Aged Care Homes (aged + care_home)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The feasibility of developing a standards rating system for all Australian government aged care homes

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OLDER PEOPLE NURSING, Issue 2 2008
FRCNA, Susan Koch BA (Ed Studies)
Aims and objectives., The main objective of this project was to investigate the likelihood of creating an easily understood rating system for all aged care homes. A secondary objective was to canvas the feasibility of alternative systems that could better inform aged care consumers. Background., Standards rating systems are used internationally to enable comparisons in healthcare. In Australia, the performance of numerous services and products are measured according to the star system of ratings, yet despite their widespread use, star ratings remain absent from the healthcare industry. Methods., A National Consultative Group (NCG) consisting of key stakeholder representatives was consulted, and a literature review performed on existing standards (or ,star') rating systems. Telephone interviews were conducted with representatives from aged care homes, as well as consumers. Results., A standards rating system for aged care homes was not found to be feasible in the current climate. However, an alternative system that emphasises empowering aged care consumers, such as one that allows consumers to search for an aged care home using their own criteria of preference, was considered more feasible. Conclusion., The need for information to assist consumer choice , limited as it may be , is real. Ways of providing more consumer friendly, useful information need to be further explored and developed. Recommendations are made for future work in this area. [source]


Determinants of antipsychotic medication use among older people living in aged care homes in Australia

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 5 2010
Prasad S. Nishtala
Abstract Objective To investigate determinants of antipsychotic medication use among older people living in aged care homes in Australia. Design Retrospective study of a random sample of de-identified medication reports using cross-sectional data gathered between 1 January 2008 and 30 June 2008 in Australia. Subjects The mean (SD) age of the residents was 84.0 (9.0) years. Seventy-five per cent were females. Measures Resident demographics, clinical characteristics, medical diagnoses and prescribed medication were systematically recorded. Logistic regression (LR) models were used to determine predictors for any antipsychotic, atypical and conventional antipsychotic use. Results Twenty-three per cent of the residents were prescribed one or more antipsychotics. In the LR model, factors for predicting the odds ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) for any antipsychotic medication use were agitation (7.11, 95% CI 3.15,16.03), challenging behaviours (7.47, 95% CI 2.53,22.10), dementia (2.35, 95% CI 1.36,4.06), dementia with mood disorder (0.39, 95% CI 0.16,0.92), paranoia (6.70, 95% CI 1.08,41.55), psychosis (14.79, 95% CI 3.64,60.00) and any psychiatric diagnosis (3.30, 95% CI 1.82,6.00). Use of atypical antipsychotic medication was significant for agitation (4.58, 95% CI 2.05,10.23), aggression (2.25, 95% CI 1.05,4.78), challenging behaviours (8.01, 95% CI 2.76,23.24), dementia (3.64, 95% CI 1.99,6.67), dementia with mood disorder (0.16, 95% CI 0.06,0.43), psychosis (16.51, 95% CI 4.28,63.66) and any psychiatric diagnosis (4.44, 95% CI 2.33,8.46). Conclusions Psychiatric diagnosis, psychosis and dementia were associated with significantly greater odds for the use of antipsychotic medications. Older people suffering from dementia and comorbid mood disorders treated with antidepressants were less likely to be prescribed atypical antipsychotics. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


The feasibility of developing a standards rating system for all Australian government aged care homes

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OLDER PEOPLE NURSING, Issue 2 2008
FRCNA, Susan Koch BA (Ed Studies)
Aims and objectives., The main objective of this project was to investigate the likelihood of creating an easily understood rating system for all aged care homes. A secondary objective was to canvas the feasibility of alternative systems that could better inform aged care consumers. Background., Standards rating systems are used internationally to enable comparisons in healthcare. In Australia, the performance of numerous services and products are measured according to the star system of ratings, yet despite their widespread use, star ratings remain absent from the healthcare industry. Methods., A National Consultative Group (NCG) consisting of key stakeholder representatives was consulted, and a literature review performed on existing standards (or ,star') rating systems. Telephone interviews were conducted with representatives from aged care homes, as well as consumers. Results., A standards rating system for aged care homes was not found to be feasible in the current climate. However, an alternative system that emphasises empowering aged care consumers, such as one that allows consumers to search for an aged care home using their own criteria of preference, was considered more feasible. Conclusion., The need for information to assist consumer choice , limited as it may be , is real. Ways of providing more consumer friendly, useful information need to be further explored and developed. Recommendations are made for future work in this area. [source]


Are Older Workers Less Productive?

THE ECONOMIC RECORD, Issue 2010
A Case Study of Aged Care Workers in Australia
Employers are reluctant to employ older workers. Is this because they are less productive than equivalent younger workers? This paper uses data from a 2007 census of residential aged care homes in Australia to examine the productivity differentials of workers at different ages. We estimate production functions that take into account the age profile of the workforce in each aged care residential facility. We find that for the facilities having high care residents only, the productivity of nurses, whose work is more demanding of specialist knowledge, keeps increasing with age while the rate of increase declines after age 50. In contrast, the productivity of carers, whose work is more demanding of physical capacity, is highest in middle age. The facilities with low care residents only provide a much lower level of services because their residents are less frail and more independent. In this case, none of the coefficients regarding the impacts of age on productivity is statistically significant , suggesting that older workers are good substitutes for younger ones. [source]