) may not be equivalent. The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of HCV treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in a treatment-na´ve, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative, United States urban population with many ethnic minority patients. We evaluated 2,370 outpatients for HCV therapy from 2001 to 2006 in the Faculty Practice of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine or the attending-supervised Montefiore Medical Center Liver Clinic. Care was supervised by one experienced physician under conditions of everyday clinical practice, and appropriate ancillary resources were made available to all patients. Two hundred fifty-five patients were treated with a mean age of 50 years (60% male, 40% female; 58% Hispanic, 20% African American, 9% Caucasian, 13% other; 68% genotype 1, the remainder genotypes 2 or 3). Patients had at least one liver biopsy. Intention-to-treat analysis (ITT) showed SVR in 14% of genotype 1 patients and 37% in genotype 2/3 patients (P < 0.001). SVR was significantly higher in faculty practice (27%) than in clinic patients (15%) by intention-to-treat (P = 0.01) but not per-protocol analysis (46% faculty practice, 34% clinic). 3.3% of 1,656 treatment-na´ve, HIV antibody,negative individuals ultimately achieved SVR. Current hepatitis C therapies may sometimes be unavailable to, inappropriate for, and ineffective in United States urban patients. Treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin was less effective in this population than is implied by multinational phase III controlled trials. New strategies are needed to care for such patients. (HEPATOLOGY 2010.) [source]


A Win,Win Model for an Academic Nursing Center: Community Partnership Faculty Practice

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2002
Stella Shiber Ph.D.
A number of schools of nursing have established community nursing centers to provide faculty practice sites, student learning experiences, and a service to the community, most often to a poor underserved population. The current literature concludes that these centers provide a quality clinical service and improve access to health care, and they also provide an avenue for research, training, and faculty practice. Acquiring necessary financial support and the ability to achieve financial independence appear to be the most common difficulties for these centers. Most of the current literature includes an examination of issues relating to funding. The model presented in this article focuses on organizational variables that include both the center and its placement in relationship to other functions and programs in the school and a broadening of the meaning of fiscal responsibility to include an awareness of the broad spectrum of benefits that the community nursing center brings to the entire school. Efforts to coordinate and integrate the needs and functions of several groups are described. Establishing goals and priorities that simultaneously meet the needs of all or most of these groups has been an important outcome. The activities of the center have become an integral part of the everyday life of the school. Achieving financial independence and being fiscally aware and responsible is not the same thing. [source]