Ethylene Treatment (ethylene + treatment)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


STORAGE QUALITY of ETHYLENE TREATED ,ANJOU' and ,BOSC WINTER PEARS

JOURNAL OF FOOD PROCESSING AND PRESERVATION, Issue 5 2000
S.R. DRAKE
,Anjou' and ,Bosc' pears (Pyrus communis, L.) were harvested one to two days prior to commercial harvest from three orchards in the Wenatchee growing district of Washington. Harvested fruit were treated with 300 ppm ethylene for three days at 20C. Ethylene treatment enhanced yellow color on fruit peel and the reduction of flesh firmness, and increased spoilage after 90 days in either regular atmosphere (RA) storage or controlled atmosphere (CA) storage regardless of cultivar. Ethylene-treated fruit, of both cultivars, stored in CA had a longer storage life than fruit stored in RA. the safe storage period of ethylene-treated ,Anjou'and ,Bosc' pears was 90 and 45 days, respectively, in RA and 120 and 90 days, respectively, in CA. [source]


Calcium requirement for ethylene-dependent responses involving 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid oxidase in radicle tissues of germinated pea seeds,

PLANT CELL & ENVIRONMENT, Issue 5 2003
L. PETRUZZELLI
ABSTRACT The Ca2+ requirements of ethylene-dependent responses were investigated in germinating seeds of Pisum sativum L. using 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase (Ps-ACO1), ACC synthase (Ps-ACS2) and class I , -1,3-glucanase as molecular markers. Ethylene biosynthesis and responsiveness are localized to the elongation and differentiation zones of the pea radicle. Ethylene treatment induced ectopic root hair formation in the cell elongation zone and promoted root hair elongation growth in the radicles of germinated seeds. Characterized Ca2+ antagonists, including EGTA, lanthanum, verapamil, ruthenium red, W-7, lithium and neomycin, were used to test for the involvement of the apoplastic and the intracellular Ca2+ -pool, the Ca2+/calmodulin complex and the phoshoinositide (PI) cycle in the ethylene responses. Ca2+ release from internal pools, but no appreciabe apoplastic Ca2+, is involved in the transcriptional induction by ethylene of Ps-ACO1 and in ectopic root hair formation in the radicle elongation zone of germinated pea seeds. Furthermore, the Ca2+/calmodulin complex and the PI cycle seem to be involved in these ethylene responses. In contrast, both the intracellular and the apoplastic Ca2+ -pools are required for the negative and positive ethylene responses to the gene expression of PS-ACS2 and class I , -1,3-glucanase, respectively; and, apoplastic Ca2+ also promotes root hair elongation growth. Tissues from adult plants and germinating seeds exhibit temporal and spatial differences in the signal/response coupling by Ca2+ of ethylene-regulated processes. [source]


The effects on the quality of Cavendish bananas, which have been treated with ethylene, of exposure to 1-methylcyclopropene

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, Issue 7 2003
N. Bagnato
Summary After 48 h of ethylene treatment (300 ,L L,1), to induce ripening of mature, green bananas (Musa sp., AAA type, Cavendish subgroup, cv. Williams), fruit were exposed to 0 (control), 3, 300 nL L,1, or 30 ,L L,1 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) for 24, 48 or 72 h at 20 °C. Bananas treated with 300 nL L,1 1-MCP had a 6-day shelf-life compared with 3 days for non-treated fruit, and 4 days for fruit treated with 3 nL L,1 1-MCP. Increased shelf-life (half-ripe to over-ripe) occurred without affecting the green life (unripe to half-ripe) of bananas, peel appearance, pulp texture, soluble solid concentrations or aroma profiles. Fruit treated with 30 ,L L,1 were externally and internally commercially unacceptable, as fruit developed crown rot prior to ripening. Application of 1-MCP at suitable concentrations could extend banana shelf-life, by enhancing marketing and consumer expectations without compromising banana quality. [source]


Ethylene-induced hyponastic growth in Arabidopsis thaliana is controlled by ERECTA

THE PLANT JOURNAL, Issue 1 2010
Martijn Van Zanten
Summary Plants can respond quickly and profoundly to detrimental changes in their environment. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana can induce an upward leaf movement response through differential petiole growth (hyponastic growth) to outgrow complete submergence. This response is induced by accumulation of the phytohormone ethylene in the plant. Currently, only limited information is available on how this response is molecularly controlled. In this study, we utilized quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of natural genetic variation among Arabidopsis accessions to isolate novel factors controlling constitutive petiole angles and ethylene-induced hyponastic growth. Analysis of mutants in various backgrounds and complementation analysis of naturally occurring mutant accessions provided evidence that the leucin-rich repeat receptor-like Ser/Thr kinase gene, ERECTA, controls ethylene-induced hyponastic growth. Moreover, ERECTA controls leaf positioning in the absence of ethylene treatment. Our data demonstrate that this is not due to altered ethylene production or sensitivity. [source]


,Senescence-associated vacuoles' are involved in the degradation of chloroplast proteins in tobacco leaves

THE PLANT JOURNAL, Issue 2 2008
Dana E. Martínez
Summary Massive degradation of photosynthetic proteins is the hallmark of leaf senescence; however the mechanism involved in chloroplast protein breakdown is not completely understood. As small ,senescence-associated vacuoles' (SAVs) with intense proteolytic activity accumulate in senescing leaves of soybean and Arabidopsis, the main goal of this work was to determine whether SAVs are involved in the degradation of chloroplastic components. SAVs with protease activity were readily detected through confocal microscopy of naturally senescing leaves of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). In detached leaves incubated in darkness, acceleration of the chloroplast degradation rate by ethylene treatment correlated with a twofold increase in the number of SAVs per cell, compared to untreated leaves. In a tobacco line expressing GFP targeted to plastids, GFP was re-located to SAVs in senescing leaves. SAVs were isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Isolated SAVs contained chloroplast-targeted GFP and the chloroplast stromal proteins Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) and glutamine synthetase, but lacked the thylakoid proteins D1 and light-harvesting complex II of the photosystem II reaction center and photosystem II antenna, respectively. In SAVs incubated at 30°C, there was a steady decrease in Rubisco levels, which was completely abolished by addition of protease inhibitors. These results indicate that SAVs are involved in degradation of the soluble photosynthetic proteins of the chloroplast stroma during senescence of leaves. [source]