Faculty Perceptions (faculty + perception)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The Demands of 24/7 Coverage: Using Faculty Perceptions to Measure Fairness of the Schedule

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 1 2004
Frank L. Zwemer Jr. MD
Objectives: Ensuring fair, equitable scheduling of faculty who work 24-hour, 7-day-per-week (24/7) clinical coverage is a challenge for academic emergency medicine (EM). Because most emergency department care is at personally valuable times (evenings, weekends, nights), optimizing clinical work is essential for the academic mission. To evaluate schedule fairness, the authors developed objective criteria for stress of the schedule, modified the schedule to improve equality, and evaluated faculty perceptions. They hypothesized that improved equality would increase faculty satisfaction. Methods: Perceived stress was measured for types of clinical shifts. The seven daily shifts were classified as weekday, weekend, or holiday (plus one unique teaching-conference coverage shift). Faculty assigned perceived stress to shifts (ShiftStress) utilizing visual analog scales (VAS). Faculty schedules were measured (ShiftScores) for two years (1998,1999), and ShiftScore distribution of faculty was determined quarterly. Schedules were modified (1999) to reduce interindividual ShiftScore standard deviation (SD). The survey was performed pre- and postintervention. Results: Preintervention, 26 faculty (100% of eligible) assigned VAS to 22 shifts. Increased stress was perceived in progression (weekday data, 0,10 scale) from day to evening to night (2.07, 5.00, 6.67, respectively) and from weekday to weekend to holiday (day-shift data, 2.07, 4.93, 5.87). The intervention reduced interindividual ShiftScore SD by 21%. Postintervention survey revealed no change in perceived equality or satisfaction. Conclusions: Faculty perceived no improvement despite scheduling modifications that improved equality of the schedule and provided objective measures. Other predictors of stress, fairness, and satisfaction with the demanding clinical schedule must be identified to ensure the success of EM faculty. [source]


University faculty perceptions of the health risks related to cigarettes and smokeless tobacco

DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, Issue 2 2010
NICHOLAS PEIPER
Abstract Introduction and Aims. It is now widely understood by tobacco research and policy experts that smokeless tobacco (ST) use confers significantly less risk than smoking, but no studies have assessed tobacco risk perceptions in highly educated populations. The purpose of this study was to explore the perception of risks related to smoking and ST use among full-time faculty on two campuses at the University of Louisville. Design and Methods. In October 2007, a survey that quantified risk perceptions of cigarette smoking and ST use with respect to four health domains (general health, heart attack/stroke, all cancer, oral cancer) was sent to 1610 full-time faculty at the Belknap and the Health Sciences Center (HSC) campuses of the University of Louisville, and 597 (37%) returned a completed survey. Results. Overall, cigarettes were considered as high risk for all health domains by large majorities (75,97%). Except for heart attack/stroke, ST was also considered as high risk by the majority of faculty (69,87%), and at least half perceived cigarettes and ST to be equally harmful across all domains. HSC faculty had somewhat more accurate risk perceptions than Belknap faculty for ST, but both groups overestimated the risks, especially for oral cancer. Discussion and Conclusions. This study found that the risks of ST use are overestimated and conflated to that of cigarettes among highly educated professionals, demonstrating the need for better education about the risks of tobacco use and for communication of accurate information by health organisations and agencies.[Peiper N, Stone R, Van Zyl R & Rodu B. University faculty perceptions of the health risks related to cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. Drug Alcohol Rev 2010] [source]


The Demands of 24/7 Coverage: Using Faculty Perceptions to Measure Fairness of the Schedule

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 1 2004
Frank L. Zwemer Jr. MD
Objectives: Ensuring fair, equitable scheduling of faculty who work 24-hour, 7-day-per-week (24/7) clinical coverage is a challenge for academic emergency medicine (EM). Because most emergency department care is at personally valuable times (evenings, weekends, nights), optimizing clinical work is essential for the academic mission. To evaluate schedule fairness, the authors developed objective criteria for stress of the schedule, modified the schedule to improve equality, and evaluated faculty perceptions. They hypothesized that improved equality would increase faculty satisfaction. Methods: Perceived stress was measured for types of clinical shifts. The seven daily shifts were classified as weekday, weekend, or holiday (plus one unique teaching-conference coverage shift). Faculty assigned perceived stress to shifts (ShiftStress) utilizing visual analog scales (VAS). Faculty schedules were measured (ShiftScores) for two years (1998,1999), and ShiftScore distribution of faculty was determined quarterly. Schedules were modified (1999) to reduce interindividual ShiftScore standard deviation (SD). The survey was performed pre- and postintervention. Results: Preintervention, 26 faculty (100% of eligible) assigned VAS to 22 shifts. Increased stress was perceived in progression (weekday data, 0,10 scale) from day to evening to night (2.07, 5.00, 6.67, respectively) and from weekday to weekend to holiday (day-shift data, 2.07, 4.93, 5.87). The intervention reduced interindividual ShiftScore SD by 21%. Postintervention survey revealed no change in perceived equality or satisfaction. Conclusions: Faculty perceived no improvement despite scheduling modifications that improved equality of the schedule and provided objective measures. Other predictors of stress, fairness, and satisfaction with the demanding clinical schedule must be identified to ensure the success of EM faculty. [source]


Some Preparation Required: The Journey To Successful Studio Collaboration

JOURNAL OF INTERIOR DESIGN, Issue 2 2006
Jennifer D. Webb Ph.D.
ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between team training perceptions and training effectiveness among students and faculty. The three objectives for this project were: 1) compare student and faculty perceptions concerning the provision of team training in design studios; 2) investigate the relationship between students' reported team training levels and students' reported team attitudes; and 3) investigate the relationship between students' reported team training levels and students' reported team behaviors. IDEC members and their interior design students were selected to participate in the study. Questionnaires were mailed to the faculty and the instruments were administered in a manner similar to course evaluations. Chi Square analysis suggests that instructors were more likely than students to indicate that they had provided training on effective communication, task division, conflict resolution, and characteristics of a good team. The findings suggest that teamwork training is positively related to positive perceptions and attitudes about teamwork, and to proactive behaviors in team settings. Most importantly, findings indicate that participation in multiple team projects is not related to improved attitudes or behaviors. This result emphasizes the role of preparation in successful studio collaboration. [source]


Assessing and Documenting General Competencies in Otolaryngology Resident Training Programs,

THE LARYNGOSCOPE, Issue 5 2006
Rick M. Roark PhD
Abstract Objectives: The objectives of this study were to: 1) implement web-based instruments for assessing and documenting the general competencies of otolaryngology resident education, as outlined by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME); and 2) examine the benefit and validity of this online system for measuring educational outcomes and for identifying insufficiencies in the training program as they occur. Methods: We developed an online assessment system for a surgical postgraduate education program and examined its feasibility, usability, and validity. Evaluations of behaviors, skills, and attitudes of 26 residents were completed online by faculty, peers, and nonphysician professionals during a 3-year period. Analyses included calculation and evaluation of total average performance scores of each resident by different evaluators. Evaluations were also compared with American Board of Otolaryngology-administered in-service examination (ISE) scores for each resident. Convergent validity was examined statistically by comparing ratings among the different evaluator types. Results: Questionnaires and software were found to be simple to use and efficient in collecting essential information. From July 2002 to June 2005, 1,336 evaluation forms were available for analysis. The average score assigned by faculty was 4.31, significantly lower than that by nonphysician professionals (4.66) and residents evaluating peers (4.63) (P < .001), whereas scores were similar between nonphysician professionals and resident peers. Average scores between faculty and nonphysician groups showed correlation in constructs of communication and relationship with patients, but not in those of professionalism and documentation. Correlation was observed in respect for patients but not in medical knowledge between faculty and resident peer groups. Resident ISE scores improved in the third year of the study and demonstrated high correlation with faculty perceptions of medical knowledge (r = 0.65, P = .007). Conclusions: Compliance for completion of forms was 97%. The system facilitated the educational management of our training program along multiple dimensions. The small perceptual differences among a highly selected group of residents have made the unambiguous validation of the system challenging. The instruments and approach warrant further study. Improvements are likely best achieved in broad consultation among other otolaryngology programs. [source]