Event Intensity (event + intensity)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


PRECIPITATION CHANGES FROM 1956 TO 1996 ON THE WALNUT GULCH EXPERIMENTAL WATERSHED,

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION, Issue 1 2002
Mary H. Nichols
ABSTRACT: The climate of Southern Arizona is dominated by summer precipitation, which accounts for over 60 percent of the annual total. Summer and non-summer precipitation data from the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed are analyzed to identify trends in precipitation characteristics from 1956 to 1996. During this period, annual precipitation increased. The annual precipitation increase can be attributed to an increase in precipitation during non-summer months, and is paralleled by an increase in the proportion of annual precipitation contributed during non-summer months. This finding is consistent with previously reported increases in non-summer precipitation in the southwestern United States. Detailed event data were analyzed to provide insight into the characteristics of precipitation events during this time period. Precipitation event data were characterized based on the number of events, event precipitation amount, 30-minute event intensity, and event duration. The trend in non-summer precipitation appears to be a result of increased event frequency since the number of events increased during nonsummer months, although the average amount per event, average event intensity, and average event duration did not. During the summer "monsoon" season, the frequency of recorded precipitation events increased but the average precipitation amount per event decreased. Knowledge of precipitation trends and the characteristics of events that make up a precipitation time series is a critical first step in understanding and managing water resources in semiarid ecosystems. [source]


EWMA techniques for computer intrusion detection through anomalous changes in event intensity

QUALITY AND RELIABILITY ENGINEERING INTERNATIONAL, Issue 6 2002
Nong Ye
Abstract Intrusion detection is used to monitor and capture intrusions into computer and network systems, which attempt to compromise the security of computer and network systems. To protect information systems from intrusions and thus assure the reliability and quality of service of information systems, it is highly desirable to develop techniques that detect intrusions into information systems. Many intrusions manifest in dramatic changes in the intensity of events occurring in information systems. Because of the ability of exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts to monitor the rate of occurrences of events based on the their intensity, we apply three EWMA statistics to detect anomalous changes in the events intensity for intrusion detections. They include the EWMA chart for autocorrelated data, the EWMA chart for uncorrelated data and the EWMA chart for monitoring the process standard deviation. The objectives of this paper are to provide design procedures for realizing these control charts and investigate their performance using different parameter settings based on one large dataset. The early detection capability of these EWMA techniques is also examined to provide the guidance about the design capacity of information systems. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Alteration and Reformation of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs and Prediction of Remaining Potential Resources in Superimposed Basins

ACTA GEOLOGICA SINICA (ENGLISH EDITION), Issue 5 2010
PANG Hong
Abstract: Complex hydrocarbon reservoirs developed widely in the superimposed basins of China formed from multiple structural alterations, reformation and destruction of hydrocarbon reservoirs formed at early stages. They are characterized currently by trap adjustment, component variation, phase conversion, and scale reformation. This is significant for guiding current hydrocarbon exploration by revealing evolution mechanisms after hydrocarbon reservoir formation and for predicting remaining potential resources. Based on the analysis of a number of complex hydrocarbon reservoirs, there are four geologic features controlling the degree of destruction of hydrocarbon reservoirs formed at early stages: tectonic event intensity, frequency, time and caprock sealing for oil and gas during tectonic evolution. Research shows that the larger the tectonic event intensity, the more frequent the tectonic event, the later the last tectonic event, the weaker the caprock sealing for oil and gas, and the greater the volume of destroyed hydrocarbons in the early stages. Based on research on the main controlling factors of hydrocarbon reservoir destruction mechanisms, a geological model of tectonic superimposition and a mathematical model evaluating potential remaining complex hydrocarbon reservoirs have been established. The predication method and technical procedures were applied in the Tazhong area of Tarim Basin, where four stages of hydrocarbon accumulation and three stages of hydrocarbon alteration occurred. Geohistorical hydrocarbon accumulation reached 3.184 billion tons, of which 1.271 billion tons were destroyed. The total volume of remaining resources available for exploration is ,1.9 billion tons. [source]


EWMA techniques for computer intrusion detection through anomalous changes in event intensity

QUALITY AND RELIABILITY ENGINEERING INTERNATIONAL, Issue 6 2002
Nong Ye
Abstract Intrusion detection is used to monitor and capture intrusions into computer and network systems, which attempt to compromise the security of computer and network systems. To protect information systems from intrusions and thus assure the reliability and quality of service of information systems, it is highly desirable to develop techniques that detect intrusions into information systems. Many intrusions manifest in dramatic changes in the intensity of events occurring in information systems. Because of the ability of exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts to monitor the rate of occurrences of events based on the their intensity, we apply three EWMA statistics to detect anomalous changes in the events intensity for intrusion detections. They include the EWMA chart for autocorrelated data, the EWMA chart for uncorrelated data and the EWMA chart for monitoring the process standard deviation. The objectives of this paper are to provide design procedures for realizing these control charts and investigate their performance using different parameter settings based on one large dataset. The early detection capability of these EWMA techniques is also examined to provide the guidance about the design capacity of information systems. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]