Ethics Research (ethics + research)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Ethics Research: an Accounting Educator's Perspective

AUSTRALIAN ACCOUNTING REVIEW, Issue 38 2006
K. A. VAN PEURSEM
This review of ethics education in accounting shows the contributions of, and gaps in, existing work. The investigation can contribute directly to an ethics educational program, while shedding light on topics that could be usefully extended. The paper is structured uniquely for educational interests by forming primary categories around the needs of the educational manager and the classroom educator; subcategories are drawn from the literature itself. The analysis anchors on McDonald and Donleavy's (1995) review and looks to studies published in the decade between 1995 and early 2005. [source]


Regional Cultural Differences and Ethical Perspectives within the United States: Avoiding Pseudo-emic Ethics Research

BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 1 2010
BRENT MACNAB
ABSTRACT National cultures are often described as if they were homogeneous in spite of notable regional differences. As one example, there are significant differences between two distinct regions of the United States, Hawaii and Florida. This study provides a platform to exemplify a more regionally aware position for cultural and ethics research. Using select Hofstede cultural dimensions, regional differences were found in relation to both collectivism/individualism and uncertainty avoidance. The Hawaii sample had higher levels of collectivism and uncertainty avoidance, demonstrating unique regional-cultural patterns within the United States. Regional samples were examined for potential differences in their general perception of what constitutes ethical business practice. While honesty appeared as a key trait across samples, significant differences emerged in the magnitude of importance between samples for integrity (which was more significant for the Hawaii sample) and loyalty (which was more significant for the Florida sample). [source]


Capacity to consent to research in schizophrenia: the expanding evidence base,

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES & THE LAW, Issue 4 2006
Laura B. Dunn M.D.
Capacity to consent to research, fundamental to informed consent and thus vital to the ethical conduct of research, may be impaired among a variety of research populations. Until recently, relatively little empirical evidence has been available to inform discussion and policy-making regarding whose capacity should be assessed, what should be measured, and how it should be measured. Capacity to consent to research has emerged as a central topic in the field of "empirical ethics," an important area of biomedical research devoted to bringing evidence-based methods to the study of ethically salient issues in biomedical and biopsychosocial research. In this paper, empirical studies of capacity to consent to research are reviewed, with a particular focus on studies involving people with schizophrenia. These studies provide intriguing data regarding the nature, correlates, and modifiability of decisional abilities among potentially vulnerable research populations, including individuals with serious neuropsychiatric illnesses. Areas in need of further empirical ethics research are highlighted. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Regional Cultural Differences and Ethical Perspectives within the United States: Avoiding Pseudo-emic Ethics Research

BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 1 2010
BRENT MACNAB
ABSTRACT National cultures are often described as if they were homogeneous in spite of notable regional differences. As one example, there are significant differences between two distinct regions of the United States, Hawaii and Florida. This study provides a platform to exemplify a more regionally aware position for cultural and ethics research. Using select Hofstede cultural dimensions, regional differences were found in relation to both collectivism/individualism and uncertainty avoidance. The Hawaii sample had higher levels of collectivism and uncertainty avoidance, demonstrating unique regional-cultural patterns within the United States. Regional samples were examined for potential differences in their general perception of what constitutes ethical business practice. While honesty appeared as a key trait across samples, significant differences emerged in the magnitude of importance between samples for integrity (which was more significant for the Hawaii sample) and loyalty (which was more significant for the Florida sample). [source]